Quality Drivers Update....

Topic 5883 | Page 1

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Adam P.'s Comment
member avatar

I am still here doing everything. I can do to get thru the first part of training. I asked each instructor what all I need to do so I can move on to the next phase of training. .. . The most important thing that I was told was to slow down and take my time on the range and while driving. I needed to know Where I was at in the lane at all times plus I needed to learn how to make each angle better while I am doing my backing and pull ups. . . Plus I talked to each driving instructor, and told them that I needed help on my down shifting and my double clutching , and I am glad to say that I am showing improvement. .. . I know that I am not ready to test out yet, and in a way I am glad that I came up here now instead of being rushed all the time and not really learning everything that I need to know beforehand, and being forced to test out and not make it.. . . It takes time to learn something correctly, especially when I plan to be out on the roads,I want to be able to do my job in a safe manner... .. So. Quality. Drivers. Turned out to be the best choice that I made.I really feel that They can help me reach my goal on obtaining my CDL ,and I know they can help others as well..If you come here just give yourself some time and everything will work out.... . Until next time....

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Double Clutching:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

That's awesome to hear Adam! You're definitely taking the right approach to learning this trade and getting through their program. The instructors want to see people who take learning seriously and show they truly care about becoming a safe, productive driver. You'll get much better treatment, more attention from the instructors, and more leeway with mistakes when you have a great attitude like that so keep it up! And keep us posted!

smile.gif

Adam P.'s Comment
member avatar

I finished my training at Quality Drivers around Thanksgiving, passed my CDL. And I had to do a road test with Celadon, and a 90 degree backing test.. I passed my driving test and did not do so good on my backing test.

I decided to go home for Thanksgiving, since I have not been home since the last week of August.. Yes it took that long to go thru training. I went back up to Indy, and worked on my backing, and I passed everything and went to orientation at Celadon ..

That part did not take too long, I was put in a dorm room at the terminal , till they found a trainer for me, which took a week of waiting..and yes I had a bed to sleep in, a roof over my head, and food to eat, but I was reaching the point to where I was going to jump ship and start calling other trucking compaines since I had my CDL ,

I got a call from my driver advocate Friday morning telling me I had a trainer for my 10 ,000 miles of training..I packed up, and waited for my trainer to get there.

I was expecting some road time that day, instead I ended up driving 74 miles to a loves truck stop , so my trainer could go hone on the weekend, and yes I am sitting here in the truck waiting till Monday so I can get on the road..

I should be able to get a load to my home state for Christmas, And stay there for a week while my trainer comes back up here.. That way I will have time to get my CD changed over to my state.

The training pay is going to be 18 cents a mile for 10,000 miles, and after that time I will go back to Indy for another road test, and another 90 degree backing test.

Once I pass that, I will be put in with another student for 120,000 miles or 6 months of team driving where I am going to get paid 15 cents a rolling mile where I am getting paid 15 cents a mile for the miles I drive an 15 cents a mile for the miles my team member drives.

I guess I have to pay back for my free CDL school, my free CDL, my free room and board. Plus all the free food I ate..

I guess we all have to pay our dues, but I am going to count my blessings, I do have my CDL...

So in about 7 months I will have my $7,200.00 training program paid off. And I will be able to get another job someplace else.

But in all since it took me so long to get to this point in time. I lost just about everything that I had..

Until next time I hope everyone has a safe and happy Christmas, and a happy new year😎😎😎

Now. Would I have done it all over again????? Would you?? Let's give a recap .. It took about 10 weeks to get my CDL not 3 TO 4 weeks.. Each week the school brought in 50 to 80 new students.

I had 17 days to where I was not on the list to do anything not including the weekend, and holidays..most of the range trucks broke down often..

And here I sit with all of these other companies that offer more money starting out and tuition reimbursement.... Mmmmm. Makes me want to go talk to other drivers... Have a great one..😎😎😎

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
I was expecting some road time that day, instead I ended up driving 74 miles to a loves truck stop , so my trainer could go hone on the weekend, and yes I am sitting here in the truck waiting till Monday so I can get on the road..

That sucks! Man, your first thought must have been, "You've gotta be kidding me!!!"

But listen, that's trucking. I once sat for 8 days in a hotel in Albuquerque while the local dealership continuously lied to us about being able to get the parts needed to fix it. Turns out because it was an experimental Volvo the parts needed had to be custom made in Sweden. So they put me on a bus to Oklahoma City where I was given a different truck and sent back to Albuquerque to retrieve my belongings out of the old truck. So don't think you're stuck with a bad company or you're being treated unfairly or any of that. You're simply experiencing the "hurry up and wait" nature of trucking where you're either running so hard your eyes are crossing or you're sitting around so much you're afraid your license will expire before you can get moving again. You just have to continue to be patient, learn all you can, and roll with it.

I guess we all have to pay our dues, but I am going to count my blessings, I do have my CDL...

So in about 7 months I will have my $7,200.00 training program paid off. And I will be able to get another job someplace else.

Indeed you should be counting your blessings. Because I honestly don't know another industry in this country where a company will take you off the street, train you on their dime, and then guarantee you a job if you complete the training. If you can find that anywhere else I'd love to hear about it. It's an amazing blessing.

Now. Would I have done it all over again????? Would you?? Let's give a recap .. It took about 10 weeks to get my CDL not 3 TO 4 weeks.. Each week the school brought in 50 to 80 new students.

I had 17 days to where I was not on the list to do anything not including the weekend, and holidays..most of the range trucks broke down often..

And here I sit with all of these other companies that offer more money starting out and tuition reimbursement.... Mmmmm. Makes me want to go talk to other drivers... Have a great one...

That is why we generally tell people that if they can afford an Independent Truck Driving School then it's preferable to a Company-Sponsored Training Program. But wouldn't that make sense? I mean, at an independent school you're paying for the training up front out of your own pocket. In a company-sponsored program you're basically begging for an opportunity to "make the team". In one case you have all of the leverage, in the other case you have none.

The bottom line is that every decision in life is a compromise. You can't expect to have empty pockets and be treated like a king. You can't expect to be a rookie and be treated like a Hall of Famer. Showing up with empty pockets and asking a company to not only pay for your training but also take all of the risk of doing so is asking more than any company in any other industry is willing to do.

I had 17 days to where I was not on the list to do anything not including the weekend, and holidays..most of the range trucks broke down often..

The fact that you're sitting around thinking about that kind of stuff is not a good sign to be honest. You're not counting your blessings, you're displaying your sense of entitlement. I mean, not only do they have to pay for your training and take all of the risk, neither of which you were willing or able to do, but they also have to keep you busy every single day, put you in a nice hotel, train you as efficiently as possible, and God knows what else. I mean, what have you done to deserve anything from them? Nothing. They're fronting the money, trucks, trainers, hotel room, and taking all of the risk. I mean, talk about looking a gift horse in the mouth!

So yes, your training could have happened more quickly. You could have had your choice of companies after graduating from school. You could have made more money straight out of the gate. But that would have required paying for the schooling up front which I'm assuming you couldn't afford. But instead of sitting on unemployment crying the blues while your life wastes away you're being trained by this company with no money out of pocket for a new career and you're being guaranteed a job with a company that so desperately wants to keep you around that they'll have you sign a contract to do it.

Where's the downside????

You may have heard me say this before but it's worth repeating...the initial training is the easy part. Wait until you're out on the road by yourself running solo and every 30 minutes you're coming across yet another situation you have no idea how to handle. It's really hard. On top of that there are a million things that have to go right in order to have a smooth day. The truck can't break down, dispatch can't screw up, traffic has to flow, the weather has to cooperate - you have to keep a positive attitude and perspective or you're going to be miserable. Everyday life in the trucking industry is full of opportunities to be miserable or to be happy. Your perspective will make a world of difference.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

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