Napier Truck Driving Training....Hamilton, OH

Topic 701 | Page 2

Page 2 of 5 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:
BuckeyeCowboy's Comment
member avatar

Brett, I agree. I think it is a great thing that companies are doing that. I think some familarity while trying to learn something new and all that stress is nice. However, I get the companies not wanting to do it for saftey reasons as well. I mean you are learning a lot and is just so much knowledge to gain. It is like someone told me, "If you ain't learning something new in a truck everyday, you shouldn't be in a truck."

Anyways, I am to nine prehires , and I have 15 companies on my list that I am comparing and researching. Some are better than others, some have a bad repuation. I also think it is important to look at vans, refers and flatbeds so you just don't limit yourself to one area. If you do that you might miss out on a wonderful opportunity with a smaller company. For instance I found one company that I overlooked for a bit until I did some checking and they pay .38 a mile to start, they are flatbeds, and the coolest part is their orientation is 20 mins from my house, so the recuriter said it should be no big deal if I just drive everyday. Now, I have to wait 30 days to take my wife, but this company's schooling is here next to my house, and while in training they have promised me I would be home every other weekend. I would go home one weekend and trainer would be in hotel, then next week I would be in hotel and he would be home. A very fair trade off. Also, they have a chaplain on call or standby in case you need it. Being a christian, I believe that is a wonderful idea, and wish other companies would think of doing that too. Especially in an industry where you are so stressed constantly. Well, enough rambling for the night. God bless.

Prehire:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

Prehires:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

I would say just be very careful about the criteria you're using to evaluate companies. I'll give you some examples:

I have 15 companies on my list that I am comparing and researching. Some are better than others, some have a bad repuation

All companies have bad reputations if you're at TheTruckersReport where it seems everyone that ever flunked out of trucking goes to blame and bash the company that sent them packing. Do not get your opinions on companies from anonymous knuckleheads at TheTruckersReport or RipoffReport or any sites like that. Go to a local truck stop and speak directly with a company's current drivers while they're fueling up or on their way into the truck stop. You want to speak with someone face to face that's out there doing it successfully day in and day out. That's how you get the best information on a company. You'll be amazed at how happy most drivers are, especially if you've been scouring the web for opinions. Remember, people who are happy and productive don't spend much time telling the world about it. They're too busy seeing the country and making money. The complainers that aren't getting the job done (or don't have a job anymore)- they're the ones with sitting home with their big mouths running trying to blame others for their shortcomings.

the coolest part is their orientation is 20 mins from my house, so the recuriter said it should be no big deal if I just drive everyday

You're only in orientation for a few days. You don't want to make a career choice based on that.

and while in training they have promised me I would be home every other weekend

Same thing as the last one - training only lasts a very short time in the grand scheme of things. You want to make good long-term decisions, not just pick a company based on a tiny, short-term convenience.

Also, they have a chaplain on call or standby in case you need it. Being a christian, I believe that is a wonderful idea, and wish other companies would think of doing that too.

As a Christian you already have plenty of people you can call on, and most major truck stops have a chapel service every Sunday. Don't think that the company has a chaplain because they run their company on Christian principles. They have to compete with every other company and they're going to do things the way other companies do them. Whether or not the company has their own chaplain is not going to have any affect on your life out there or your career.

Make sure you read through all of our articles about How To Choose A Truck Driving Job. You'll get a much better understanding of the criteria that's important and where to go to get the information you'll need. Right now you're looking at a lot of things that will have absolutely no impact on you or your career. It's critically important to know which criteria matters and where to go to get the right information.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

BuckeyeCowboy's Comment
member avatar

Brett, I just started reading that series last night. I was half a sleep so I am going to restart them. I get what you are saying, I am just excited. So, update time. I have 16 companies on my list and prehires from six of them so far. Three others will bring me to orientation, they just won't do the prehire letter, unless I really need one. Which, with the ones that I have I am fine. I would list the companies, but not sure what the rules are. My biggest criteria is pay per mile, combine that with what you get for like tarp pay and bonuses and insurance and when it starts, deductibles etc. So, we will keep doing research and see what we can find out. I am almost finished with the research, I am going to start in on state tests for the General Knowledge, Air Brakes, Combination Vehicles, and all the endorsements. I want to go in there knowing it so I can feel confident when it comes time to test. I always get so nervous for tests, but if I go in knowing what I can, and I am sure I know the first few answers, I start to calm down and do well. Thanks for all the advice, I will keep the posts coming.

Combination Vehicle:

A vehicle with two separate parts - the power unit (tractor) and the trailer. Tractor-trailers are considered combination vehicles.

Prehire:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

Prehires:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Yeah, just stick with that High Road Training Program and I absolutely guarantee you you'll fly through all of the CDL written exams, including the endorsements.

And the logbook section is priceless. They really don't teach logbook rules the way they should and a lot of people get out there and don't know how to utilize their time as efficiently as they should.

Everyone gets nervous for tests. And someone just reported a few minutes ago that they got their CDL and thought they were going to have a heart attack and a stroke during the testing! rofl-3.gif

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Logbook:

A written or electronic record of a driver's duty status which must be maintained at all times. The driver records the amount of time spent driving, on-duty not driving, in the sleeper berth, or off duty. The enforcement of the Hours Of Service Rules (HOS) are based upon the entries put in a driver's logbook.

BuckeyeCowboy's Comment
member avatar

Today was a good day. I think I may have found the company that I am leaning going to, if everything stays as planned. I just got to figure out if I want to run refers or dry vans, but everything is looking promising. I have applied to so many companies, some will commit to a pre-hire letter, some will not and I get that. All the recruiters have been really great, but that is their job too. I have learned so much about the industry and how things vary so much from company to company. It is hard to compare them if you just look at pay, benefits, hometime, etc, but still reading your series Brett. I met with the person trying to help get me funding, she is putting the application through and I should know something Monday. I have a job interview on Tuesday. Since I am unemployed and have bills, and don't start training till the 17th of June, I figure I can work full time till school starts, then weekends once in school, and maybe after school that way I can at least make sure my lights stay on. Also, still working on my diet for the physcial. I did want to ask anyone out there, I got my dot physical in April 2013. I was given a one year card. I have to take another one for school, and then another one for the company. I get they are testing for drugs and I have no problem taking a drug test all the time, but why so many physicals? What is the logic behind it? Thanks for your time.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Pre-hire:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

I'm not sure what the law is regarding DOT physicals at the schools, but I know it's Federal law that anytime you change jobs you have to have a new DOT physical.

If you're unemployed, a lot of states will give you a grant through the WIA (Workforce Investment Act. We've had tons of students come through here and get their entire schooling paid for that way. You should look into it if you haven't already.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

BuckeyeCowboy's Comment
member avatar

The WIA program is what I am doing. Lol. Great minds think alike. That worries me about not needing another physical. Still researching and putting in apps. I think I am close to 30. I am preparing info to share with my wife so she can give me her opinion. I know in the end it is my decision but her input is very valuable to me. Thanks for the help.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Hey, when you're applying for work, make sure you call the companies yourself a couple days after putting in the application. Trucking company recruiters are bogged down with work and often times applications will sit on a pile collecting dust. They love to see people take the initiative to call and find out about the status of their app. It will get it pushed to the top of the pile and they'll work on it.

BuckeyeCowboy's Comment
member avatar

Hey Brett,

Great minds think a like again. LOL. I have been doing that already. I am not the kind of person that is good at waiting. LOL. So, I have been calling them and getting all the pre-hires that I can.

On a side note. Great news....the funding for my school went through. I offically start school on June 17th. I am so excited for this opportunity. I am narrowing my choices more and more everyday. Can I mention names here and see what people think? I don't have a truck stop near me to go and ask drivers. I live near a big city.

Also, tomorrow I have a job interview at a local gas station so I can have money coming in while I am in school. I would work full time till then, then go to part time. Hope that all goes well, that or my unemployment goes through. Hope all is well thanks for the wonderful advice, it helps a lot and means a lot. Take care. God bless.

Pre-hire:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

Pre-hires:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Hey that's great news about the funding! Awesome!

You're free to mention companies here and ask opinions. But I don't think it will do you any good. The two best sources of information about a company is their current drivers (unfortunately you don't have a truck stop nearby) and a company's recruiters.

Now you hear a lot of people talk about recruiters not being trustworthy, and that can be true. They are essentially salespeople after all and their job is to bring in as many drivers as possible. But what's really nice about speaking with recruiters from various companies is that they know the very best selling points for their company. They know what advantages their company offers over the others. So yes, they're salespeople so you have to be careful about confirming what they say in writing or with their drivers. But that's the beauty of it.

Your question to each of them will essentially be "Why should I work for your company when I have so many to choose from?" They will most certainly have solid answers for you. That will give you a way to compare the best features from each company you're considering. It will also give you some ideas about features that you hadn't even considered, and that can be a game changer.

So you can ask us what we think about various companies. But it's best to compare the quantifiable measures (mileage pay, average weekly mileage, benefits, home time, equipment, type of freight, etc), speak with some of their current drivers, and speak with their recruiters.

And make sure you read through all of our articles about How To Choose A Truck Driving Job. That's going to give you tons of information also.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Page 2 of 5 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More