Biggest Week So Far 3410 Miles!

Topic 4290 | Page 1

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Chris L.'s Comment
member avatar

I'm 690 miles from my first drop in the Los Angeles area, I have 5 drops and two days to get them all off. I will then have 3410 payed miles for the week. My biggest week solo so far. Is this running hard? I feel like I worked much harder couple weeks ago when I got only 2800 miles because I was dropping and reloading daily with short loads.

Either way my DM is keeping me busy and I'm liking it.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
SOBER-J's Comment
member avatar

Yes driver you are running hard! That's what it's all about though right. You out there to make money. Get loads picked up and delivered. The economy depends on you and you are taking care of business! As I like to say you are "Being the Job."

Nobody should have a problem with that. However..... you just make sure that you are safe and legal. Been out there myself and I will tell you right now that you can run that many miles but you getting close to not being legal... possibly. Not saying your not running it safe and legal I have no idea what your runs have been. But I know and the other experienced drivers from this site know you may be pushing it.

You made a hell of a pay check this week. Do not try to get as much as you can get if it is not safe and legal. This is your career and your living. If you get caught doing something illegal it will be a major set back for weeks or months. Don't let your company push you harder than you want to run.

Once again I am not accusing you of anything just be careful. Because if the sh#$ hits the fan your dispatcher never told you to run that hard. Trust me that's what he or she will say. They will put all the blame on you. And you will be the one getting reprimanded or at worst let go. The dispatcher still going to have there job.

Trucking is a marathon not a sprint. Pace yourself. It's not worth a couple hundred dollars more a week if you don't get anymore weeks, right.

Let me just ask you a couple questions that could come up. Do your fuel stops match your log book? Especially if you have computer logs. Also, Do all your tolls match your logs? Do you have prepass for the scales? Does your logs match the times that the prepass let you go by the scales?

And again not making accusations just a bit curious. Just trying to let you know what to watch out for because, and this is the first question you asked. Yes your running hard. Like I said though if you are safe and legal.... no problem.

I'm Sober-J over

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
guyjax(Guy Hodges)'s Comment
member avatar

Before it goes much farther I thought I would through in 3400 miles is no where near being illegal. You can actually do 3800 to 3900 and still be within legal limits. Just remember not every truck goes 60 mph. Most are faster.

Justin N.'s Comment
member avatar

What is this about logging your prepass and tolls? I know about fueling but have never heard or gotten in any trouble for not logging these other two situations.

If I get the green light for prepassing the scales the last thing I want to do is stop so that I can put it in the remark section.

Ken C.'s Comment
member avatar

Nice week....Stay Safe

Ken

SOBER-J's Comment
member avatar

What is this about logging your prepass and tolls? I know about fueling but have never heard or gotten in any trouble for not logging these other two situations.

If I get the green light for prepassing the scales the last thing I want to do is stop so that I can put it in the remark section.

Ok sorry if I confused you. You don't have to stop and log it or flag it. Here's an example, your on the drive line from Christiansburg VA Which is mile marker 118 on I 81 And you left Christiansburg at 1:30PM You cross the scales in Troutville at mile marker 150 ( still in VA) that's roughly 30 minutes. If some one were trying to cheat the logs or "back log" there log book, (again if its not a computer log) they may have been waiting at a shipper or receiver or fuel or traffic earlier in the day. So to show on the log they got to Natural Bridge Va (marker 175) earlier than they actually did they would just say they left Cburg at 10:30AM instead of 1:30PM. And show no waiting at various places. But the prepass shows when you actually crossed. Now if there are no accident or incidents you probably would never hear anything about it.

So you could actually cross the scales at 2 PM but your log shows you crossed scales at 11AM. Again this would be if your not using computer logs. The computer will not let you cheat it that way.

Are you getting it? Basically if you have the "power of the pencil" or a paper log you can drive 60 miles an hour or 70 miles an hour if your truck runs that fast. If you were to start your day at 6AM and wait some where for whatever reason for 2,3, or even 4 hours that would just be eliminated then whenever you stop your not actually taking the full ten hour break which isn't legal.

Just saying. Big Brother is always watching.

Sober-J over

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

That's a big week Chris. Really nice.

Over the years I used to shoot for about 3000-3200 miles. I thought that was about perfect. It was hard running, you stayed busy, and had a great paycheck but you were still able to do it legally and get enough rest. I figured if I'm going to be out there I want to make all the money I can but in a way that's safe, sustainable, and fun. You don't want to burn out so you want to make sure you get enough rest and have some fun once in a while too. If it becomes too much of a grind it isn't worth it. There has to be a balance.

I'd say that was an awesome week but I wouldn't shoot for those kind of numbers consistently, even if they're available. Do what you can do at a sustainable pace. I think for most people the tipping point would be somewhere around that 3000 mile/week mark. Once you cross that threshold you're starting to push awfully hard.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Chris L.'s Comment
member avatar

Im on electronic logs. The only thing I do that might be considered cheating is sleep at a receiver and deliver off duty to keep from starting my clock, and I strap and tarp on sleeper birth as well.

I'm still new with Prime and I'm trying to prove myself to my DM , like you guys always say there's always enough miles for the good drivers.

I have been averaging around 2800 miles a week and I'm happy with those miles.

Electronic Logs:

Electronic Onboard Recorder

Electronic Logbook

A device which records the amount of time a vehicle has been driven. If the vehicle is not being driven, the operator will manually input whether or not he/she is on duty or not.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
David's Comment
member avatar

Im on electronic logs. The only thing I do that might be considered cheating is sleep at a receiver and deliver off duty to keep from starting my clock, and I strap and tarp on sleeper birth as well.

I'm still new with Prime and I'm trying to prove myself to my DM , like you guys always say there's always enough miles for the good drivers.

I have been averaging around 2800 miles a week and I'm happy with those miles.

Careful with the tarping while being in SB.. Thats a ticket waiting to happen.

I'd log Sleeper if I was told it would take a while to load me. But I'd do at least 15 min as On Duty to get paperwork turned in, and then switch to sleeper or if i could take a walk into town (if one was close enough) id log off duty. We where always told in class to "log it as you do it".

David

Electronic Logs:

Electronic Onboard Recorder

Electronic Logbook

A device which records the amount of time a vehicle has been driven. If the vehicle is not being driven, the operator will manually input whether or not he/she is on duty or not.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
SOBER-J's Comment
member avatar

That's right you can't tarp in the sleeper. This is just what I was trying to pull out of you. I ran flatbed and tarped loads and no how long it can take. Show at least 15 but 30 would be better. You should be fine.

Now we get to your miles the 70 hour rule and that you had five stops on that last run. Also now that I know your pulling flatbed makes all the difference in the world. Cause you got to do some type of unstrapping, unchaining, or untarping at each of those five stops and put the final pieces of your equipment away at the last stop. So even at 15 minutes at 5 stops that's over an hour. Then you have to have on duty time for your pretrip and fuel. That's why I was trying to get a little more info out of you.

We just here to watch out for you man. And help sharpen up your skills. These are the reasons I was asking the questions I did because I knew you were getting close. Yeah these guys and gals running teams can do 3800-3900 safe and legal but they mostly load and deliver runs that are over 1500 miles and its a lot of drop and hook. You not in that boat. Just saying big brothers watching.

You doing good man. You showed what your made of and your company sees it. They going to give you some good runs. Find you something fun to do you probably ready for restart after this anyway. Then next week you gone hit 3000 miles again.

Sounds to me like you "putting the butter on the biscuits and being the job"!

I', Sober-J over

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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