Trucker/Driving Etiquette

Topic 4890 | Page 1

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:
Steven N. (aka Wilson)'s Comment
member avatar

Being a brand-new rookie, I have noticed there are things you do while driving that are considered polite driving practices. The other day, I was driving along minding my own business and I had the truck pegged at the governed speed I could go. Eventually, I come up to another truck that is doing perhaps 2 MPH slower than I was. Well, I didn't want to go slower so I patiently waited for an adequate opening to pass and I started to pass him. It took awhile to pass him, especially with the gentle rolling hills that were present. Once I was past him, I got back over into the right lane and started to mind my own business again when a truck that got behind me at some point passed me and blowing his road horn at me. I am thinking he may have been an O/O since his truck did not seem to be governed. Whether he was an O/O or not, he was very irate at me for taking *too* long to pass.

So I am thinking that I broke some kind of sacred etiquette law or something, shocked.png hence this post.

What are these etiquette laws? I know all of you experienced drivers know them and probably practice them all the time. But I don't know them. Please comment on my passing a slower truck and also please list as many of these etiquette rules as you all can think of. I would like to be in compliance as a rookie.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Mikki 's Comment
member avatar

GREATsmile.gif question! I look forward to many responses.

Christopher W.'s Comment
member avatar

Passing works this way.

Some trucks are governed, some are not(which you already know this). This can sometimes make it difficult and frustrating for drivers who are on a two-lane road. I worked for Swift in a truck that was roughly governed at 62mph. The average speed limit on most of these interstates is 65-70, so I have a bunch of other drivers out there who have their trucks governed to 65+.

Now imagine the difference between a truck that's going 63'ish and another drive who is traveling a little over 2mph is trying to pass you. Reasonably, you're going just a little under 200ft slower than he is every minute. Maximum truck lengths for your average 53' is 80ft, so it can take around 15 seconds, more or less, to pass that vehicle. Now, a lot can happen within 15 seconds and you'll typically come across a hill or a blindspot that could hold a surprise.

When this kind of scenario is playing out, it's typically safe and polite to slow down just a little and let the other vehicle pass. They'll flash their trailer lights to don that they are thankful for your courtesy and mindful driving.

Let's also say that you have a vehicle fast approaching you and you're about to attempt a pass on a slightly slower vehicle than yours. You should just let them pass first because you're being a roadhog and a lot of these governed trucks will not slow down to let you pass typically. Only pass when it is safe to do so and not impeding traffic or faster trucks.

Don't do this for courtesy sake, but keep in mind that something bad can happen if the other truck is driving in the wrong lane. Also, always keep in the right lane.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

David's Comment
member avatar

Passing works this way.

Some trucks are governed, some are not(which you already know this). This can sometimes make it difficult and frustrating for drivers who are on a two-lane road. I worked for Swift in a truck that was roughly governed at 62mph. The average speed limit on most of these interstates is 65-70, so I have a bunch of other drivers out there who have their trucks governed to 65+.

Now imagine the difference between a truck that's going 63'ish and another drive who is traveling a little over 2mph is trying to pass you. Reasonably, you're going just a little under 200ft slower than he is every minute. Maximum truck lengths for your average 53' is 80ft, so it can take around 15 seconds, more or less, to pass that vehicle. Now, a lot can happen within 15 seconds and you'll typically come across a hill or a blindspot that could hold a surprise.

When this kind of scenario is playing out, it's typically safe and polite to slow down just a little and let the other vehicle pass. They'll flash their trailer lights to don that they are thankful for your courtesy and mindful driving.

Let's also say that you have a vehicle fast approaching you and you're about to attempt a pass on a slightly slower vehicle than yours. You should just let them pass first because you're being a roadhog and a lot of these governed trucks will not slow down to let you pass typically. Only pass when it is safe to do so and not impeding traffic or faster trucks.

Don't do this for courtesy sake, but keep in mind that something bad can happen if the other truck is driving in the wrong lane. Also, always keep in the right lane.

Pretty much sums it up.

Typically when I would drive and have a truck fast approaching, I would turn off cruise when they enter the othernlane and just coast until they clears me, flash my lights for them to get over and hit my resume button. No prob.

You will get these drivers out there that think they own the road and your slow ass is making them late. Just brush em off, continue to roll and be on your way.

Never flash your high beams at night when a truck is passing you. It really hurts the eyes... A quick tap of the lights off is sufficient.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

TxsGent's Comment
member avatar

Note to selfc flashing high beams bad.

Since I haven't driven a truck YET, this question is interesting from a POV perspective as well. I always try to be a curtious and safe driver. Since I can't turn my tail lights off after passing, I switch my turn signal left right a couple of times to say thanks for the "safe to get back over" signal.

Rolling Thunder's Comment
member avatar

If you are a rookie, just make sure you have a lot of space... a lot... like a half mile or more... before you pull into the hammer lane.

Chris L.'s Comment
member avatar

I think if you are entering the hwy and a truck moves left to make room for you, you should let them back over afterwards. I did this and there was a truck in front of me going about 61 and I'm governed at 62 and the truck that just entered pulled up beside me so I couldn't get back over and had to proceed to pass the other truck which took awhile and cars and other trucks stacked up behind me.

David's Comment
member avatar

I think if you are entering the hwy and a truck moves left to make room for you, you should let them back over afterwards. I did this and there was a truck in front of me going about 61 and I'm governed at 62 and the truck that just entered pulled up beside me so I couldn't get back over and had to proceed to pass the other truck which took awhile and cars and other trucks stacked up behind me.

Thats a tricky situation. even in my personal car ( VW Beetle runs at 60-65MPH) If im getting on and a truck slides over, I tend to slow down enough for them to get over safely and then I'll proceed to get up to 60...

Terry C.'s Comment
member avatar

In the years I drove before my hiatus, I never drove a governed truck. Now since I've been back and doing my 40k training with Prime, I'm driving a 65mph truck. I was driving at the governed speed for the first couple of weeks and was constantly stressed every time I got behind a 63~64 mph truck, worrying about the time it would take to pass and listening to other drivers complain on the cb when I'd pass. I don't drive against the governor anymore and two things have happened. I don't have anywhere near the amount of stress cuz I drive at 60 or below and can quickly pass any slower vehicle I encounter which isn't near as many. And the fuel millage has gone up almost 1mpg. So bottom line is if you don't want to stress about passing etiquette and ****y drivers, don't drive against the governor. This imho is better advise than passing etiquette.

But as etiquette goes it's kind of a two way street. Personally if another truck is taking a long time to pass me, I back out of it and let the pass happen more quickly. Something I've seen next to no-one else doing. Seems like most drivers will fight getting passed to the bitter end. And even in the short time I've been in a governed truck driving for a major training carrier, I've come across truck's going slower, got over to pass and had them speed up and not let me, only to slow back down again and do the same thing if I got In the left lane to pass again. That's happened a few times. I don't understand the mentality of the drivers that do that. I assume it's because of the name on the wind damn, doors and trailer. But whatever.

Steven N. (aka Wilson)'s Comment
member avatar

I think if you are entering the hwy and a truck moves left to make room for you, you should let them back over afterwards. I did this and there was a truck in front of me going about 61 and I'm governed at 62 and the truck that just entered pulled up beside me so I couldn't get back over and had to proceed to pass the other truck which took awhile and cars and other trucks stacked up behind me.

Now this happened to me today, not only with another truck, but also with 4-wheelers. You see them entering from the on ramp to merge and you know you have to get over to let them in. Then they pull up along side of you and you can't get back over.

About fighting the governor, that is an interesting concept. I may just try that for a week or two to see how it is.

Are there any other instances of trucking etiquette besides passing? Like in the truck stops or other situations?

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More