Question On Central Refrigerated

Topic 8526 | Page 1

Page 1 of 3 Next Page Go To Page:
Hudsonhawk's Comment
member avatar

What is everyone's idea on Central Refrigerated as a starting company? I'm planning on going to train with them in June in Fontana. Will they train me adequately or just rip me off?

I'm a 29 year old Iraq veteran who is tired of sitting in a cubicle. I use to drive tanks and now I drive a desk. Been looking for a change and been lurking on these forums for awhile. I really have to say thank you for the learning resources on here. I've spent a little time through the high road studying guide and will be spending more here soon.

Old School's Comment
member avatar
Will they train me adequately or just rip me off?

Jeremy, when I see someone coming into this business asking a question like that I wonder what is it that makes you feel that way? These companies need and appreciate their drivers who are productive and professional. Okay, I realize the internet is full of B.S sob stories about getting ripped off by "the man" at the big greedy trucking conglomerates, but there is absolutely no validity in them. They are taking on a life of their own that is being propagated by unwary and unknowing individuals who jumped into this career thinking they had it all figured out. only to find they knew nothing, but are too proud and stubborn to admit their defeat.

I'm going to tell you what I know about Central Refrigerated. I know that one of our moderators in this forum trained there (Daniel B.) I also know that they are now part of the Swift family of trucking companies - one of the largest operations in the country. I know that they have recently gone through some changes due to the change in ownership, and that they have had some pay increases for their new drivers. They did not experience their success by "ripping off" their drivers. They are not the highest paying way to get into this field, but that doesn't make them a rip off either. If you are going to feel that you are being ripped off because some other drivers are making more money than you are then I suggest you look into some of the higher paying Company-Sponsored Training programs before you make a final decision. One of them is paying their drivers 700 bucks a week minimum during the training period. Follow that link and see what you come up with.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Hudsonhawk's Comment
member avatar

I'm not after the money honestly just the lifestyle. I'm concerned because in 2006 I got a reckless driving conviction for doing donuts in a parking lot. The recruiter said it's fine although everywhere I look it says not to trust the recruiters.

I'm pretty much settled for central though because I specifically want the reefer experience.

I apolagize if it sounds negative about the rip-off comment I'm just concerned about putting all my balls in one basket kind of thing.

So will the reckless disqualify me? The website here says 3 years wait, it's been about 9 with no traffic violations since.

Again thank you for the advice!

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Nine years ought to be more than sufficient.

There are a lot of Reefer jobs out there. Daniel B. trained at Central because he liked the idea of getting into a truck of his own very quickly. After he did a year over there he switched to pulling a reefer for Prime, and immediately started making something like twice the money. You'll get the lifestyle at either company, but not too many people will complain about twice the pay.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Hudsonhawk's Comment
member avatar

Oh I understand the monetary incentive, I plan on saving most of it. The main reason I want to stick with this is because it's who I told the recruiter I want to work for and I like keeping my word.

I'm planning on learning alot and being diligent in learning. I'm just concerned because of all the horror stories floating around. I'm not like most people in life though I'm a hard worker and know it. The idea of being on the road is very appealing to me. I was never meant to be in a cubicle and it's showing in who I am.

the recruiter said they have a 98 percent graduation rate which doesn't sound right to me. It's a company called TDA in Sacramento, they said one week here in Sacramento then three weeks down south and then plan on being on the road immedietly.

Being a veteran they said it would be paid for once I work for them for a year.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Hudsonhawk's Comment
member avatar

I believe you are all amazing people, don't get me wrong I'm not singing praises or kissing up but I think it's great that thus site is here. It looks like it has taken alot of time and resources that was done out of someone's gracious attitude.

The high road trucking training course is amazing to say the least but the fact that you all spend time fielding questions for people is amazing as well.

Hudsonhawk's Comment
member avatar

So I listened to your advice and have done some research on Prime. They seem like the kind of outfit I want to work for so I'm scheduling to head out for orientation on June 8th.

I'm going to take this time to study for my permit test and to try to get it here in California before I leave. I can't wait, thank you for the advice.

Anyone have any advice for going to the prime headquarters?

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Jeremy, are you using the High Road Training Program for your studying? It will get you where you want to be and help you retain the knowledge needed to ace those permit tests.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Mr. Smith's Comment
member avatar

Jeremy I just finished my training with central refrigerated in Fontana they r Swift they teach you how to pass the California tests then test you, if you pass they send you out with a mentor to really learn how to do it you really going to have to teach yourselfthey teach you the bare minimum really use the high road training programs especially for the logstake the night shift when you do your training for driving and everything will be ok

Hudsonhawk's Comment
member avatar

Yep, I've been going through it. I like how thorough it is. So are most states similar when it comes to these regs?

As far as prime, is it doable? I really want to drive for them now that I've found a few things out. E.g. higher pay, built in apu & inverters.

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

Page 1 of 3 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More