Learning To Let Go And Let Be

Topic 6880 | Page 1

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Bill R.'s Comment
member avatar

I found this in a post by TruckerMike. I am reposting this because I think it is one of THE most valuable pieces of information I have found on any forum of trucking (and I have checked ALOT of them). If we all read this every single day, had it posted in our truck somewhere, and read it every day, then, when we have something bad happen, read it again, IF WE all did that, it would make this profession so much better for everyone everywhere.

Enjoy!

Learning To Let Go And Let Be

Which brings me to my last point. To make it in truck driving, you have let things go. You have to be aloof. You can't let things get to you. Just take things as they come. This is just part of the lifestyle, and it actually feels great to simply not care sometimes. Somebody cuts me off? Whatever. Customer makes me wait 13 hours to get loaded? Great, I'll get some sleep and write a blog! Truck breaks down? Excellent, I'll order myself a pizza at the hotel room my company is paying for! Lock yourself out of your truck on your first solo run? Ok, well, that sucked. But I got through it, didn't I? The point is, there are two kinds of truck drivers out here. The kind that say "that isn't fair" over and over and over again, and the kind that make the best of situations and let things go. I've learned that this industry isn't fair. Not even close. The driver always gets the short end of the stick. That's just the way it is. Either whine about it, or deal with it. I choose to deal with it.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Absolutely! The old cliche 'attitude is everything' applies to trucking in a very big way. If you watch the various drivers around a truck stop you'll find that many of the experienced drivers are either as easygoing as a monk or completely worn down and stressed out. It's because things will happen all day, every day that will make you miserable if you let em. But you'll also have 100 blessings to count every step of the way.

So it really comes down to a choice you make....are you going to let things upset you all the time or are you going to learn to enjoy yourself out there and let the little things go?

I've always preached "attitude is everything" in trucking and I'm well aware of the fact that for newbies who haven't gotten started in trucking it sounds like I'm just regurgitating that same old garbage your teachers used to say. But for drivers like Bill who are out there experiencing it for themselves you quickly realize you'll either go insane or have a nervous breakdown if you don't manage your thoughts and emotions out there.

6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

Brett, another thing you've mentioned before that I've taken to heart is to not have any expectations. As a linehaul driver, this still applies to me, because my scheduled run always has the option of additional dispatches after my first stop. If I just run my regular schedule, it's 360 miles for the day and I'm home before my 30 minute break - nice and easy. If I go into a shift thinking I might get home early, I could be sorely disappointed when I get dispatched to another terminal that might give me 540 miles for the day, a much longer day.

Now, I'm not complaining about the extra miles because that means extra money, but there are some nights when I might not 'feel' like doing a 540 mile run, and if I have it in my mind that I'm getting a short night, then it's a bummer. Fact of the matter is that I'm out to run, and it's my job to move the freight. So, each night I go into work, I make sure to have the attitude of getting the job done, and calling it a day when my dispatcher says it's time to call it a day.

Attitude and perspective go a long way.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Sean's Comment
member avatar

Bill, thanks for bumping/reminding me of TruckerMike's article. I've read it before but today has been one of those days where nothing is going my way and reading it again just now set me straight.

Here's a link to the full article if anyone is interested.

My First Year as a Truck Driver

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
David's Comment
member avatar

Learning To Let Go And Let Be

Which brings me to my last point. To make it in truck driving, you have let things go. You have to be aloof. You can't let things get to you. Just take things as they come. This is just part of the lifestyle, and it actually feels great to simply not care sometimes. Somebody cuts me off? Whatever. Customer makes me wait 13 hours to get loaded? Great, I'll get some sleep and write a blog! Truck breaks down? Excellent, I'll order myself a pizza at the hotel room my company is paying for! Lock yourself out of your truck on your first solo run? Ok, well, that sucked. But I got through it, didn't I? The point is, there are two kinds of truck drivers out here. The kind that say "that isn't fair" over and over and over again, and the kind that make the best of situations and let things go. I've learned that this industry isn't fair. Not even close. The driver always gets the short end of the stick. That's just the way it is. Either whine about it, or deal with it. I choose to deal with it.

This is how I handled last week when I got stuck in Rawlins, WY due to bad weather. I made the best of it. I could have shut myself in the truck for the 70hrs I was down for, or I could get out, sit in the restaurant and have a few good laughs with the other drivers in the same situation and make the time more enjoyable, which is exactly what I did. The time went by quicker sitting and talking.

I too chose to deal with it.

I've locked myself out plenty of times, enough times that now I have a spare key hidden in my engine compartment (Zip tied). no more lock outs. I've only had to use it once. I've had too many people cut me off, flip me the bird. Whatever, Im doing my job and Im doing it safely and at the end of the day, I can say at least no one got hurt. =)

David

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

David's Comment
member avatar

By the way, Brett, have you heard from Mike? I haven't seen/heard him around here since you redesigned the forums....

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

By the way, Brett, have you heard from Mike? I haven't seen/heard him around here since you redesigned the forums....

No he went off and started his own projects and I haven't heard from him since. I'm starting to think him and Guyjax disappeared down the same big hole somewhere.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

David's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

By the way, Brett, have you heard from Mike? I haven't seen/heard him around here since you redesigned the forums....

double-quotes-end.png

No he went off and started his own projects and I haven't heard from him since. I'm starting to think him and Guyjax disappeared down the same big hole somewhere.

Well thats a shame. Maybe they'll both come back some day. =D

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

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