CDL Road Test @ Eagan MN

Topic 713 | Page 1

Page 1 of 1
Ken N.'s Comment
member avatar

I was doing so well on road time and range excercises that the director of the school offered me an opportunity to fill a vacant CDL road test time slot a few days ahead of schedule. I passed the pre trip , we went out on the range. I did mostly OK, the lines were worn so I had a wide entry on a left turn... All that was fine until..;. I was traveling west on a range road, came to a stop for a stop sign, scanned the entire area twice and proceeded carefully,, before I reached the center of the intersection, the examiner called a stop ( so I did) and then about a half secon later, from the right side, a car passed in front of me . The road 40 ' to my right is a 4 lane 45 MPH uncontrolled intersection that is the entrance to the test site. The car had been traveleing west as well. He set up for his left turn fast and entered into the short (30') drive that intersects the point where I was stopped and scanning. when I started through there was no way to see this car, he was behind me and 40' to my right on a 45 Mph road. My stop was smooth and almost instant. My examiner was not excited . we proceeded to the backing portion of the test where I performed very well. He then said " unfortunatly I can not take you on the outside road test because I had to call a stop, see you in a week )FAILED ! My problem with the whole thing is " He. as a passenger had plenty of time to see the approaching car on my right, he saw the car shooting into the left turn .Had he not called a stop, the car would have noticed a semi in the intersection 25- 30 feet in front of him and stopped. OR (if texting) would have run into the side of my trailer.

What I learned is always watch the right side in that type of intersection, and it always falls to the professional to avoid an accident. Theese are good lessons, though I cant help the feeling of (one in a million) can I do well after being out of a truck for a week ? I only get 2 hours 2 days before the retest.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Hey Ken. That's a bummer, but in the grand scheme of things it's really pretty trivial. You'll do perfectly fine in the truck after a week with little practice. That's a concern that everyone has but I can't remember anyone ever mentioning it as being a problem when all was said and done.

And one thing to keep in mind is that a CDL examiner who never fails anyone doesn't have a job for long. They have to fail some of the drivers. But getting your CDL doesn't mean you have to prove you're a great driver. Of course you're not - you're brand new. They obviously know this. They also know you're going to have more training once you get on with your first company.

So what CDL examiners are looking for is someone who is obviously picking up on the basics of handling a rig and someone who can stay relaxed and focused behind the wheel, especially under pressure like during the CDL exam. Giving you a CDL basically means they feel you're capable of becoming a safe driver and you're ready to move on to your next phase of training on the road with your first company.

So just relax - you're going to do perfectly fine. Being out of the truck won't be a problem, and failing the test the first time just pretty much makes the second try a formality. When you're taking the test the next time, just focus on being confident and relaxed. Drive it like it's just a friend along for the ride. And believe me, these examiners do not want to fail anyone. They know how important this is for everyone and they want to see you be able to have a career in trucking. But they have a job to do and they have to fail people sometimes. You gave him the opportunity to notch a failure on the board so now they'll feel free to pass you and let you get on with your career as long as you just relax and do what you already know how to do - cruise around town in that rig.

About a week from now you're going to be an officially licensed commercial driver smile.gifgood-luck.gif

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Ken N.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks Brett. Sound advice as always. Just a note of thanks on the HAZMAT prep test. (PASSED) I just got back from taking the written test for my endorsement, finger prints etc.. All ready to go for a relaxed confident and careful CDL-A road test. Thanks again.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Hey, congrats on the Hazmat endorsement!

Definitely looking forward to getting the good news after your next exam smile.gif

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Ken N.'s Comment
member avatar

I posted on the general catagory and thought i'd post here too. Yaaaaay ... CDL Aaaaa. Im on my waaay. was a verrrry gooood daaaaaay. Thanks guys. Passing the road test feels good. Was a lot like navigating hell with a half empty fire extinguisher. ( I only say so cause you dont know truck # 101) Real tough seventh and eight gear. .. also backing tracking etc... but I passed and that is that. Time to learn more. and more . and more. Thanks

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

That's awesome news!!! Congrats!!

Before you know it you'll be on the road with the big dogs!!! smile.gif

Ken N.'s Comment
member avatar

You know Brett, its funny you should say that " Running with the Big Dogs ". I will be out on my own next week. LTL driver, City P&D. They run Mack trucks ! I get to look at a chrome dog butt all day ! I like it. some vry tough docks though, with a 53' in town. Thanks Brett , I will be checking back into " High Road " for weights and balance education.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Page 1 of 1

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

This topic has the following tags:

Becoming A Truck Driver CDL Exam CDL Test Preparation Driver Responsibilities Getting Your CDL Hard Lessons Learned
Click on any of the buttons above to view topics with that tag, or you can view a list of all forum tags here.

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More