I'm Looking For A Job With No Mileage Pay. Why Is This So Hard?

Topic 33911 | Page 2

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Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

I wouldn't say the way you're compensated matters. What DOES matter is how it all plays out in the end and if you feel you're earning what you feel you're worth.

My employer gives us the option of hourly or mile/stop. The way things are currently set up I'm actually earning MORE being mile/stop than hourly. A couple years ago we had drivers for TMC make a killing on percentage pay while freight rates were high. Now that rates have dropped they're likely not doing as well and possibly earn LESS than those on CPM.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Bigtime's Comment
member avatar

Welcome to the forum Bigtime!

I completely relate with your struggles, especially because I’ve done a lot of local and regional work in my short career (I’ve been driving just over 6 years) and the pay tends to work quite a bit different on local stuff. I just went back to a true OTR gig (out for 3 weeks minimum) for the first time since my first year trucking and it’s definitely a little bit of culture shock. I do flatbed so I generally have very little wait time at shippers and receivers, but even things like getting the truck worked on or going home are stressful for me because I’m used to those things being more naturally worked into my schedule and not losing money on those things. The last local job I worked, I got a nice truck that was turned up, could go the speed limit, home daily with occasional regional runs, and I was compensated by the run (not by the mile) with $25/hr detention that kicked in after an hour every single time. Everything is different OTR and personally I believe OTR drivers get screwed more than any other segment of the industry. We can make decent money but we have to either log things questionably and/or sacrifice a lot of our personal time to do it.

Point being, I get it.

My advice is don’t swing doors if you want to do OTR but don’t want to spend a lot of time in docks. Flatbed is a great option if you want to spend less time at shippers and receivers, but it’s more work. I think it definitely has its perks like a better schedule overall, healthier lifestyle, pride in the work, less time sitting and waiting. I’d have a hard time saying it pays noticeably better than any other segment of trucking though so if you don’t enjoy getting your hands dirty you’re going to hate it.

Tanker is another option I’d look into if you haven’t already. That local gig I was talking about was pneumatic tanker. I’ve never done a liquid tanker gig but I would imagine the pay structure at shippers and receivers is a tad different like it was for me because there’s more involved than just waiting to get loaded or unloaded. You have to load and unload yourself. We have a couple tanker guys here on the forum that will hopefully chime in here.

Another option is LTL work. Whether it’s P&D or linehaul , those drivers tend to get compensated much more fairly than OTR drivers generally are in my opinion.

I’m sure there are other options I’m not thinking of at the moment. There are so many avenues in trucking it’s insane and with you having experience and a decent record you would be eligible for most jobs that are out there.

There are more and more OTR jobs paying hourly and/or having a minimum guarantee so if that’s what you’re looking for I’m sure you can find it. I tend to shy away from them because the ceiling is higher with cpm at a lot of places. Good luck

I'm sorry it's been a few days. A lot has happened this past week, and I don't have internet at the house.

Also, thanks for the input.

I'd be interested in doing some pneumatic dry bulk. I have a tank endorsement but not Hazmat. Are the hoses very heavy? One reason I've stayed away from flatbed is I don't have the back for it. I have picked up a tarp and walked the length of a trailer once, and I felt like I was going to collapse under its weight. I need to work out more, but I also have some back issues that make that kind of work very painful.

I do think I want to get away from swinging doors.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Bigtime's Comment
member avatar

I wouldn't say the way you're compensated matters. What DOES matter is how it all plays out in the end and if you feel you're earning what you feel you're worth.

My employer gives us the option of hourly or mile/stop. The way things are currently set up I'm actually earning MORE being mile/stop than hourly. A couple years ago we had drivers for TMC make a killing on percentage pay while freight rates were high. Now that rates have dropped they're likely not doing as well and possibly earn LESS than those on CPM.

I hear the market is pretty messed up right now. Farmers can't get enough for their grain. I look at ads for trucking jobs and they are a lot less tempting than the ads I remember seeing several years ago. I won't go back OTR without the money. Every time I go to the store, or pull up at the gas pump, I'm getting squeezed for even more.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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