For The Newbies Out There That Want To Know What Roehl Offers; This Is What I Have Experienced.

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Mthrsupior aka Julia Bals's Comment
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Hello TT forum,

I just wanted to check in with you and I want to put some information out there about what I've experienced with my company. I've been getting caught up with all of your posts, and I keep seeing a lot of questions or comments about what companies have to offer. I don't know what the other companies have to offer, but I can tell you what I have experienced with Roehl so far...

There have been a few questions asked about employment history.

For me, I had earned a degree and went to work as a Nuclear Medicine Technologist for a consistent 10 years before relocating to PA; at which time, I decided to stay home and give my family time to adjust to the big move. I did not work and had no work history for a period of 4 years after the move. Then I went back to work for about an 8 month period in a customer service job not related to my degree, when I decided to go to school for my CDL.

Roehl did verify my employment with the most recent company, and my last employer before the move, and I had to submit a statement and give references that could verify what I was doing for the 4 years I was home; but I simply stated that I was home taking care of my family during that time. They did not have a problem with my lack of employment, as long as I could verify what I was doing during that time off.

Because I have a family: a husband of 19 years, and three children ages 17, 15, and 11; I went with Roehl for the following reasons:

1. No up front costs for school, except transportation and living expenses while at school for 3 weeks. The company sponsored school was financed entirely through them, and once I have completed 120,000 miles will not have to pay back. The drawback is that it was only a 3 week course, was very fast paced and really didn't cover all that it should have, but it did allow me to get my CDL A, PDQ which was what I needed for the family.

2. Only two weeks of being with a trainer. For me, it ended up being three weeks. The reason mine was a week longer is because I had taken a curve too short and got my rear tandems stuck in the snow, and had to have a tow truck pull me out. Not an accident, but enough to warrant a few extra days with a trainer for "close quarter maneuvers" training. I was happy to have the extra days training, but the norm is two weeks with a trainer. Again, the perk is less time away from home, the downside is that I didn't really feel like I was ready to be on my own after such a relatively short amount of time.

3. The final phase of training is only 6 weeks of OTR driving with your "training dispatcher" after which, you can transfer to the fleet of your choice. Most other companies require 6 months of OTR experience before they will let you go to the fleet of your choice. This didn't really have any drawbacks to it. The way they work it, is: you are out for 11-14 days and you get 2-3 days off. The longer you are out the more hometime you earn. So when I was out for 3 weeks with my trainer, I got 5 days hometime before I had to start my 6 weeks of national. I did 3 cycles of this to get my 6 weeks of OTR experience and was then transferred to the fleet of my choice.

4. They have several different hometime programs. The one I chose is a 7/7, where I am out for 7 days, then home for 7 days. This worked out for me, because I have a husband with a steady income, and can afford to work "part-time"; and because it is allowing me to get reacquainted with my family again. Even though I was out the least amount of time possible in this industry, it has still been a big transition for my family. They also have a 14/7 and a 7/4 & 7/3 plan and of course the national plan, and some dedicated/regional routes. I'm telling you all this because I have had a lot of people asking me what I thought of Roehl? Would I recommend them? Are they a good company? These are the reasons I went with Roehl, and if asked, I would tell you that, yes I recommend them; but only if what they have to offer is what works best for you!

Please take Brett's advice and pick a company because it is the best fit for you; and understand that it is your attitude that determines how happy you are with a company, not how "good" the company is.

In my case, I have been very happy with my experience thus far.

Brett, I still love trucking!smile.gif

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

BMI:

Body mass index (BMI)

BMI is a formula that uses weight and height to estimate body fat. For most people, BMI provides a reasonable estimate of body fat. The BMI's biggest weakness is that it doesn't consider individual factors such as bone or muscle mass. BMI may:

  • Underestimate body fat for older adults or other people with low muscle mass
  • Overestimate body fat for people who are very muscular and physically fit

It's quite common, especially for men, to fall into the "overweight" category if you happen to be stronger than average. If you're pretty strong but in good shape then pay no attention.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Scott L.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks for sharing this info! I'm also looking to get into Roehl here shortly. I'm just waiting to hear back on getting into their school, which should be in a few days. I have a buddy that drove for them and he liked it. Sounds like a solid starter company, and good training from what I've read online. Feel free to share any other experiences about them you'd like! I can't wait to get started! What division did you choose? I'm thinking van regional.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Ryan S.'s Comment
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Thanks for the awesome info Julia!

Houkie's Comment
member avatar

Thanks for sharing that info with us! I'm trying to get on with Prime but I'm still looking at other companies too in case Prime doesn't work out. :)

Dave D. (Armyman)'s Comment
member avatar

What are the answers to the "Roehl Survey"?

Dave

Scott L.'s Comment
member avatar

What are the answers to the "Roehl Survey"?

Dave

I took that survey last week. Strange! I wanted to select several answers for all the questions. I think they were looking for the 1st thing we'd choose I guess. Anyway, talked with my recruiter today and I'm good to go! As soon as my physical is done and back, I start school! I decided to do the van/national route to start out with. Starts at .32/mile and will be at .36/mile after 4 months. SNI was around .28/mile.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Mthrsupior aka Julia Bals's Comment
member avatar

Dave, We've had a lot of discussions about the survey, and as you know, it is a personality test. There are no right answers, it is just a tool that some pencil pusher in the office thinks will help them to determine who will be a good candidate to be an employee for their company. It is useless, and will eventually be replaced with something that makes more sense; but until then, unfortunately, some very qualified people, like you, will be turned down, and of course, some really undeserving people will be accepted. It's really a shame, and is truly the only thing that I would like to see changed across the entire industry.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Please take Brett's advice and pick a company because it is the best fit for you; and understand that it is your attitude that determines how happy you are with a company, not how "good" the company is.

In my case, I have been very happy with my experience thus far.

Thanks so much for the awesome update!!!! I love when people come back here to report how things are going and verify for others coming into the industry soon that what we're saying is true - stop wasting your time trying to decide if companies are "good companies" or "bad companies". Instead, understand that every company is looking for the same thing - drivers that work hard, have a great attitude, and are safe and reliable. Those are the drivers that companies count on to get the job done. Those are the drivers that get great miles and get treated fairly. Those are the drivers that will be happy at pretty much any company that suits them well, and that's what you should be looking for...a company that suits you well. Look at the type of freight they haul, their equipment, their home time policies, and their pay & benefits. A "good company" is a company that seems to offer what you're looking for in those areas. If you find a company that suits you well and you go in there and show them you're going to conduct yourself like a true professional in every way, you're going to do just fine there.

It is most definitely your work ethic, attitude, safety, and reliability that will determine whether or not you get good miles and fair treatment, not the company itself. All companies have great miles available. All companies are able to get their drivers home on time most of the time. And all companies are willing to do some special favors for their best drivers from time to time. You have to prove you're one of the true professionals that deserves that kind of treatment.

Brett, I still love trucking!

That's awesome to hear!!! Trucking is such a tough way to make a living but can also be incredibly rewarding and fun at the same time. If you're the right person for the job, it's an amazing experience!!!

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Charles C.'s Comment
member avatar
4. They have several different hometime programs. The one I chose is a 7/7, where I am out for 7 days, then home for 7 days. This worked out for me, because I have a husband with a steady income, and can afford to work "part-time"; and because it is allowing me to get reacquainted with my family again. Even though I was out the least amount of time possible in this industry, it has still been a big transition for my family. They also have a 14/7 and a 7/4 & 7/3 plan and of course the national plan

Nice update Julia but I have a question...doing the 7 on 7 off thing I would guess you are slip seating? and if so do you drop the truck at a terminal? or how does that work. and wat about the 7/3 and 7/4 plans do you take the truck home with those or not? tanks in advance chuck.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Steven A.'s Comment
member avatar

I just an offer of employment with them, they sent me for my physical on friday. They let me pick what fleet i wanted already. i picked refrig fleet. I also am curious about the 7/7 do they slip seat. The person i have dealt with has been very nice. I retired from fire department a year ago, divorced and ready for new adventure. They are waiting on me to tell them when i want to report for orientation.

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