Just Wondering. Am I The Youngest One Here?

Topic 604 | Page 2

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Greg's Comment
member avatar

I'm 22, drove regional Otr for 9 months, now I'm working for a union LTL company as a City Driver, home every single night and Mon through Fri work week.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Ernie S. (AKA Old Salty D's Comment
member avatar

Started driving Oct 2011 at 56.

Lovin the OTR thing.

One day I "MIGHT" think about getting something regional or local, but for now OTR is the only way to go for me.

Ernie

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Panda Man's Comment
member avatar

Im 25, I just started driving for swift a month ago. I think most companies like you to be 23 "for insurance reasons" to drive a semi. not sure though so don't be surprised if im wrong. Im sure someone else on here would be able to correct me if im wrong.

Snowman's Comment
member avatar

I'm only 50, have 3 grandchildren, and started driving last spring!

Snowman's Comment
member avatar

I'm 22, drove regional Otr for 9 months, now I'm working for a union LTL company as a City Driver, home every single night and Mon through Fri work week.

Greg. I need to hook up with that exact thing! I might have a shot driving a "B" truck hauling propane cylinders around. I am ready to do whatever it takes to get off OTR. I live near savannah, GA

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Roadkill (aka:Guy DeCou)'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I'm 22, drove regional Otr for 9 months, now I'm working for a union LTL company as a City Driver, home every single night and Mon through Fri work week.

double-quotes-end.png

Greg. I need to hook up with that exact thing! I might have a shot driving a "B" truck hauling propane cylinders around. I am ready to do whatever it takes to get off OTR. I live near savannah, GA

Hey Snowman..how you like USX?? Lot's of back and forth on them all over the place..some people say good, other say bad..how does a current driver like yourself feel about them?

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

RedGator's Comment
member avatar

Im 29. Started driving OTR I. Nov. 23rd my bday:) Been at it going on 7 months now. Wow I cant believe its been that long already. @brett that hairshocked.png

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Ian R.'s Comment
member avatar

I'm not a truck driver, but looking to get started... I'm only 20.

Scott G.'s Comment
member avatar

Im 26 not a trucker yet but hopefully by July or August I will be.

I'm 37 and starting my training next month on the 11 in Mo. They say you are never to young to start a new job

Snowman's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

I'm 22, drove regional Otr for 9 months, now I'm working for a union LTL company as a City Driver, home every single night and Mon through Fri work week.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Greg. I need to hook up with that exact thing! I might have a shot driving a "B" truck hauling propane cylinders around. I am ready to do whatever it takes to get off OTR. I live near savannah, GA

double-quotes-end.png

Hey Snowman..how you like USX?? Lot's of back and forth on them all over the place..some people say good, other say bad..how does a current driver like yourself feel about them?

Roadkill: USX as a whole has been pretty decent. They have however disappointed with quite a few short runs, and long delays between loads. Their hometime policy is the usual, 1 day per week out. They generally get you home when promised.

However, the recruiter originally promised me a position close to home, and home nights and weekends. That never happened! I am still bitter about being thrown on the road doing OTR for the past year.

Therefore I've personally decided to pursue other interests as you can see above.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

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