Best Company To Work For Home Time Starting Out

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Dustyn A.'s Comment
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I'm going to be starting out in trucking soon and I was wondering what companies in Colorado that hire new drivers out of school have the best home times? And do local companies like Pepsi and Frito Lay hire with no very little experience?

Heavy C's Comment
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First of welcome dustyn. As far as home time i believe Roehl has the best. 7 out 7 home. Problem with this is you'll never make any money. And as far as local yes you can find someone who well take you on. Igot a local job right out of school. In fact i had three offers. Your best bet will be food service companies, dairys, etc. It's definitely going to be more physically demanding then hauling a dry van from door to door. When You get your license apply to every single place you can even if they are asking for experience. And make phone calls. You just never know until you try.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Phil C.'s Comment
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Good advice Heavy C. I would also add to check out earth moving and construction companies. This is where I ended up getting my first break.

Phil

Woody's Comment
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A little more detail in what your looking for would be helpful. What do you consider to be good home time? I came out of school and started with Knight transportation because of the home time they offered. I was originally going to do the 7/3 7/4 but decided against it before I went solo. For one I didn't feel I could make enough money. For two with this type of position you will be slip seating, meaning other people drive the truck when your home. I have no problem slip seating, it is what I do now. But I drive day cabs now and sleep in hotels, I did not want to slip seat in a sleeper cab and have to share a mattress with someone that may not take a shower the entire time they are out.

I ended up on a program that was out for 10 to 14 and then home 3-4. It worked pretty well for me but I tried to stay closer to the 10. One thing you need to know is even though you start a plan like this many of the companies will push you to see if you make them stick to the plan. Yes there may be times they have trouble getting you home due to freight but some times they may intentionally test the waters to see if you complain. I held them to the plan and they got me home regularly. Two of the new drivers I knew from school did not push like I did and was usually out 3 to 5 weeks at a time.

You may also want to look into LTL companies. With the current driver shortages some companies are hiring straight out of school that would normally require at least one to two years experience. I'm talking about companies like Old Dominion, YRC, Conway, just to name a few. You will typically get home much more often and it typically pays more.

Welcome to the forum.

Woody

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Day Cab:

A tractor which does not have a sleeper berth attached to it. Normally used for local routes where drivers go home every night.

Dustyn A.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks for the responses! I'm going to try to apply to as many places as possible.

A little more detail in what your looking for would be helpful. What do you consider to be good home time? I came out of school and started with Knight transportation because of the home time they offered. I was originally going to do the 7/3 7/4 but decided against it before I went solo. For one I didn't feel I could make enough money. For two with this type of position you will be slip seating, meaning other people drive the truck when your home. I have no problem slip seating, it is what I do now. But I drive day cabs now and sleep in hotels, I did not want to slip seat in a sleeper cab and have to share a mattress with someone that may not take a shower the entire time they are out.

I ended up on a program that was out for 10 to 14 and then home 3-4. It worked pretty well for me but I tried to stay closer to the 10. One thing you need to know is even though you start a plan like this many of the companies will push you to see if you make them stick to the plan. Yes there may be times they have trouble getting you home due to freight but some times they may intentionally test the waters to see if you complain. I held them to the plan and they got me home regularly. Two of the new drivers I knew from school did not push like I did and was usually out 3 to 5 weeks at a time.

You may also want to look into LTL companies. With the current driver shortages some companies are hiring straight out of school that would normally require at least one to two years experience. I'm talking about companies like Old Dominion, YRC, Conway, just to name a few. You will typically get home much more often and it typically pays more.

Welcome to the forum.

Woody

Thanks for the info on Knight! They are my top choice for companies that are not local when I graduate. Do they offer they they 7/3 right away for new drivers? The recruiter I talked to only told me the 10-14 and 3-4 part. I'm not really looking to make a lot of money as home time is very important to me, just enough to have a comfortable living. Also you said you drive day cabs and sleep in hotels, do they pay for the hotel for you and do they offer that for newbies as well? Do you have any other advice or knowledge on Knight, are they a good company to work for? I live in Colorado and one of the top reasons I'm considering them is because they have a center out of Denver so I'm hoping they do a lot of freight in and around Colorado.

Thanks!

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Day Cab:

A tractor which does not have a sleeper berth attached to it. Normally used for local routes where drivers go home every night.

Brian 's Comment
member avatar

I would check with Werner, they have terminal near Denver, and have dedicated routes available to new drivers.

I'm in the Minneapolis/ St Paul area and have been offered a Walmart dedicated route starting at .35cpm, with a $5000 sign on bonus, tuition reimbursement and home every 5 days!

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dedicated Route:

A driver or carrier who transports cargo between regular, prescribed routes. Normally it means a driver will be dedicated to working for one particular customer like Walmart or Home Depot and they will only haul freight for that customer. You'll often hear drivers say something like, "I'm on the Walmart dedicated account."

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Woody's Comment
member avatar

Thanks for the info on Knight! They are my top choice for companies that are not local when I graduate. Do they offer they they 7/3 right away for new drivers? The recruiter I talked to only told me the 10-14 and 3-4 part. I'm not really looking to make a lot of money as home time is very important to me, just enough to have a comfortable living. Also you said you drive day cabs and sleep in hotels, do they pay for the hotel for you and do they offer that for newbies as well? Do you have any other advice or knowledge on Knight, are they a good company to work for? I live in Colorado and one of the top reasons I'm considering them is because they have a center out of Denver so I'm hoping they do a lot of freight in and around Colorado.

Thanks!

Working 7/3 with most of the companies as a new driver and making a comfortable living is going to totally depend on your definition of comfortable living. I should clarify that it is not even an option with most companies. Knight offered this type of set up right out of the gate but I didn't press the issue. I would assume they have to have enough drivers in the program to rotate the truck and keep it moving so that could be a factor on availability.

I no longer work for Knight, I have switched to an LTL company driving linehaul. Yes my company pays for the hotels, as I'm pretty sure all LTL companies do for linehaul drivers.

You have to know what you want out of being a driver. I went linehaul for the pay/benefits and to be able to be home more often. I am currently home every other day and if I go to the extra board I will not be out more than 3 days at a time. I also make about twice as much as I did before. That being said, it is more like a job than going OTR and there are things that I seriously miss about driving over the road.

Woody

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Day Cab:

A tractor which does not have a sleeper berth attached to it. Normally used for local routes where drivers go home every night.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

AJ D.'s Comment
member avatar

Schneider has a 14 / 7 plan as well. They use a setup called a "Pod" where three drivers from an area share 1 truck. This could magnify some problems mentioned by a previous poster.

I went with Roehl because of the 14 / 7 plan that will be coming on line at the completion of the Nashville terminal. I am going OTR my first six months, mainly because there is not much to do on the farm in the winter and this will give me the most down time to practice things and stay fairly well rested. I will not be in a hurry during my rookie year keeping safety and rest forefront. The more I think about OTR the more excited I get. I have always wanted to see the country and when is better time than when learning the ropes of a trucker !

LTL line haul is my ultimate career destination but I didn't want to jump into that fast paced gig just yet. I will get 1 year under my belt and choose the company I want.

With line haul, you will need to be within reasonable commuting distance. 50 miles seems to be the gauge there.

Great thread ... we need to keep this going. Besides money, this is a new truckers main concern, I would think ....

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Line Haul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Chris L.'s Comment
member avatar

I went to Sygma Network straight out of school. I live in Portland but they have have terminals all over. If you don't mind working hard, you will unload the whole trailer by hand truck out a side door down a ramp.

I had two full days off at home and one layover at home every week. When your out on route they put you up in hotels. Great money to start. My experiences are with the Clackamas Oregon location, but I would think the others are similar.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dustyn A.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks for all the great replies!! I actually called Werner and they say have dedicated routes out of school in Colorado so they are a top choice besides Knight. I'm also going to look into other truck when I get closer to graduation.

Dedicated Route:

A driver or carrier who transports cargo between regular, prescribed routes. Normally it means a driver will be dedicated to working for one particular customer like Walmart or Home Depot and they will only haul freight for that customer. You'll often hear drivers say something like, "I'm on the Walmart dedicated account."

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