Thought It About Time I Say Have...

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Rabbitt's Comment
member avatar

been sandbagging here for a few month reading and soaking up all the information i can. just some concerns about CDL company ran school. They charge Interest? Thinking on Stevens Transportation for school. Thought since your signing a 1 yr contract with said company your school is payed for.. Stevens is a state sponsored school. being a state sponsored school seem to be a bit illegal to charge so much for school...

atm trying to get caught up on bills before school. im an Auto Glass Installer and do all the Glass for you truckers out there at the local Freightliner dealer here in town.... according what im reading ill take a pay decrease or make the same pay in trucking the first year out.. at 50 my body tries to tell me im getting old but climb 10 rigs a week to replace some of your Glass for your drivers.. mind tells my body to stop whining and get er done....

a friend who is O/O lease told me to go with Stevens for he knows there training procedures get my year and he will get me my own truck afterwards..

also read that i may spend up to 2 years paying back my training... the work is not the issue. not married or have children so being gone would be like a vacation.

i have tons of concerns on my carrier change but like i said the body said enough is enough. i dont want to get more in debt at losing money my first yr.

i do understand i have to put my time in.. i also did ground handling of Private Jets for 17 yrs before doing Glass work and understand more then you know about heavy stuff and stopping rofl it say's i dont wanna.

also read that it be wise to have a couple of grand in the bank when your start out OTR for scales toles and such... i guess still doing glass because yes i do have a job and stay busy most of the time.. most times if i have some what some say are stupid question i hit the guys up at the local dealer.

also not sure what way i want to go. Reefer , dry van or even flatbed for once i get my yr in the doors are already open for me in these fields.

just dont want to stay broke the rest of my life and watch the grass grow in the field behind the house.. yes i have started The High Road Online CDL Training Program here.... (Bret dont go looking at my scores just yet.. my fault if get antsy an dont read the question correctly lol)

another very large concern. i grew up in Los angeles for 34yrs.. since i have been in this small town for almost 17 yrs i dont like the new overpasses and patience for stupid 4 wheelers in say dallas are almost gone. also snow never driven in snow. would i be able to get some well guided training when winter comes to help me or am i on my own there.. i know small stuff but with good reason i ask...

i will also say Trucking Truth has been the best website i have come across for imformation

not sure if i plug what i do but if you have any problems with your windshield leaking come to the local Freight here in town ill take care of you. for i know what you go through when it rains inside your truck....

thanks to all Bret. Guyjax, Jopa, and of course Starcar (love your to the point and no B.S lol) ok ill stop babbling..

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Rabbitt's Comment
member avatar

been sandbagging here for a few month reading and soaking up all the information i can. just some concerns about CDL company ran school. They charge Interest? Thinking on Stevens Transportation for school. Thought since your signing a 1 yr contract with said company your school is payed for.. Stevens is a state sponsored school. being a state sponsored school seem to be a bit illegal to charge so much for school...

atm trying to get caught up on bills before school. im an Auto Glass Installer and do all the Glass for you truckers out there at the local Freightliner dealer here in town.... according what im reading ill take a pay decrease or make the same pay in trucking the first year out.. at 50 my body tries to tell me im getting old but climb 10 rigs a week to replace some of your Glass for your drivers.. mind tells my body to stop whining and get er done....

a friend who is O/O lease told me to go with Stevens for he knows there training procedures get my year and he will get me my own truck afterwards..

also read that i may spend up to 2 years paying back my training... the work is not the issue. not married or have children so being gone would be like a vacation.

i have tons of concerns on my carrier change but like i said the body said enough is enough. i dont want to get more in debt at losing money my first yr.

i do understand i have to put my time in.. i also did ground handling of Private Jets for 17 yrs before doing Glass work and understand more then you know about heavy stuff and stopping rofl it say's i dont wanna.

also read that it be wise to have a couple of grand in the bank when your start out OTR for scales toles and such... i guess still doing glass because yes i do have a job and stay busy most of the time.. most times if i have some what some say are stupid question i hit the guys up at the local dealer.

also not sure what way i want to go. Reefer , dry van or even flatbed for once i get my yr in the doors are already open for me in these fields.

just dont want to stay broke the rest of my life and watch the grass grow in the field behind the house.. yes i have started The High Road Online CDL Training Program here.... (Bret dont go looking at my scores just yet.. my fault if get antsy an dont read the question correctly lol)

another very large concern. i grew up in Los angeles for 34yrs.. since i have been in this small town for almost 17 yrs i dont like the new overpasses and patience for stupid 4 wheelers in say dallas are almost gone. also snow never driven in snow. would i be able to get some well guided training when winter comes to help me or am i on my own there.. i know small stuff but with good reason i ask...

i will also say Trucking Truth has been the best website i have come across for imformation

not sure if i plug what i do but if you have any problems with your windshield leaking come to the local Freight here in town ill take care of you. for i know what you go through when it rains inside your truck....

thanks to all Bret. Guyjax, Jopa, and of course Starcar (love your to the point and no B.S lol) ok ill stop babbling..

sorry supposed to read say hey not have.... in the Header.

also forgot to mention thanks to OldSchool also

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

Jopa? What did he ever do besides make jokes!? shocked.pngsmile.gif

I hate to say it, but your O/O friend is digging you a grave.

Here's my advice.

Go to a Company-Sponsored Training . They don't charge you for anything, they just require you drive for them for at least a year. You won't spend two years, you'll spend a year getting that training paid off.

Also, do not become an O/O. You don't have experience, you won't survive out here. Believe me. Be a company driver and you'll make enough money and learn the industry. Once you learn the industry then you can truly decide what you want to do. I made 32K my first year, second year I'm looking at 42K.

Driving in the snow is no problem. You'll learn it in training, assuming you'll be in training during the winter months. If you start school in the Summer you'll be solo by the time the snow falls.

Honestly, your friend is giving you bad information you don't need and making stupid recommendations for you. Nothing wrong with Stevens, I'm talking about the O/O part. Managing your own business is a financial disaster waiting to happen out here and you can easily go bankrupt. You won't believe the repair bills we get out here. But it doesn't bother me because I'm a company driver. You want steady income, not an overwhelming amount of risks.

You also don't need a savings account for tolls and scales. Tolls are really only in OK/KS for major carriers. Scales are only 10$ and you get reimbursed.

Please, I urge you, stop taking your friends advice. You will drown in debt if you do. Become a company driver and don't take on those risks.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

been sandbagging here for a few month reading and soaking up all the information i can. just some concerns about CDL company ran school. They charge Interest? Thinking on Stevens Transportation for school. Thought since your signing a 1 yr contract with said company your school is payed for.. Stevens is a state sponsored school. being a state sponsored school seem to be a bit illegal to charge so much for school...

atm trying to get caught up on bills before school. im an Auto Glass Installer and do all the Glass for you truckers out there at the local Freightliner dealer here in town.... according what im reading ill take a pay decrease or make the same pay in trucking the first year out.. at 50 my body tries to tell me im getting old but climb 10 rigs a week to replace some of your Glass for your drivers.. mind tells my body to stop whining and get er done....

a friend who is O/O lease told me to go with Stevens for he knows there training procedures get my year and he will get me my own truck afterwards..

also read that i may spend up to 2 years paying back my training... the work is not the issue. not married or have children so being gone would be like a vacation.

i have tons of concerns on my carrier change but like i said the body said enough is enough. i dont want to get more in debt at losing money my first yr.

i do understand i have to put my time in.. i also did ground handling of Private Jets for 17 yrs before doing Glass work and understand more then you know about heavy stuff and stopping rofl it say's i dont wanna.

also read that it be wise to have a couple of grand in the bank when your start out OTR for scales toles and such... i guess still doing glass because yes i do have a job and stay busy most of the time.. most times if i have some what some say are stupid question i hit the guys up at the local dealer.

also not sure what way i want to go. Reefer , dry van or even flatbed for once i get my yr in the doors are already open for me in these fields.

just dont want to stay broke the rest of my life and watch the grass grow in the field behind the house.. yes i have started The High Road Online CDL Training Program here.... (Bret dont go looking at my scores just yet.. my fault if get antsy an dont read the question correctly lol)

another very large concern. i grew up in Los angeles for 34yrs.. since i have been in this small town for almost 17 yrs i dont like the new overpasses and patience for stupid 4 wheelers in say dallas are almost gone. also snow never driven in snow. would i be able to get some well guided training when winter comes to help me or am i on my own there.. i know small stuff but with good reason i ask...

i will also say Trucking Truth has been the best website i have come across for imformation

not sure if i plug what i do but if you have any problems with your windshield leaking come to the local Freight here in town ill take care of you. for i know what you go through when it rains inside your truck....

thanks to all Bret. Guyjax, Jopa, and of course Starcar (love your to the point and no B.S lol) ok ill stop babbling..

double-quotes-end.png

sorry supposed to read say hey not have.... in the Header.

also forgot to mention thanks to OldSchool also

you forgot me. shocked.png

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Rabbitt's Comment
member avatar

Jopa? What did he ever do besides make jokes!? shocked.pngsmile.gif

I hate to say it, but your O/O friend is digging you a grave.

Here's my advice.

Go to a Company-Sponsored Training . They don't charge you for anything, they just require you drive for them for at least a year. You won't spend two years, you'll spend a year getting that training paid off.

Also, do not become an O/O. You don't have experience, you won't survive out here. Believe me. Be a company driver and you'll make enough money and learn the industry. Once you learn the industry then you can truly decide what you want to do. I made 32K my first year, second year I'm looking at 42K.

Driving in the snow is no problem. You'll learn it in training, assuming you'll be in training during the winter months. If you start school in the Summer you'll be solo by the time the snow falls.

Honestly, your friend is giving you bad information you don't need and making stupid recommendations for you. Nothing wrong with Stevens, I'm talking about the O/O part. Managing your own business is a financial disaster waiting to happen out here and you can easily go bankrupt. You won't believe the repair bills we get out here. But it doesn't bother me because I'm a company driver. You want steady income, not an overwhelming amount of risks.

You also don't need a savings account for tolls and scales. Tolls are really only in OK/KS for major carriers. Scales are only 10$ and you get reimbursed.

Please, I urge you, stop taking your friends advice. You will drown in debt if you do. Become a company driver and don't take on those risks.

Daniel my friends has 2 leased trucks was going to put me in one just a an employee. not to lease. i have learned from here leasing a bad deal. im going to try and get him to buy his 3rd truck and not lease. im a freak about used trucks and there are millions out there ready to go without the headache of leasing...

yes i learnt it here lol but ty for catching another one of my Screw ups lol and on Jopa yep what i meant he does make me laugh alot also does come up with a few good points. lol

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Jopa's Comment
member avatar
yes i learnt it here lol but ty for catching another one of my Screw ups lol and on Jopa yep what i meant he does make me laugh alot also does come up with a few good points. lol

Thank you for the compliment . . . it is true I try to male light of the situation every chance I get . . . glad you got a couple of chuckles here and there . . .

Jopa

smile.gif

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