Flatbed Delivery

Topic 7817 | Page 1

Page 1 of 1
J.K.'s Comment
member avatar

Hey guys! So I'll start this off with some good news. Today I passed my "written" exams and got my permit! It was a little nerve racking but with the help of the High Road Test prep and other study aids I passed and that's all that matters now.

Now to my question: Where do flatbeds deliver to mostly? Factories? Lumber yards? Warehouses? I've got a general idea but I was just wondering what type of deliveries I should plan on making.

Thanks guys!

Jeffry T.'s Comment
member avatar

Now to my question: Where do flatbeds deliver to mostly? Factories? Lumber yards? Warehouses? I've got a general idea but I was just wondering what type of deliveries I should plan on making.

I am in a regional fleet that only runs the great lakes area and I have made pick ups and deliveries at all of those kinds of places.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Bud A.'s Comment
member avatar

In the few months I've been doing flatbed, I've been to different kinds of factories and warehouses and yards, some in the middle of cities, some in pretty remote places. I've also been to some small plumbing and building materials supply places, a rock quarry, a small town water treatment plant, and a trip down some very narrow side streets to deliver structural steel for a new building at a very nice house. The variety of places is one of the things I like about it.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

J.K., congratulations on that permit!

Where do flatbeds deliver to mostly? Factories? Lumber yards? Warehouses? I've got a general idea but I was just wondering what type of deliveries I should plan on making.

You pretty much answered your own question. You are going to go to all those types of places. One of the benefits of flat-bedding is that you don't have to sit at a large seemingly unorganized distribution center waiting on someone to figure out which of the hundreds of doors you are at. Much of the time you will pull into a parking lot, get your tarps and straps off and there will be a fork-lift operator waiting there to unload you. Like this:

Unloading lumber from a flatbed truck at night

Sometimes you will pull into or back into a large warehouse where they will have large overhead cranes to unload you such as this:

Overhead crane loading aluminum onto a flatbed truck indoors.

You may end up at some construction sites and get unloaded with whatever equipment is available on the job site:

Bobcat unloading a flatbed truck on a gravel lot at a construction site.

There are even going to be times where you will have to make sure you are on time to your delivery location because someone has paid for a large crane to be there to unload you at a certain time, like this:

Huge crane loading pallets onto a flatbed truck in a parking lot

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Pat M.'s Comment
member avatar

Old School hit this one on the head.... BUT he forgot the job sites that do not have the proper equipment to lift what you are delivering. That is always fun. I was delivering some manholes to a job site last week and the supervisor was telling his loader operator (forks on the loader) that he would have to scoop the manholes off the deck of the trailer. What this entails is forcing the forks between the bed of the trailer and the manholes. Mind you, these manholes ranged in weight between 5k and 10k each. I said the He!! you are. He then stated that we should have put dunnage under them and I told him that this is how they are delivered and they were supposed to have the proper equipment to lift them from the lifting points... Well I just happened to have a set of 4 way picking chains in the trailer. You have to watch what the operators are doing or you will end up with damage to your trailer if they follow the advice of their superiors.

You are the captain of your ship and you have to protect it.

Pat M.'s Comment
member avatar

I forgot, sometimes the job site is ... Go to the top of Lolo pass and turn on the gravel road on the right. Then drop the excavator 7 miles down that road. Almost lost the trailer 2 times on that one but at 6 miles there was a large road junction... Dropped the excavator there and they had to road it the last mile.

Page 1 of 1

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

This topic has the following tags:

Flatbed High Road Training Program Life On The Road Photos Truck Equipment Questions
Click on any of the buttons above to view topics with that tag, or you can view a list of all forum tags here.

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More