Finished With Mentor/trainer John, Day 2 W/ Own Rig.

Topic 7130 | Page 1

Page 1 of 1
Garrick M.'s Comment
member avatar

Hi all, no time to start this my first 240 hrs, too busy learning, trying to fit sleeping and eating around that. John is an awesome trainer, very good at communicating and just letting you make your own mistakes w/o freaking him out. He is an O/O so has his dedicated route , which was good, in that it made things not quite as hairy, but bad in that we basically ran Utah to Nevada and back, one side trip to California. We're both from WI, so we had alot in common. I felt confident to run solo when he dropped me off at Salt Lake City, though I did spend a day cooling my heels while my truck was brought up to specs. Picked up a load here in Utah headed for El Paso,TX. Still don't really understand the sliding pay scale, does the rate go down as you drive more miles, such as when your load destination is 350+ miles is it .25@mile the whole load, or slides down as you pile on the miles? Well, break is over, thanks for letting me share, I'll try and keep up.

Dedicated Route:

A driver or carrier who transports cargo between regular, prescribed routes. Normally it means a driver will be dedicated to working for one particular customer like Walmart or Home Depot and they will only haul freight for that customer. You'll often hear drivers say something like, "I'm on the Walmart dedicated account."

Michael V.'s Comment
member avatar

Who do you drive for? sliding scale is whole miles.

Garrick M.'s Comment
member avatar

Hi! Sorry so long, just no time! I drive for Swift, Dry van , had an awesome dispatcher , kept me busy with some good runs, though the .24-.25@ mi. is hard to swallow, I know it'll increase over time. New problem though. Got a new dispatcher last Tues., one I was working with had family emergency, went on leave. First, I switched from Utah cdl to WI, my home state, faxed copy of temp. license, as all hard copies are mailed out now. Noone let me know they couldn't read the fax, so I was suddenly on safety hold for license, took him 24 hrs. to look into this, give me a different fax#, etc. Since then he has given me short runs with way too much down time in between. I let it go as a newbie, but he has changed my load in mid trip 3x's in 48 hrs. Then I called and told him I would be out of hours after next drop. Instead of giving the ok to go to Swift terminal in Gary,IN after dropE$(could've made it with an hr. to spare.) he sent me to truck stop to fuel, then told me I had to take down time there. Could've made it to terminal w/o truck stop side trip! So I've spent entire weekend in Gary. Left last night to pick up load in OH, 1a.m. rescheduled to SW IL, to a pick up I would be late for even if I drove 80m.p.h. entire way. I told him this and he told me they'd be fine with me arriving late. Well, I'm here, and they aren't fine with it. Is it a huge nono to contact HR dept. and request a different dispatcher? Also, I'm still using a "loaner" rig, supposed to go to home terminal to get assigned truck, sign paperwork to be a Swift employee, that's been going on 3+ weeks, can't really get an answer as to whether I'm technically hired right now. Last 2 weeks I've made less than half what I made as a student driver paid hourly. Don't mean to be so negative, I knew this would be no picnic, but just getting overwhelmed. Someone able to please give me some advice?? Thanks guys, really appreciate it!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Jeffery M.'s Comment
member avatar

I believe your starting pay is.33 for trips over 300 miles. Higher CPM for shorter trips. The mileage rate you listed is old. The full pay scale is listed on the Swift forum on Truckers Report Web site. It shows the old rates and corresponding new pay rate

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Garrick M.'s Comment
member avatar

Hey, thanks for the quick reply re;pay scale, I did look it up and you are correct. Any swift drivers out there w/new hire, dispatch experience that could give me some advice/insight? My load was finally accepted yesterday after a 9 hour delay, still sitting in truck stop just down the road from that drop waiting for another load. Dispatch hasn't answered any of my calls since drop yesterday, never been left hanging this long. Least the weather isn't horrible here! Was nice working out on the west coast for training and first couple weeks. Haven't been to east coast yet, hoping that doesn't happen for awhile, though I hauled show horses all over the U.S. for quite a few years w/@ dually and 6 horse so not really worried about that aspect. Thanks for all the input and adventures to read!

David L.'s Comment
member avatar

Glad you got clarification on the pay scale.

The best was to communicate with your Swift DM is Qualcomm. They will answer the phone but it's usually just as quick (often quicker) to get their attention with a message. I got this from a DM in Ocala - I was sitting with her while my son did a Face-to-Face training session with her. She let us both know she much prefers a message and often she can then research the answer and call you instead of trying to find the answer with you on the phone.

Stay away from the east coast right now. From about DC on up it's potentially nasty.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Garrick M.'s Comment
member avatar

Glad you got clarification on the pay scale.

Thank you for update on contacting DM. I'm learning fast that when I'm an empty truck enroute to pick up a load, or sitting, waiting for one, I can be rerouted to pretty much anywhere. I was cancelled in IL, sent to Syracuse, NY. Had to stop a few hours due to the weather, load was going to Alexandria,LA. Sitting in NY waiting for load, cancelled, picking up an empty trailer, then to pick up load close by in NY(not given name yet.) Then I'm headed for Maine. Really jinxed myself mentioning the east coast, didn't I? I do try to communicate exclusively w/ Qualcomm when I can, know they're busy w/ numerous drivers. Have to be routed home sometime in the next three weeks, temp. license expires then. Home terminal did contact me and tell me I can go back out on West coast after that, or take a dedicated midwest route, though I won't know the specifics til then. Any advice from any of you what would be best for experience/money? Heading out now, thanks all, Brett your blogs have been a lifesaver. Be safe.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Page 1 of 1

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More