Question For The Reefer Pullers

Topic 3535 | Page 1

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:
Scott B.'s Comment
member avatar

Every time I pickup or deliver from from a food/ grocery place it is an absolute nightmare. It takes 10+ hrs to get loaded or unloaded. If I'm 30 mins early they want me to leave and if I'm 1 min late they act like I just burned the reichstag and invaded Poland. The receiving clerks make DMV workers look like Will Rogers and the little pipsqueak lumper reps act like......well union reps.

My question is does the life of a driver for a refrigerated carrier consists of this constantly? Have I just been unlucky or am I doing something wrong here? So far my experience pulling foodstuffs has cured me of any desire to ever drive reefer. I think I'd rather clean bull haulers in Phoenix.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Dave D. (Armyman)'s Comment
member avatar

Reefer is a system all its own. You could get loaded or unloaded anywhere from 30 minutes to four hours, and they will take anywhere from 30 minutes to four hours after they are done to get you your bills. It's the nature of temperature controlled loads.

Dave

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Jopa's Comment
member avatar
If I'm 30 mins early they want me to leave and if I'm 1 min late they act like I just burned the reichstag and invaded Poland

So, essentially, you are saying they are ALL Nazi's?? Say it ain't so, Joe!! I thought we defeated those guys and rid the world of their ilk 60+ years ago!! Oh well, that's life in the big city, eh?

Jopa

smile.gif

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Dave D. (Armyman)'s Comment
member avatar

Temp. Control is what it is. The shippers and receivers are in control, once you pull onto their property.

Dave

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

This is a very popular topic amongst reefer haulers.

Reefer really isn't bad though. It depends on how you look at it. These refrigerated warehouses have a lot more truck traffic than other divisions, its only natural that they might take a little while. But I really don't see the point in this subject.

Fletbedders arrive at a shipper and get loaded. Then they spend time in a scorching sun or freezing winter to wrap their load. They don't get in and out.

Tanker drivers have to hook up and wait for their freight to drain. They also have to deal with chemical plants and wearing suits for their own protection.

At least you're sitting in a climate-controlled truck waiting instead of being outdoors in the elements.

And here's another point. Most large carriers have a detention pay system set up. After the second hour you get 15$ on average hourly. That's pretty damn good considering you're not working. While its not as much as you make while driving, it provides a nice break from the wheel and at the same time still making money.

Why not go to sleep? Why not play some videogames? Why not take some time and read? You're getting paid for doing those activities after the second hour.

Look, I know this world is overtaken by money and "how much do you make?" but its really best to try to not concentrate on the money in this industry. Everyday there are things that will slow you and your profits down, if you get angry each time it happens because it took 5$ out of your wallet then you'll have a heart attack before you reach a million miles.

When you're running extremely hard its healthy to take a break and walk around a little. Get up off that seat. How you use that down time while waiting is the most important piece into how you'll perceive the long wait times associated with reefer.

I rather enjoy the downtime. It allows me a chance to actually go on this website and perhaps once again be a contributing member. It allows me to go for a walk and play some games on my laptop. I run hard. Harder than you think (just ask Ken). I don't like to stop unless I'm forced to. So the waiting times at shippers/receiving is actually a blessing for me because it allows me to sort of "get away" from everything and recuperate.

The average driver sits on the seat all day long, then while they're at a customer they continue to sit on the seat. That's the worst. That's what makes the time drag on. Get off the seat and enjoy your few hours of having a break in which you're being paid 15/h.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Starcar's Comment
member avatar

We bought our first truck with a reefer hooked to it....It took a year to make me go postal.....and i"m a calm sweet little old lady !!! We traded it in for a flatbed...best thing to happen in my entire life....It takes ALOT of patience to pull a fridge...I don't have it.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Scott B.'s Comment
member avatar

Yeah I lose my smile when ever I see the name of a grocery chain on my Qualcomm. Just never had any good experience with them. Couldn't imagine it being every load.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.
James925's Comment
member avatar

Reefer loads are what they are. Sometimes you'll pull into a warehouse or grocery distribution center, and you'll be in and out in less than an hour and a half. Others, it will take you two hours just to get a door, then you hang out at the door for another four hours before you even feel them start to unload your trailer. The good thing about reefers is your product is temperature controlled so it's not going to perish. The bad thing is your product is temperature controlled so it's not going to perish. Which means, you can (and will) sit for loooooong periods of time unfortunately.

Case in point, there is an Americold dc in Tracy, CA that I went to twice, both with my parents cause I wanted them to see what I did exactly. (And cause I just wanted to brag to them that I drove a big truck) First time, went in with my mother, dropped off the bills in the office, got a door, and got unloaded all within an hour and a half. Went home after and got some much needed rest. Second time, went in with my father, bills and door were done within 10 minutes, thinking everything is good...didn't even get unloaded until seven hours later. It all depends on the day I guess. Some days are great, others, not so much.

I think Daniel nailed it. I ran hard too, and whenever I had some down time, I relished it. I had a netbook and would watch a dvd, do some web surfing, or even walk around the truck stop. Or even get some sleep. Truckers definitely need it. But don't get me wrong, there were times where it got annoying, like when I was at the Budweiser plant in Denver, CO and I sat at the door for 12 hours before I even got unloaded. Then after I got unloaded, it took another 7 for me to get another trailer and get out of there. Didn't get on the road until 11 pm that night. Monster energy drinks were definitely my friend that shift. Oh and the chocolate ice cream I got from a truck stop in Iowa around 2 in the morning. Mmmm chocolate ice cream.

So don't get discouraged. Sometimes you're rolling, in and out before you can finish writing the comcheck for the lumpers (okay, maybe not that quick, but you get the idea) and other times, you just want to get out of there and hit the road! In my experience (can't speak for others) the longest "delays" at the distribution centers seemed to happen on the loads where I had hometime after. I think my dm would call the receiver and make them keep me there a little longer. smile.gif

Hang in there...

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

guyjax(Guy Hodges)'s Comment
member avatar

As most know I am a team truck. We are always moving. I love delays at shipping docks. Allows me to wind down.

I mostly do alot of drop and hook and I love it but today we were in McAllen tx waiting to get loaded and it took 4.5 hours. I did not complain cause boarder loads always take a while to clear customs. So I pulled out my phone and watched youtube videos. And ya know what? I did not even ask for dentin pay. Why ya may ask? While true I could have gotten it no problem and it's true I really don't need it like some may need it but I look at it as doing a favor for my dm.

Almost all companies are setup the same way and it's broken down into groups. You have dm's over there driver and they are in a fleet which means they are also in a division. Every time someone ask for detention pay it comes out of your fleets budget for that month. By not asking for it is helps with the budget and makes your DM look better.

Oh I get taken care of because of it. Most companies give ya 1 day off for ever 7 worked. I always get an extra day off at the house. If I need to shutdown for whatever reason I am not questioned.

One time I told my DM I had lost my qualcomm and needed 24 hours to find it even though I was typing the message to him on it. He laughed and said he pushed me out to the next morning for my ETA. Estimated Time of Availability.

One time I sent in this message...."Pssst! Jim this is Guy's brain. He does not known I have gone missing but I am to little to miss anyways....." lol got a 34 hour restart with that one.

Point is you just have to learn to roll with the punches out here on the road (insane asylum) and learn to relax when ya can and find humor when ya cant. There will always be delays out here. No getting around that. It's what you do with those delayed times which can help or hurt ya.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
RedGator's Comment
member avatar

You have seemed to luck out with 10+ hrs every time. Typical is 2 to 5 hrs. Can be more. Could be less. I prefer my down time as well but totally get where your coming from being stuck that long. I cant "settle" in when its unknown how long I will be somewhere. I just cant relax. I can however nap for about 1 or 2. I dont cook my own food so id be starving if no one delivered. Reefer isnt for everyone. Some ppl have no patience and like to keep moving. Dry van would be excellent for you if thats the case. THERE IS NOTHING WRONG WITH HOW YOU FEEL! We all have our personal preferences. Yep flatbedders "sweat it out" outside but guess what thats a personal choice. Maybe reefer isnt for you.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

This topic has the following tags:

Life On The Road
Click on any of the buttons above to view topics with that tag, or you can view a list of all forum tags here.

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More