Health And Trucking

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Francisco P.'s Comment
member avatar

Hello Let me start off by introducing myself. My name is Francisco and I have oretty much decided that with no interest in any other career other than trucking that I will be pursuing. My main concern about trucking is the health aspect. Not all drivers fit the "fat, unhealthy, etc" view that most people who do not have any insight or any idea of the trucking industry seem to have. Having been obese all my life, and been on a weight loss journey for a bit now I have gone from obese to just a little overweight. I have a tendency to gain weight quickly if not paying attention. For the past tear I have had two goals. Get healthy and get a career on the road. So, to the pros, whether fit, on a weight loss journey, having lost weight as a trucker, or who have been in the same situation I have been, what can I expect? When that day comes and I recieve my own truck, I plan on cooking my meals, or when eating out, do so healthfully. With adjustable dumbbells or resistance band, a little exercise can be done virtually anywhere even if it is only 30 min, 10 min, obviously anything helps. My main concern is driving with a trainer. This can last anywhere between a month to 3 months, in which anything could happen. I would have to abide by my trainers rules, and go by his/her habits. So when the point comes, what are tips, advice, anything helpful you guys can throw at me? I like to plan ahead and be prepared as you can see. Much appreciated and sorry for the long post, lol.

One love, Francisco "FR4NN3H"

David's Comment
member avatar
Great Answer!

Hello Let me start off by introducing myself. My name is Francisco and I have oretty much decided that with no interest in any other career other than trucking that I will be pursuing. My main concern about trucking is the health aspect. Not all drivers fit the "fat, unhealthy, etc" view that most people who do not have any insight or any idea of the trucking industry seem to have. Having been obese all my life, and been on a weight loss journey for a bit now I have gone from obese to just a little overweight. I have a tendency to gain weight quickly if not paying attention. For the past tear I have had two goals. Get healthy and get a career on the road. So, to the pros, whether fit, on a weight loss journey, having lost weight as a trucker, or who have been in the same situation I have been, what can I expect? When that day comes and I recieve my own truck, I plan on cooking my meals, or when eating out, do so healthfully. With adjustable dumbbells or resistance band, a little exercise can be done virtually anywhere even if it is only 30 min, 10 min, obviously anything helps. My main concern is driving with a trainer. This can last anywhere between a month to 3 months, in which anything could happen. I would have to abide by my trainers rules, and go by his/her habits. So when the point comes, what are tips, advice, anything helpful you guys can throw at me? I like to plan ahead and be prepared as you can see. Much appreciated and sorry for the long post, lol.

One love, Francisco "FR4NN3H"

Hey Francisco welcome to the site.

I can tell you from experience, keeping healthy is rough and hard at times. The biggest thing is keeping food on the truck and keeping it cool. There are ways to do this. And avoid truck stop foods.

First is a cooler with ice. Does help keep drinks cold and can keep you from losing some food so long as you keep ice in it. but your spending 2-3$ on ice every day/other day..

second is an Ice less cooler, these plug in via 12v cig outlet, and can keep temps 40 below the ambient temp in cab. Helpful so long as it doesnt reach the 90+ mark.

third option is a mini fridge,which takes up a bit of floor space, unless you have a top bunk and can strap it down. Also need a power inverter to handle the power side of it. Or get a truck fridge that goes into a 12v plug.... There are sites that sell truck fridges, though they cost 300+ but can be worth it and will pay for its self.

Keeping healthy snacks (apples, berries, nuts, bars, etc) and nibbling on them while driving will help keep hunger aside. Avoid fatty greasy foods. Subway is an alternative to fast food. You can get a pretty good lunch for 6 bucks. Keep in mind though your on the truck for 2+ weeks. 14 days times 6 bucks = $84 ( $42 a week) in just subs for lunch. Having cooler/fridge you could spend 20 @ walmart and get sandwich fixings for 5-7 days days. (notice the difference in price..$20 bill is a $20 bill...)

Next thing is parking farther away at truck stops and walking in to the stores. Helps with circulation from sitting all day and is healthy. You can also get weight bands and do workouts in the truck with them. They work good as an alternative to weight bars. Jogging when you stop for your breaks helps. 20min out of the truck can do wonders for your health.

Starting out as a rookie, you'll go for the cheap fast food. but If you aim for a truck stop that has at least a subway and avoid the McD, BK, Chesters etc youll be find. Also avoid soda, worst thing for you. Get yourself bottles of water, or make fresh tea. Truck stops sell an appliance to heat up water to brew tea, or you can get the cold tea bags.

Im getting ready to purchase a new set of bands with different strengths, along with a 10/15Lb dumbbell (easier to do pushups as I have issues bending my wrist)..

There are workout routines out there for truckers, but you'll find it hard to workout after driving for 10+hrs. i myself find it easier to do in the morning. Wake up an hr early, take a 20min jog, sit-ups/push ups quick shower and I feel energized and ready for work.

Otheres will chime in but this should be a good start.

-David

DWI:

Driving While Intoxicated

James925's Comment
member avatar
Great Answer!

One of the things that helped me stay healthy (er) on the road was that I ate one large meal a day, and that was it. I purchased a 12 volt cooler from Costco, and bought all kinds of food for it, either when I was at a truck stop or happened across a store where I could park the truck and run in to do some shopping. During the day I would eat breakfast for my 15-20 minute break, then snack on walnuts, peanuts and fruit snacks during the day. Sometimes I would eat lunch, most of the time the snacks would get me through until I stopped, and by then, my stomach was definitely talking to me.

I didn't work out, but I did walk the truck stops (when it was light enough, won't catch me wandering around at night) if I wasn't tired enough after driving 500-600 miles and dealing with adverse weather conditions. If I was feeling real energetic, I would wake up a little earlier in the morning and take a brisk walk before getting ready. Didn't happen much, but every now and then it did. You may want to get a coffee maker if you happen to want something hot to drink, it can double as water for your tea. If you can get a microwave in your truck, that will help too. If you don't have a microwave, you can get one of those mini crock pots to plug in and warm up your food.

Luckily my trainer was cool, and actually my healthy eating rubbed off on him. One thing I always have daily is a plate of fruit. Simple, just apples oranges and bananas, but it worked. Keep plenty of water on the truck and drink that when you're driving. Hang in there with your trainer, once you get off his truck, you can eat as healthy as you want. Stay safe out there.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
David's Comment
member avatar
Great Answer!
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Thank you David! Is there any way that I could use those items without an inverter? The trucking school that I plan on going with does not allow inverters to be installed (bummer!) and me and my Husband really need to find ways to cook because we are not going to be eating at the fast food places. Thank you again for the info!

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The road master brand has many 12v options like a crock pot, skillet, hot pot, etc. you can check out products on Amazon or Google the 12 volt store to avoid seeing non 12 volt products. I hope that helps. :)

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Thank you Larry! I have looked at some of those 12volt items but not on Amazon...I was trying to see if there was another option to be able to use my nutribullet and nuwave besides having a inverter..

Unfortunately without an inverter with at least 900W you cant run the nutri-bullet, NOW there is another option, may sound foolish but you can always pack what you wanna juice and when you goto shower, just plug it in there, most showers have a power outlet...thats bought the only option.

The RoadPro products will atleast let you cook and have hot water.

What company are you going with?

Diet wise, we all know its doable. But how often do you guys find that you have free non driving time a day that you can actually put towards a little exercise?

Francisco, after driving for 10hrs I find it tough to do any work out, All i want is food and sleep. There are some that find the time and make the time. I try to do something in the morning but as of the past month, Ive been so run down, its hard.

On The Road Fitness Ive posted this article before, its a good read. He's a prime driver, i believe its one reason why they started a fitness program.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Sun King's Comment
member avatar
Great Answer!

The one thing I have noticed from reading everyone's experience is that sometimes there is just no time to get quality food. This may be a little too "hippy" for some, but Sprouting seems like it would be a good option.

Sprouting is super easy. For on the road, the best option seems to be using a Nut Milk Bag

Here's the basic process:

What you need: A jar or container with a lid that is leak proof. I would lean towards plastic if you have it. Milk nut bag Gallon sized Ziplock bag Seeds to sprout

1. Get a leak proof container. soak no more than a few seeds that partially cover the bottom of the container for 2 hours - overnight (depending on the seed)

2. Pour your seeds into the Nut milk bag, draining the water. Rinse. Once rinsed, put the bag in a gallon ziplock. Do not close the ziplock bag. You want it open.

3. Rinse 1-3 times a day for 1-3 days depending on the seed.

4. Eat your sprouts. Depending on the seed you can put them on sandwiches, hot cereal, dishes, or eat plain.

My only concern would be extreme temperatures. If it got too cold or hot it could kill the germination process. For me, I would stick to quick germinating seeds in those situations.

Quick germinating seeds:

Quinoa Buckwheat Almonds Wheat Spelt

Seeds that benefit from 2-3 days: Alfalfa Mung beans Lentils

I have not messed around with Chia seeds, but they seem like an option as well.

Some of these seeds can be easily obtained at a grocery store. Mung beans you can get at Asian grocery stores. Wheat and spelt may be bulk quantities. Alfalfa may be hard to get outside of specialty sprouting packaging.

Here are the easiest to obtain: Lentils - just buy the package off of the grocery store shelf Quinoa - A box or bag of Quinoa can be found in the health food section of any grocery store. Almonds - Just buy raw almonds and you are good to go. These just soak for 24 hours. They don't sprout. Then eat the next day.

Some may be more appealing than others. Personally I am not a fan of soaked almonds, but they could do in a pinch.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

DWI:

Driving While Intoxicated

Jolie R.'s Comment
member avatar

Hi Francisco and welcome to Trucking Truth. I am currently with my trainer and it is very difficult for me to eat healthy. Some will depend on the trainer you are with. Mine does not keep a cooler and we are cramped for space so keeping one of my own would be difficult. That being said, I was hired by Roehl Transport and our time out with a trainer is about 2 weeks so I can deal with it as I only have a few note days before I test to go solo. I too have lost a significant amount of weight and don't want to put any back on because I would like to lose more. It can be done with planning, but won't be easy during your training time. Hopefully others will jump in here and have good tips they have used. Good luck!

David's Comment
member avatar
Great Answer!

Hello Let me start off by introducing myself. My name is Francisco and I have oretty much decided that with no interest in any other career other than trucking that I will be pursuing. My main concern about trucking is the health aspect. Not all drivers fit the "fat, unhealthy, etc" view that most people who do not have any insight or any idea of the trucking industry seem to have. Having been obese all my life, and been on a weight loss journey for a bit now I have gone from obese to just a little overweight. I have a tendency to gain weight quickly if not paying attention. For the past tear I have had two goals. Get healthy and get a career on the road. So, to the pros, whether fit, on a weight loss journey, having lost weight as a trucker, or who have been in the same situation I have been, what can I expect? When that day comes and I recieve my own truck, I plan on cooking my meals, or when eating out, do so healthfully. With adjustable dumbbells or resistance band, a little exercise can be done virtually anywhere even if it is only 30 min, 10 min, obviously anything helps. My main concern is driving with a trainer. This can last anywhere between a month to 3 months, in which anything could happen. I would have to abide by my trainers rules, and go by his/her habits. So when the point comes, what are tips, advice, anything helpful you guys can throw at me? I like to plan ahead and be prepared as you can see. Much appreciated and sorry for the long post, lol.

One love, Francisco "FR4NN3H"

Hey Francisco welcome to the site.

I can tell you from experience, keeping healthy is rough and hard at times. The biggest thing is keeping food on the truck and keeping it cool. There are ways to do this. And avoid truck stop foods.

First is a cooler with ice. Does help keep drinks cold and can keep you from losing some food so long as you keep ice in it. but your spending 2-3$ on ice every day/other day..

second is an Ice less cooler, these plug in via 12v cig outlet, and can keep temps 40 below the ambient temp in cab. Helpful so long as it doesnt reach the 90+ mark.

third option is a mini fridge,which takes up a bit of floor space, unless you have a top bunk and can strap it down. Also need a power inverter to handle the power side of it. Or get a truck fridge that goes into a 12v plug.... There are sites that sell truck fridges, though they cost 300+ but can be worth it and will pay for its self.

Keeping healthy snacks (apples, berries, nuts, bars, etc) and nibbling on them while driving will help keep hunger aside. Avoid fatty greasy foods. Subway is an alternative to fast food. You can get a pretty good lunch for 6 bucks. Keep in mind though your on the truck for 2+ weeks. 14 days times 6 bucks = $84 ( $42 a week) in just subs for lunch. Having cooler/fridge you could spend 20 @ walmart and get sandwich fixings for 5-7 days days. (notice the difference in price..$20 bill is a $20 bill...)

Next thing is parking farther away at truck stops and walking in to the stores. Helps with circulation from sitting all day and is healthy. You can also get weight bands and do workouts in the truck with them. They work good as an alternative to weight bars. Jogging when you stop for your breaks helps. 20min out of the truck can do wonders for your health.

Starting out as a rookie, you'll go for the cheap fast food. but If you aim for a truck stop that has at least a subway and avoid the McD, BK, Chesters etc youll be find. Also avoid soda, worst thing for you. Get yourself bottles of water, or make fresh tea. Truck stops sell an appliance to heat up water to brew tea, or you can get the cold tea bags.

Im getting ready to purchase a new set of bands with different strengths, along with a 10/15Lb dumbbell (easier to do pushups as I have issues bending my wrist)..

There are workout routines out there for truckers, but you'll find it hard to workout after driving for 10+hrs. i myself find it easier to do in the morning. Wake up an hr early, take a 20min jog, sit-ups/push ups quick shower and I feel energized and ready for work.

Otheres will chime in but this should be a good start.

-David

DWI:

Driving While Intoxicated

David's Comment
member avatar

Hi Francisco and welcome to Trucking Truth. I am currently with my trainer and it is very difficult for me to eat healthy. Some will depend on the trainer you are with. Mine does not keep a cooler and we are cramped for space so keeping one of my own would be difficult. That being said, I was hired by Roehl Transport and our time out with a trainer is about 2 weeks so I can deal with it as I only have a few note days before I test to go solo. I too have lost a significant amount of weight and don't want to put any back on because I would like to lose more. It can be done with planning, but won't be easy during your training time. Hopefully others will jump in here and have good tips they have used. Good luck!

Training is the hardest to keep healthy, but If your trainer goes to walmart or will allow you to stop to get some snacks, you can manage. Once you get solo you can stock the truck up good.

Jolie R.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Hi Francisco and welcome to Trucking Truth. I am currently with my trainer and it is very difficult for me to eat healthy. Some will depend on the trainer you are with. Mine does not keep a cooler and we are cramped for space so keeping one of my own would be difficult. That being said, I was hired by Roehl Transport and our time out with a trainer is about 2 weeks so I can deal with it as I only have a few note days before I test to go solo. I too have lost a significant amount of weight and don't want to put any back on because I would like to lose more. It can be done with planning, but won't be easy during your training time. Hopefully others will jump in here and have good tips they have used. Good luck!

double-quotes-end.png

Training is the hardest to keep healthy, but If your trainer goes to walmart or will allow you to stop to get some snacks, you can manage. Once you get solo you can stock the truck up good.

My trainer would not even see about parking overnight at a Walmart when both of us were put of hours due to waiting 9 hours to be unloaded at a consignee. She has her own personal bias against them, so needless to say we don't stop there for food! However, the end is in sight and I can get back to my normal eating soon! smile.gif

Consignee:

The customer the freight is being delivered to. Also referred to as "the receiver". The shipper is the customer that is shipping the goods, the consignee is the customer receiving the goods.

David's Comment
member avatar

My trainer would not even see about parking overnight at a Walmart when both of us were put of hours due to waiting 9 hours to be unloaded at a consignee. She has her own personal bias against them, so needless to say we don't stop there for food! However, the end is in sight and I can get back to my normal eating soon! smile.gif

i don't care for Walmart myself, but it is the easiest place to get a truck into. Can always park in back if I can't naviage through the lot. If I can bobtail , I'd goto a Hyvee (out in the mid west) or Safeway on the west coast. I don't go east so i dunno whats out there.

Consignee:

The customer the freight is being delivered to. Also referred to as "the receiver". The shipper is the customer that is shipping the goods, the consignee is the customer receiving the goods.

Bobtail:

"Bobtailing" means you are driving a tractor without a trailer attached.

James925's Comment
member avatar
Great Answer!

One of the things that helped me stay healthy (er) on the road was that I ate one large meal a day, and that was it. I purchased a 12 volt cooler from Costco, and bought all kinds of food for it, either when I was at a truck stop or happened across a store where I could park the truck and run in to do some shopping. During the day I would eat breakfast for my 15-20 minute break, then snack on walnuts, peanuts and fruit snacks during the day. Sometimes I would eat lunch, most of the time the snacks would get me through until I stopped, and by then, my stomach was definitely talking to me.

I didn't work out, but I did walk the truck stops (when it was light enough, won't catch me wandering around at night) if I wasn't tired enough after driving 500-600 miles and dealing with adverse weather conditions. If I was feeling real energetic, I would wake up a little earlier in the morning and take a brisk walk before getting ready. Didn't happen much, but every now and then it did. You may want to get a coffee maker if you happen to want something hot to drink, it can double as water for your tea. If you can get a microwave in your truck, that will help too. If you don't have a microwave, you can get one of those mini crock pots to plug in and warm up your food.

Luckily my trainer was cool, and actually my healthy eating rubbed off on him. One thing I always have daily is a plate of fruit. Simple, just apples oranges and bananas, but it worked. Keep plenty of water on the truck and drink that when you're driving. Hang in there with your trainer, once you get off his truck, you can eat as healthy as you want. Stay safe out there.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
David's Comment
member avatar

One of the things that helped me stay healthy (er) on the road was that I ate one large meal a day, and that was it. I purchased a 12 volt cooler from Costco, and bought all kinds of food for it, either when I was at a truck stop or happened across a store where I could park the truck and run in to do some shopping. During the day I would eat breakfast for my 15-20 minute break, then snack on walnuts, peanuts and fruit snacks during the day. Sometimes I would eat lunch, most of the time the snacks would get me through until I stopped, and by then, my stomach was definitely talking to me.

I didn't work out, but I did walk the truck stops (when it was light enough, won't catch me wandering around at night) if I wasn't tired enough after driving 500-600 miles and dealing with adverse weather conditions. If I was feeling real energetic, I would wake up a little earlier in the morning and take a brisk walk before getting ready. Didn't happen much, but every now and then it did. You may want to get a coffee maker if you happen to want something hot to drink, it can double as water for your tea. If you can get a microwave in your truck, that will help too. If you don't have a microwave, you can get one of those mini crock pots to plug in and warm up your food.

Luckily my trainer was cool, and actually my healthy eating rubbed off on him. One thing I always have daily is a plate of fruit. Simple, just apples oranges and bananas, but it worked. Keep plenty of water on the truck and drink that when you're driving. Hang in there with your trainer, once you get off his truck, you can eat as healthy as you want. Stay safe out there.

I know being on the road, eating meals is hard, but should always make sure to get 3 healthy meals and snack in between.. just one big meal throws your metabolism off and doesn't help you.

If you find it hard to eat first thing in the morning, a cold glass/bottle of water will kick your metabolism up and help you..

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Bradley D.'s Comment
member avatar

First Post :).

Anyway, would something like "http://powderchow.com/" be good for truck drivers? It's pretty much 100% of all the nutrients and everything you would be getting in a balanced diet without all the bad stuff and tastes pretty good. All you need to make it is a blender and preferably something to make it cold and it's also fairly cheap.

Btw sorry if we're not allowed to post links.

Brian M.'s Comment
member avatar

Something I thought of is bringing my nutri-bullet along with me. I get some low fat yogurt, fresh fruit, some leafy green vegetables and ice and make smoothies in the morning. Its very filling, tastes great and keeps me going pretty much all day. I also seem to be more energetic when I do this. And best of all it takes up very little room.

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