Night Driving Vs. Day Driving

Topic 5939 | Page 1

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DeJuan J.'s Comment
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Which do yall prefer? Driving at night or during the day?

HAMMERTIME's Comment
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Which do yall prefer? Driving at night or during the day?

Mix of both, Day starts at 2am or 3am and half my day is done by the time everyone wakes up. 2pm I shut her down and call it good.

6 string rhythm's Comment
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If forced to choose either or, then day. Night time is good for less traffic, weigh stations not being open as much, that's pretty much it. I'm a linehaul driver and am currently on a day schedule. I used to be on a strict night schedule and it was tough. The body naturally wants to sleep at night. It doesn't matter how much rest you get during the day sometimes - you're still prone to hit that wall at night. Some nights I could manage well. Some nights, no matter how much rest I got during the day, I still would hit a wall where about the only thing that would help was pulling over and resting my eyes for a short period. I'd take fighting traffic any time over having to deal with that certain tired feeling that would come during the night. Being sleepy or a bit drowsy during the day is much more manageable than the feeling of having to pull over somewhere during the night because you're afraid you might fall asleep at the wheel. Plus, at night you don't have a good field of vision in front of you while driving, especially during inclement weather. I like being able to see well in front of me, and being able to take in the scenery while driving is part of the fun. You don't get to see much at night.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

DeJuan J.'s Comment
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If forced to choose either or, then day. Night time is good for less traffic, weigh stations not being open as much, that's pretty much it. I'm a linehaul driver and am currently on a day schedule. I used to be on a strict night schedule and it was tough. The body naturally wants to sleep at night. It doesn't matter how much rest you get during the day sometimes - you're still prone to hit that wall at night. Some nights I could manage well. Some nights, no matter how much rest I got during the day, I still would hit a wall where about the only thing that would help was pulling over and resting my eyes for a short period. I'd take fighting traffic any time over having to deal with that certain tired feeling that would come during the night. Being sleepy or a bit drowsy during the day is much more manageable than the feeling of having to pull over somewhere during the night because you're afraid you might fall asleep at the wheel. Plus, at night you don't have a good field of vision in front of you while driving, especially during inclement weather. I like being able to see well in front of me, and being able to take in the scenery while driving is part of the fun. You don't get to see much at night.

Well said!!! I want to be able to start my day around 3:00am-4:00am also.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Snappy's Comment
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Well, everyone is wired different. Left to my own devices, I would get to bed around 6 am, sleep til about 2 pm, and be up all night. I was lucky enough to find a potential team member who likes to be up in time to remind the rooster to crow! I'm pretty excited about teaming. That, and I love driving at night... as long as I don't come across too many rats with horns. Most people call them deer. Gosh I hate deer.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

6 string rhythm's Comment
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I saw much more rats at night.

6 string rhythm's Comment
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And everybody naturally wants to sleep at night - some just manage better.

Snappy's Comment
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And everybody naturally wants to sleep at night - some just manage better.

Spoken like a true early bird ;)

ButtonUp's Comment
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When I drove night, it didn't matter how much sleep I had, I would start to get tired about 3-4 in the morning (depending on time zone). I learned pretty early that I couldn't fight it, and a 15-20 minute nap was the only thing that would fix it. I might still feel tired, but wouldn't have to fight to keep my eyes open. The benefit was that when my shift was over, other drivers were leaving out for the day and it was easy to find parking.

Now I get up at 0400, get to see the sunrise while driving after a few hours, (behind me, usually), and generally am done before the sun goes down, although depending on the day and the time of year, a lot of times I see both the sunrise and sunset. Usually during the winter.

Anyway, now I don't deal with getting tired at 0400, but sometimes in the afternoon, depending on my lunch (lol), I will get a little tired, but it's not the same as driving at night. Only once or twice have I stopped for a nap during the day. And, if I remember right, it was because I didn't get enough sleep the night before.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

6 string rhythm's Comment
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double-quotes-start.png

And everybody naturally wants to sleep at night - some just manage better.

double-quotes-end.png

Spoken like a true early bird ;)

;)

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