Questionable Backround

Topic 4640 | Page 1

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Ryan T.'s Comment
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Hey everyone i was just feeling a little discouraged because of some stupid stuff i did years ago and was wondering if anyone had advice on different companies who maybe didnt care so much about backround but still pays a decent wage. Im getting into the trucking industry to support my family and so far ive been turned down by midwest express, swift based on my backround and i feel its set the pace for most companies please someone tell me im wrong.

Jopa's Comment
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Ryan T.

Absolute best thing to do is apply online to some big companies (Prime, Swift, Central, Stevens) and then follow up right away by calling the recruiters at those companies. They can go over your application with you on the phone and answer ALL of your questions. Be honest and don't leave anything out. They have ways . . .

Jopa

smile.gif

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Angela M.'s Comment
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I have a criminal background with my last charge being 11 yrs ago. Celadon took me with no problem. The school is Quality Drivers.

Brett Aquila's Comment
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If you have any felony convictions or DUI's in the past 5 years it's going to be extremely difficult to find anyone that will give you a shot. If you have convictions and they're 7-10 years old or more you'll likely get a shot somewhere. It will depend on the number of charges and the nature of the charges also. Drug and theft related charges seem to be the worst ones to overcome.

All you can really do is apply like crazy everywhere and see what they say. Have you decided whether you want Company-Sponsored Training or private CDL training? Read through our Truck Driver's Career Guide if you're not sure which one wil suit you best.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

DUI:

Driving Under the Influence

Mason K.'s Comment
member avatar

I have two accidents, one my fault, last year and the year before that consecutively, Will C.R. England Hire me to train for the CDL? They said there might be a six month wait when I talked to them today, but I don't care...With the negative reviews I've heard about them I'm not nailing myself down to any 1 company yet.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Kai's Comment
member avatar

I have two accidents, one my fault, last year and the year before that consecutively, Will C.R. England Hire me to train for the CDL? They said there might be a six month wait when I talked to them today, but I don't care...With the negative reviews I've heard about them I'm not nailing myself down to any 1 company yet.

Hi

they are a good company with a good training program. If you have a chance to go with them, you should not hesitate. Even in Salt Lake City the school changed their staff and it is a good school now. The negative views are not always reliable information.

The Trainer Coordinators during your over the road training are good people. They work with you. If you are with a trainer that does not do his job, you can always ask them for another trainer. You can also request that you don't want to share a truck with a second student. They just don't like it when you don't communicate with them.

Remember, C R England is a Refrigerated Transport Company. Hauling temperature controlled freight is different from hauling a dry van. You will be driving long distances and your home time will be less compared to dry van. Temperature controlled freight is perishable freight. That means that if you wait too long, the freight may spoil or you deliver rotten and moldy carrots. C R England is a good company and a large company. If you are stuck on the road or a sick and are sure you can't deliver on time, they will send another driver with an empty trailer or just bobtail and you just swap the trailers. You just need to communicate well. If you don't say anything, you should not expect them to know you situation.

A lot of freight is touch freight and some are no touch freight, but drop and hook is very few. This is the nature of the freight. If you haul non-perishable goods such as furniture or applicances. You are not in a hurry to deliver. Usually, it is drop and hook.

Those who complain, usually arrive to school or orientation without preparation. They expect that they babysit them. Preparation prior to starting a career is important.

Just be careful with any Lease Program. If you don't know the market, you should not go that route. They might be a bit pushy, but they don't force it on you.

=======================

If you have a questionable background, it is important to communicate with the recruiters. Communication can make a difference. If your background requires you to wait because of DOT Regulations then there is not much you can do and the recruiter is also not able to do much. If your background is questionable with regards to Company Policy, but not with regards to DOT Regulations, then you should communicate with the recruiter in a polite manner.

Every recruiter is different. You might have a jackass on your phone. The next recuiter might be a very merciful recruiter who would give you second or even third chances. Even in the same company, you find different types of people. Some are conservative others think more liberal.

I know a person who applied at Knight for the Squire Program. The recruiter in Arizona did not accept his application, but the recruiter in his hometown would have been willing to hire him anytime. This local recruiter talked to the recruiter in Arizona. This did not change her mind due to stubborness. If you are able to walk in and speak with the recruiter personally, you might get a better result. However, the local recruiter told the applicant that he should find a small local company and drive for three months and then apply directly at the local terminal. He would gladly hire him. This shows that if it does not work with one recruiter then don't lose hope. Try it with another recruiter. Eventually, you will have a recruiter at the phone who is lenient and gives you a second chance.

However, if DOT Regulations require you to wait then they are not able to break that rule.

They can be lenient regarding Company Policies, but not concerning DOT Policies.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Bobtail:

"Bobtailing" means you are driving a tractor without a trailer attached.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Mason K.'s Comment
member avatar

Thank you very much. finally a positive review that didn't come from England! Yes The recruiter did mention they recently changed their policies. I don't care if i have to wait. I may also have a problem with hypertension , so that gives me some time to work on that, maybe even quit smoking! I don't wanna be so anxious about my first ride that I have a heart attack and keel over and drive a 40,000 pound truck into someones baby :-/

I remember my first driving exam in high school... everyone else got the ford focus... your fiat 500... your mini cooper... Me? no,no,no... I got their chevy montecarlo. I passed with better scores than most of them. I believe I was destined for this calling. My long term goal is to drive a log truck in Alaska <3 Maybe even a refer for England, I just don't want to rush this now... I've got the bug in my system and I've been known to be impulsive. I want to do this right and look good doing it. I want to become the best driver I can be and stop grinding bloody wheels on the curb...

Hypertension:

Abnormally high blood pressure.

Kai's Comment
member avatar

At C R England, they allow their trainers to choose and pick their trainee. Usually, they choose a trainee with a good GPA. The better your GPA after school the better chances you have to get a good trainer.

Remember, most of the trainers are Owner Operators or Lease Operators. Rarely, you have a company driver train you. The trainers are usually very experienced (15+ years). Sometimes, you might drive an old truck, because they owner operator bought his truck long time ago. This should not be a problem. If you can handle older truck, they you can handle new trucks even better.

You need to remember that Owner Operators also pay their trainee. Some Owner Operator Trainers even give bonus on their own. The company pays you a flat rate, but the trainer, if he is an owner operator, also gives you a pay.

I know a person who had a trainer who was an owner operator. He was successful. What he did was not just lease a truck. Throughout his career he bought 12 trucks. Now he has his own fleet with 12 trucks. He hires his own drivers who haul freight for him. He give his trainees bonus pay if they complete certain miles. You might even be eligible to drive for him someday.

Owner Operator:

An owner-operator is a driver who either owns or leases the truck they are driving. A self-employed driver.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Kai's Comment
member avatar

You need to make sure if you hometown is a good location for C R England. They mostly drive along the I-80 and I-40 and somewhere between. With Refigerated Freight you might experience more down time than with dry van.

I am going with Celadon by the way and start their Quality Driving School in Laredo, TX, 8th of September. I think starting my career with dry van is preferable for me personally. Taking care of the reefer additionally would not be a big problem, but with dry van I don't have to do that.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Mason K.'s Comment
member avatar

Going to look at CSX intermodal next then Kennesaw Transportation.

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

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