Do You Get Treated With Respect By The Dock Workers (when Making Or Picking Up A Delivery)?

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Nick S.'s Comment
member avatar

I've found that respectable people are rarely the ones you hear complaining they're being disrespected.

Hello James H.,

Thank you for taking the time to respond to my friend’s question and for sharing your views on this issue.

On the behalf of my friend, thank you for your help, it is greatly appreciated.

Kind Regards,

Nick S.

Nick S.'s Comment
member avatar

People often treat others based on how they are treated. I am often one of the "favorites" driver. Because I smile and am pleasant. There may be 2 in the past I remember as miserable.

NOTE to Nick.. There is no way your friend's posts are sitting in approval status for 2 weeks. 1 day maximum. I, as well as the other moderators see them. No legitimate question gets rejected. I have rejected a ton of spam lately.... But no way are his legitimate questions being rejected or being held

Sorry.

Hi Truckin Along With Kearsey,

Thank you for taking the time to respond to my friend’s question and for sharing your experiences on this issue. I will send your response to him.

On the behalf of my friend, thank you for your help, it is greatly appreciated. Maybe something happened after he set up his account and there could be a glitch in the system. Who is to say what or why this has happened. Yet for sure, every time he submits a question in this forum, he instantly gets a pop-up message that state something to effect of waiting for moderator approval status, and his post are never being approved/posted. I'm guessing this only happens to new members? As I know that my posts/questions automatically appear in this forum without being held for approval.

Kind Regards,

Nick S.

BMI:

Body mass index (BMI)

BMI is a formula that uses weight and height to estimate body fat. For most people, BMI provides a reasonable estimate of body fat. The BMI's biggest weakness is that it doesn't consider individual factors such as bone or muscle mass. BMI may:

  • Underestimate body fat for older adults or other people with low muscle mass
  • Overestimate body fat for people who are very muscular and physically fit

It's quite common, especially for men, to fall into the "overweight" category if you happen to be stronger than average. If you're pretty strong but in good shape then pay no attention.

Nick S.'s Comment
member avatar

Nick, what screen name (profile) does your friend use on Trucking Truth? I’m monitoring for another hour, have him send us something.

G-Town,

I rely your message to my friend when I see him next week.

Thank you.

Nick S.

Nick S.'s Comment
member avatar

I have only been trucking just shy of a year at this point so my opinion is limited by the other experience presented here.

But I can honestly say that the overwhelming number of dock/receivers I meet are great. They are blue collars folks just like us who just want to make it through the day with minimal headache (also like us). Occasionally, I will bump into a moody receiving clerk or lumper representative. I just kill them with kindness or keep it one dimensional. Some of them have reasons to be upset, others are mad that the sun rose in the east and set in the west as per usual.

Personally, I find delivery day to be one of the better days on the job because I usually get to BS with employees of smaller DCs for a few minutes which breaks up the routine of driving for days.

I find that I have more issues with other truckers than I do anyone else in this line of work. Some are great and want to nothing more than to help (like folks on this forum), some others are rude, inconsiderate, and have grossly over inflated egos.

Regardless, if someone presents an issue, the best option is to not lean into it. You will only hurt yourself by taking the bait. But again, I can't stress enough how uncommon these unpleasantries have been for me. But everyone's mileage may vary.

Greetings Drew D.,

Thank you for taking the time to respond to my friend’s question and for sharing your experiences on this issue. I will relay what you shared when I see him next time.

On the behalf of my friend, thank you for your help, it is greatly appreciated. Most of all, thank you for taking the time to share as much as you did. I’m sure my friend will find it very useful going forward.

Kind Regards,

Nick S.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Nick S.'s Comment
member avatar

There are some who entertain the stereotype that the trucking and supply chain industry is populated by ill tempered, surly people. My experience is just the opposite. 99% of those I have contact with are friendly and helpful. A smile and a courteous greeting will get most people to relax and enjoy the encounter. Just like on the road, if a driver is courteous, other drivers will react in kind.

Hello BK,

Thank you for taking the time to respond to my friend’s question and for sharing your experiences on this issue. I will relay what you shared when I see him next time.

On the behalf of my friend, thank you for your help, it is greatly appreciated. Kind Regards,

Nick S.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Nick S.'s Comment
member avatar

For the most part the folks I deal with are kind and helpful. One issue I have, and others might have experienced this as well, is that sometimes a shipper/receiver will assume you've been there before and you know exactly what their procedures are.

You'll arrive at the gate and the guard will say l something like, "drop that in slot 225 and grab an empty from the other side of the building"...and that's it. That's all they say. So you drop and grab an empty and head back out the gate. When you get to the gate they ask for a gate pass (not every place requires a gate pass). They then tell you to go to the office at door -- to turn in paperwork and get a gate pass. Not every place requires you to enter the building. Many have you drop and hook and handle the paperwork right at the guard shack/gate (like most Walmarts).

I try to make it a point to mention that "I've never been to this place and I don't know the procedures". It helps avoid miscommunication.

Hello RealDiehl,

Thank you for taking the time to respond to my friend’s question and for sharing your experiences on this issue. I will relay what you shared when I see him next time.

On the behalf of my friend, thank you for your help, it is greatly appreciated. Most of all, thank you for sharing as much as you did.

Kind Regards,

Nick S.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

Nick S.'s Comment
member avatar

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Nick, what screen name (profile) does your friend use on Trucking Truth? I’m monitoring for another hour, have him send us something.

double-quotes-end.png

This has been asked before, yet never answered by "Nick".

As for the question "for a friend", join the Trucking Truth group. Stop playing foolish games!

PackRat,

Not playing any games. I only check this forum once or twice a week. Today is the first day that I have returned and read all of the replies since I first posted this particular post about 3 or 4 days ago. So it would be helpful if I was offered some patience to try to respond to all of the people that were kind to reply. In regards to your reply, this issue is being addressed (via a post that I have already posted earlier in this same post).

Kind Regards,

Nick S.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Nick S.'s Comment
member avatar

When I worked as Dock worker the drivers loved me cause I was quick at unloading them and getting them in and out so much so they would bring me gifts on the holidays and food hehe. Now that I’m a driver I do the same.

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NOTE: I’m posting this post (below) for a friend (who is interested in becoming a truck driver) who setup a new TT member account in September, but all of his questions keep going into a “waiting for moderator approval status” and are never being approved/posted to this forum for some reason. So I am only posting his questions after they have stayed in the “waiting for moderator approval status” for 2+ weeks.

Seeing the big demand for truck drivers over the past two years (if those national news stories are true about the truck driver shortage), I was curious, do you truck drivers get treated good and with respect by the dock workers/the people you interface with at the companies when making or picking up a delivery? I used to work at Target for 10 years as an outside vendor. Yet I would have to go to their dock on occasion and talk with their Receivers or other dock workers, to locate shipments of merchandise in order to restock my section of the store. I really hated how moody, mean, nasty, disrespectful many of their Recievers and dock workers were (as I worked in over 10 different Target stores, during my career there). Yet it seemed like some dock workers had their favorite truck drivers and treated them nice and with respect, yet the other truck drivers  they would treat as bitter enemies. I never understood this nasty Reciver and dock worker mentality happening at so many different Target stores. So I was just curious as to your experiences of how you have been treated by dock workers in general at various companies when making or picking up a delivery. Maybe it could be an isolated issue happening only at some Target stores with their Recievers and dock workers.

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Hello William D. ,

Thank you for taking the time to respond to my friend’s question and for sharing your experiences on this issue. I will relay what you shared when I see him next time.

On the behalf of my friend, thank you for your help, it is greatly appreciated.

Kind Regards,

Nick S.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Nick S.'s Comment
member avatar

Only, remember 1 time, I was at a DC (forget who/where) the shipping guys were up on a platform. This driver was going ballistic on these guys, totally acting like an asshat. I stood there waiting my turn, finally the driver stomped off like a 5 year old having a hissy fit, cussin' em the whole time. They were actually, more or less ignoring his rant and remained pleasant, and professional. I try and kill em with kindness myself, "ya get more bee's with honey than sour vinegar" attitude.....

Hello Stevo Reno,

Thank you for taking the time to respond to my friend’s question and for sharing your experiences on this issue. I will relay what you shared when I see him next time.

On the behalf of my friend, thank you for your help, it is greatly appreciated.

Kind Regards,

Nick S.

Nick S.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I just kill them with kindness

double-quotes-end.png

That was my grandma's favorite saying, and she was the master at it. The kindest woman you ever met.

Most people are like mirrors; they'll reflect whatever you give. If you're kind and friendly, rarely will anyone give you trouble. If they do give you trouble, and you continue to be kind, 95% of the time they'll drop the attitude and things will go well.

Master yourself and you'll find that handling others is pretty easy.

Hey there Brett Aquila,

Thank you for taking the time to respond to my friend’s question and for sharing your experiences on this issue. I will relay what you shared when I see him next time.

On the behalf of my friend, thank you for your help, it is greatly appreciated.

Kind Regards,

Nick S.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
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