Interduction

Topic 7168 | Page 1

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gyppo logger's Comment
member avatar

I thought I would introduce myself, I've been driving for 27 years and am semi-retired now and I have some extra time on my hands. I came across this site and thought it was pretty cool offering all this great information for folks just starting out, I sure would have liked something like this when I first started (I don't think they had the internet back then). I own my truck, '96 Pete, the second one I've owned, my first was a '74 359. I even crashed a company truck so bad, folks couldn't believe I survived when looking at it (need to figure out how to post pictures).

I thought I might be able to help out those who would be interested in the logging industry, I also have a Cozad 4 rail single drop and a 45' possum belly chip van with experience using those during the off season. I hope I'm not being to presumptuous or stuffy, just letting folks know what some my experiences are. I've been a trainer and a pre-hire check out driver mostly for twin sticks which I have in my current truck (bunch of ol' timer loggers still rum em). Anyway, my name's John, aka smitty ch. 4.

Thanks guys, feel free to ask anything. The only stupid question is the one not asked.

Pre-hire:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

Welcome John! I'll be looking for your posts. I always thought what it would be like, trucking in the logging industry. I'm a linehaul driver for an LTL company.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
gyppo logger's Comment
member avatar

That's one job I haven't tried, I see you have a 2 axle, must be running doubles or triples. I don't envey you, that's a young mans job if you don't have experence. Nice to meet ya 6 string.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

That's one job I haven't tried, I see you have a 2 axle, must be running doubles or triples. I don't envey you, that's a young mans job if you don't have experence. Nice to meet ya 6 string.

We have mostly single axles. Yep, I pull doubles. It's actually not that physically demanding at all, unless I'm in a situation where I have to wrestle that dolly. I don't work the dock as a linehaul driver, it's all drop and hook. I'm pretty spoiled.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

D-Wash's Comment
member avatar

Welcome Gyppo! I hear you talking about logging well I grew up logging with my grandfather and its definitely a man's job I can tell ya that my friend. We had 5 Mack trucks a knockleboom loader and 2 skidders and I loved it. So now I'm going to cdl school to drive tankers but again glad to have you aboard and maybe I can check in with you sometimes for some extra knowledge!!!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
gyppo logger's Comment
member avatar

Thanks for the welcome Mr. Wash, I've loaded under those too. The old PTO style loaders with a fixed legth boom, 2 loud honks - move forward, 1 honk - backup. I gotta ton of war stories and they don't cosider you a complete driver untill ya wrecked one, it's pretty tough to crawl back in the cab after that.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
gyppo logger's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

That's one job I haven't tried, I see you have a 2 axle, must be running doubles or triples. I don't envey you, that's a young mans job if you don't have experence. Nice to meet ya 6 string.

double-quotes-end.png

We have mostly single axles. Yep, I pull doubles. It's actually not that physically demanding at all, unless I'm in a situation where I have to wrestle that dolly. I don't work the dock as a linehaul driver, it's all drop and hook. I'm pretty spoiled.

Don't forget to count your steer axle, that counts as 1. My truck is a 3 axle.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

Ralph G. ( Arejay )'s Comment
member avatar

"...We have mostly single axles..."

"Don't forget to count your steer axle, that counts as 1. My truck is a 3 axle."

Good example of a single axle rig... shocked.pngrofl-2.gifa segway towing a trailer

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

D-Wash's Comment
member avatar
Lol....I can imagine Gyppo!!! Stay tuned in ill be reporting every step of cdl school!!!

Thanks for the welcome Mr. Wash, I've loaded under those too. The old PTO style loaders with a fixed legth boom, 2 loud honks - move forward, 1 honk - backup. I gotta ton of war stories and they don't cosider you a complete driver untill ya wrecked one, it's pretty tough to crawl back in the cab after that.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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