Driving For Schneider Vs. ABF, US Express

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RedKnight's Comment
member avatar

Thanks to all who responded to my request for help in backing, sincerely appreciate it. I printed each one out and took notes. Wanted to touch base once more on another subject. I have been pre-hired by Schneider National, and wanted to ask all you present and former Schneider driver's about your experiences with them. I reviewed them on this site months ago, and many of ThinksTooMuch's messages and decided to go with them. Just wanted to get some more feedback while I have time before I commit. I have also been pre-hired by US Express, and ABF also wants to hire me, but they told me to start out I would be a casual employee meaning I would be on call to work at the terminal (loading and unloading trailers) for about 2 months before I could become a regular employee. My instructor at school knew of one guy who worked for ABF a year, he loaded and unloaded at the terminal and they never did give him a chance to drive, so he left. Thanks in advance.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Pre-hire:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

guyjax(Guy Hodges)'s Comment
member avatar

As many know ABF is a union based company and the the union part is not that hard to get on to. It's the actual driving part. In order to get on there as a driver you have to have had doubles and triples training and also have logged actual doubles and triples miles on a log book. Without proof of either you will find it very difficult to drive for ABF.

Now Schneider or US Express either of those companies are great to start out with. If it were me I would lean more towards Schneider due to the variety of different fleets they have. But either company is a solid choice to start with.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
RedKnight's Comment
member avatar

As many know ABF is a union based company and the the union part is not that hard to get on to. It's the actual driving part. In order to get on there as a driver you have to have had doubles and triples training and also have logged actual doubles and triples miles on a log book. Without proof of either you will find it very difficult to drive for ABF.

Now Schneider or US Express either of those companies are great to start out with. If it were me I would lean more towards Schneider due to the variety of different fleets they have. But either company is a solid choice to start with.

Guy, once again, thanks very much. My first choice has always been Schneider and you just confirmed it for me. Can't tell you how much help I've gotten from reading you on this website. Thanks again.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
guyjax(Guy Hodges)'s Comment
member avatar

I try my best to think of my past and current place in trucking and what I might like to do or not do in the future.

Only reason I knew what I did and what I said in the ABF paragraph is i am current in a long process of dealing with them and new contract that have been approved by the Union that Werner is on the ground floor of. I recently went through double and triples training and after pulling a set of doubles around Omaha NE I know for a fact that doubles are much easier to control and maneuver in tight places that a 53 foot trailer could not even dream of doing.

But anyway I figured anyone could have told you about Schneider or US Express but I had a little info about a Company that someone who has not dealt with them would not have.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

RedKnight's Comment
member avatar

I try my best to think of my past and current place in trucking and what I might like to do or not do in the future.

Only reason I knew what I did and what I said in the ABF paragraph is i am current in a long process of dealing with them and new contract that have been approved by the Union that Werner is on the ground floor of. I recently went through double and triples training and after pulling a set of doubles around Omaha NE I know for a fact that doubles are much easier to control and maneuver in tight places that a 53 foot trailer could not even dream of doing.

But anyway I figured anyone could have told you about Schneider or US Express but I had a little info about a Company that someone who has not dealt with them would not have.

Still, I can tell you there have been times over the last few months, since I was let go from my job, that I had second guesses of going into trucking. But one morning I got up, about 2 months ago, grabbed a cup of coffee, sat down and went on TT, and you had responded to someone on I why you love your trucking job. It was a lengthy response, but it was quite detailed, including all the sites you've experienced and how happy that made you. When I got done reading that, I made up my mind to go for it.

I'm 57, have always been in business (and frankly, except for the money, never loved it), and after getting layed-off, could not get another job. I had a buddy who did the same thing I did, and he got layed off after being with the same company for 20 years. He's been out of work now for over 2 years. I told my wife the day I lost my job this past January, that I would not allow that to happen to me. That I would try to get another job in business, but at the same time, I would research trucking. She now is on board with it 100% and realizes it's the better choice. We have addressed the change in lifestyle and are reading to embrace it. In fact she looks forward to going with me occasionally. Our two daughters have graduated college over that last few years and are living home to save money, so that will help in the transition. Two of my wife's friends, have husbands who both drive OTR dexdxand she has been talking to them about it, and they have helped her a lot.

I drove a company van for a company when I was 19 years old, while I was going to junior college in NJ. Twice a day I would drive up I-287, 90 minutes each way, then when I was done by 1 in the afternoon, I went to junior college classes. I hated school, I was always a C-B student, but when I was driving up that intertstate, watching the big rigs drive by, I thought how awesome it would be to drive a truck. I-287 goes through nice areas, a little mountainous, and I loved being on the road, being outdoors, experiencing all four seasons, taking 10 minute naps in the rest areas. I had a buddy who was driving for Union Carbide at that time and today, he is 61, owns his own rig and still drives OTR 5 days a week. I spoke to him about this decision a couple times, but he's hard to get in touch with. So I have been reading TT forums since January, and I always look for your replies, they are always accurate, to the point with no BS, and as I mentioned, you have been a great influence and very encouraging. I plan to touch base with you as I move forward. Thanks once again, and be safe. And if you are a dad...Happy Fathers Day.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

guyjax(Guy Hodges)'s Comment
member avatar

till, I can tell you there have been times over the last few months, since I was let go from my job, that I had second guesses of going into trucking. But one morning I got up, about 2 months ago, grabbed a cup of coffee, sat down and went on TT, and you had responded to someone on I why you love your trucking job. It was a lengthy response, but it was quite detailed, including all the sites you've experienced and how happy that made you. When I got done reading that, I made up my mind to go for it.

I'm 57, have always been in business (and frankly, except for the money, never loved it), and after getting layed-off, could not get another job. I had a buddy who did the same thing I did, and he got layed off after being with the same company for 20 years. He's been out of work now for over 2 years. I told my wife the day I lost my job this past January, that I would not allow that to happen to me. That I would try to get another job in business, but at the same time, I would research trucking. She now is on board with it 100% and realizes it's the better choice. We have addressed the change in lifestyle and are reading to embrace it. In fact she looks forward to going with me occasionally. Our two daughters have graduated college over that last few years and are living home to save money, so that will help in the transition. Two of my wife's friends, have husbands who both drive OTR dexdxand she has been talking to them about it, and they have helped her a lot.

I drove a company van for a company when I was 19 years old, while I was going to junior college in NJ. Twice a day I would drive up I-287, 90 minutes each way, then when I was done by 1 in the afternoon, I went to junior college classes. I hated school, I was always a C-B student, but when I was driving up that intertstate, watching the big rigs drive by, I thought how awesome it would be to drive a truck. I-287 goes through nice areas, a little mountainous, and I loved being on the road, being outdoors, experiencing all four seasons, taking 10 minute naps in the rest areas. I had a buddy who was driving for Union Carbide at that time and today, he is 61, owns his own rig and still drives OTR 5 days a week. I spoke to him about this decision a couple times, but he's hard to get in touch with. So I have been reading TT forums since January, and I always look for your replies, they are always accurate, to the point with no BS, and as I mentioned, you have been a great influence and very encouraging. I plan to touch base with you as I move forward. Thanks once again, and be safe. And if you are a dad...Happy Fathers Day.

Thank you. Though it no big deal. It's trucking ' s fault. I was only doing my best to explain what trucking means to me as an industry and has allowed me to do while being out here.

Trucking is one of the very few professions that allow for a truly nomadic lifestyle but still allows a connection to the rest of the world. Truth be told I would have been very comfortable on the front of a wagon in a gypsy caravan in the middle ages as I am in a big truck though I prefer a big truck cause it has A/C. ; D I need to start taking more pictures since Brett worked so hard on setting up a photo gallery for us.

I tend to be very 100% sure of myself to one extreme or another. Either I am totally against something or totally for something hence some of the strong opinions I have expressed on the forums. Still trying to temper that some due to the nature on the forums but it's hard to do since on the driver side of trucking there is little gray area for us. It's pretty black and white to us drivers.

I have no problem keeping in contact down the road. I talk with Ernie (Old Salty Dog) pretty much on a weekly basis. It's lucky enough that I can help since I was exactly where he is right now and on the same exact dedicated account he is running for JB Hunt.

Recently had a trip from Portland OR to Las Vegas. No direct route to get there so we took off through the woods. US 93/50/95 through some of this countries most remote areas was in a word....Cool. Natural lakes formed by the mountain valley's. Thousands of acres of land that can't be used due to the low lakes that form up the high when the snow melts and by the time it dries the growing season is more than half over with in those high altitudes. Know what the best part about it was? After 16 years of driving there are still places I have not seen yet.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

I am also a big fan of guyjax. Years ago, I detailed my plan to TT and he got my head out of my ass. I was way over my head with it. Straight to the point and honesty is how I like it, and I needed it. He helped me by not sugarcoating his response and let me know just how dumb my idea was and that it wouldn't work.

Some people can't handle him and his answers. But those are the people who won't be able to handle trucking either!

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
RedKnight's Comment
member avatar

I try my best to think of my past and current place in trucking and what I might like to do or not do in the future.

Only reason I knew what I did and what I said in the ABF paragraph is i am current in a long process of dealing with them and new contract that have been approved by the Union that Werner is on the ground floor of. I recently went through double and triples training and after pulling a set of doubles around Omaha NE I know for a fact that doubles are much easier to control and maneuver in tight places that a 53 foot trailer could not even dream of doing.

But anyway I figured anyone could have told you about Schneider or US Express but I had a little info about a Company that someone who has not dealt with them would not have.

At my age, I don't have time for BS, and your info always tells it like it is, and I really respect that.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

RedKnight's Comment
member avatar
double-quotes-start.png

till, I can tell you there have been times over the last few months, since I was let go from my job, that I had second guesses of going into trucking. But one morning I got up, about 2 months ago, grabbed a cup of coffee, sat down and went on TT, and you had responded to someone on I why you love your trucking job. It was a lengthy response, but it was quite detailed, including all the sites you've experienced and how happy that made you. When I got done reading that, I made up my mind to go for it.

I'm 57, have always been in business (and frankly, except for the money, never loved it), and after getting layed-off, could not get another job. I had a buddy who did the same thing I did, and he got layed off after being with the same company for 20 years. He's been out of work now for over 2 years. I told my wife the day I lost my job this past January, that I would not allow that to happen to me. That I would try to get another job in business, but at the same time, I would research trucking. She now is on board with it 100% and realizes it's the better choice. We have addressed the change in lifestyle and are reading to embrace it. In fact she looks forward to going with me occasionally. Our two daughters have graduated college over that last few years and are living home to save money, so that will help in the transition. Two of my wife's friends, have husbands who both drive OTR dexdxand she has been talking to them about it, and they have helped her a lot.

I drove a company van for a company when I was 19 years old, while I was going to junior college in NJ. Twice a day I would drive up I-287, 90 minutes each way, then when I was done by 1 in the afternoon, I went to junior college classes. I hated school, I was always a C-B student, but when I was driving up that intertstate, watching the big rigs drive by, I thought how awesome it would be to drive a truck. I-287 goes through nice areas, a little mountainous, and I loved being on the road, being outdoors, experiencing all four seasons, taking 10 minute naps in the rest areas. I had a buddy who was driving for Union Carbide at that time and today, he is 61, owns his own rig and still drives OTR 5 days a week. I spoke to him about this decision a couple times, but he's hard to get in touch with. So I have been reading TT forums since January, and I always look for your replies, they are always accurate, to the point with no BS, and as I mentioned, you have been a great influence and very encouraging. I plan to touch base with you as I move forward. Thanks once again, and be safe. And if you are a dad...Happy Fathers Day.

double-quotes-end.png

Thank you. Though it no big deal. It's trucking ' s fault. I was only doing my best to explain what trucking means to me as an industry and has allowed me to do while being out here.

Trucking is one of the very few professions that allow for a truly nomadic lifestyle but still allows a connection to the rest of the world. Truth be told I would have been very comfortable on the front of a wagon in a gypsy caravan in the middle ages as I am in a big truck though I prefer a big truck cause it has A/C. ; D I need to start taking more pictures since Brett worked so hard on setting up a photo gallery for us.

I tend to be very 100% sure of myself to one extreme or another. Either I am totally against something or totally for something hence some of the strong opinions I have expressed on the forums. Still trying to temper that some due to the nature on the forums but it's hard to do since on the driver side of trucking there is little gray area for us. It's pretty black and white to us drivers.

I have no problem keeping in contact down the road. I talk with Ernie (Old Salty Dog) pretty much on a weekly basis. It's lucky enough that I can help since I was exactly where he is right now and on the same exact dedicated account he is running for JB Hunt.

Recently had a trip from Portland OR to Las Vegas. No direct route to get there so we took off through the woods. US 93/50/95 through some of this countries most remote areas was in a word....Cool. Natural lakes formed by the mountain valley's. Thousands of acres of land that can't be used due to the low lakes that form up the high when the snow melts and by the time it dries the growing season is more than half over with in those high altitudes. Know what the best part about it was? After 16 years of driving there are still places I have not seen yet.

It's wonderful that after 16 years you're still making new discoveries. And don't change a thing on what you write and how your write it. if your opinions have benefited me, I'm sure they benefited countless other. I'll keep in touch as I progress, thanks again.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

RedKnight's Comment
member avatar

I am also a big fan of guyjax. Years ago, I detailed my plan to TT and he got my head out of my ass. I was way over my head with it. Straight to the point and honesty is how I like it, and I needed it. He helped me by not sugarcoating his response and let me know just how dumb my idea was and that it wouldn't work.

Some people can't handle him and his answers. But those are the people who won't be able to handle trucking either!

I know, right? He's awesome, and has been a huge asset to me as this change in lifestyle has proceeded. Looks like you have benefited from his advice as well Daniel. Hope I get to where you're at someday. :-)

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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