I Was Fired Now What??

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Larry G.'s Comment
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Hi, well I learned to drive unfortunately it cost me my job. Not exactly, about 7 months ago enrolled in CRST training program, passed test, went on road with lead driver, then set out on own with co-driver. During this time I drove approximately 30,000 miles east to west and I love it. Unfortunately, I was let go on April 1st. Yes I am the fool for taking things so lightly because I was involved in 3 accidents all within a short period. Accidents were minor with no injuries, citations or points on license. Here is my dilemma, I am still under contract with CRST, until training fees are paid, but I cannot secure any driving position, which is about the only thing that agrees with my body because any perspective employer fears being sued by CRST so they will not hire me. I could borrow the money to pay CRST, but I will not do so until I have a job. In an attempt to make myself marketable I recently acquired tanker endorsement and passport and are studying for hazmat endorsement. I just want to drive! Any advice on this matter would be very helpful. Thank you,

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Fatsquatch 's Comment
member avatar

You're in a pretty tough spot there. That many accidents in such a short time is going to make a lot of companies look at you as an excessive risk. Especially since you were fired because of it. The only thing you can really do is apply for every driving job, big or small, and hope somebody out there is willing to give you a shot.

Fatsquatch 's Comment
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Oh, and stop hitting things. That would help too. smile.gif

Dave D. (Armyman)'s Comment
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How can you be "under contract" if they fired you. That is one reason why I don't like company schools. They really don't need a reason to fire you. Although those accidents gave them good reason, many companies hire "at will."

Dave

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Scott B.'s Comment
member avatar

Yeah that's a pretty crumby tactic to hold you to a contract that they will not allow you to fulfill when you tried in good faith. Smacks of indentured servitude. I think I'd contact a lawyer but first I would find out what's on my DAC report. If CRST hadn't put anything on your DAC lawyering up might cause them to do so.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Kevin C.'s Comment
member avatar

Even though I have been across this country a hundred times in a "four wheeler" dash cam will save your ass......

Old School's Comment
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Oh, and stop hitting things. That would help too.

Larry, Fatsquatch gave you the best advice yet. Look, we've got to realize that part of being "under contract" with a Company-Sponsored Training program is that the driver is expected to operate in a safe and professional manner. Three accidents in a short period is unacceptable by any ones standard. You really hurt yourself here, and no one could logically apply any blame to CRST.

This is going to be a tough situation. You're gonna have to be real persistent with applications and talking to recruiters. You will, of course, need to explain fully what happened and convey to them in a convincing manner that you have learned your lesson and can do this job safely. This is why we always encourage people to get in one year of safe driving with their first trucking job. The severity of the accidents isn't really all that important, but surely you realize that three in a short period says volumes about your willingness to be actively on the alert and cautious about what's going on around your vehicle.

Larry, I wish you the best in this pursuit of a new job. Be persistent and realize that you will probably have to take what ever you can get. There are some companies that are a little less strict on entry level drivers, keep at it and hopefully you will find someone who will give you a second chance. But, remember you've already got three strikes against you, that means you will need to be hyper-careful about how you are maneuvering that big truck around.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

Wine Taster's Comment
member avatar

I agree Old School, no way possible to blame CRST. I would not be surprised if the insurance company said noway thins guy can drive for you anymore. CRST upheld their part of the bargain. They trained you. They put you in a truck to drive. You failed on your end of the bargain when you had three accidents. I know you are not making excuses, it is more of a response to other responses.

As for getting hired somewhere else. It is going to be really hard. You have proven yourself to be unreliable. You are going to have to find a company that is willing to take the risk. They will probably offer you much less pay per mile. They will watch you like a hawk. They may even want you to go back out with a trainer. One mistake with said new company, you will be fired again. You are going to have to blanket apply as others have said. Call and follow up with every company. Be persistent. It is going to be hard but you may get lucky and find a new spot.

Now, on the flip side, if you do not get hired. Do not stiff CRST. Pay the money or they can put a collection on your credit. Depending on how it was set up, they may even be able to put a judgement against you for non payment. It is easy for you to say you are not going to pay them because YOU messed up. They can hurt your credit for many years to come. Don't make a bad situation even worse for yourself. No job and then bad credit.

Dave D. (Armyman)'s Comment
member avatar

I wouldn't say "unreliable." Unsafe? Maybe. Three accidents tends to say "unsafe." "Unreliable," tends to say "always late for pick up and delivery."

Question: is CRST demanding repayment of their training?

Dave

guyjax(Guy Hodges)'s Comment
member avatar

Regardless of tickets or not. 3 accidents in a very short time will know anyone out of the trucking industry.

here is what you are work against and its going to be an uphill battle the entire way. 3 accidents. Most companies only allow 2 in a 3 year period. So now you will have to wait a while. Ok check your driving record and DAC report. KNOW whats on them.

Now when trying to get another job you will have to list CRST as an employer. Trucking companies WILL call them and ask for the reason for termination and yes termination will be on your DAC. They will be told you were fired and why. Both reasons will cause companies not to hire you.

Apply everywhere and maybe someone might take a chance on you. Maybe. But here is what companies are looking at.......This driver has shown a pattern of bad driving behavior which resulted in 3 minor accidents....How long before his luck runs out and he can't get slowed down and kills someone and we are sued for millions?

No one will or can take a chance just by your word that you have learned you lesson and will start taking driving more serious.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

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