I've Been In Training For 6 Months And I Still Can't Get The Hang Of Shifting

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Robert B.'s Comment
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Ive been training for 6 months and I still can't get the hang of shifting ,I have 50 hours left before i graduate. and the last instructor I have is a real jerk .Im starting to think this is not for me.

Daniel B.'s Comment
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Are you still double clutching?

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Double Clutching:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Robert B.'s Comment
member avatar

Ive been training for 6 months and I still can't get the hang of shifting ,I have 50 hours left before i graduate. and the last instructor I have is a real jerk .Im starting to think this is not for me.

yes i am

Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

That's the problem, double clutching is a real pain and you'll never double clutch again when you go solo. Floating the gears is so much easier.

Just go with the flow for now. It takes a long time to master shifting gears. Don't be so hard on yourself this is a learned skill.

Here's my personal advice. Try upshifting at 1200 RPMs and downshifting at 1000 RPMs. If you downshift with lower RPMs you won't have to rev your engine as hard for it to go in. At a 1000 RPM downshift, you only need to rev it to 1300 RPMs and it'll go right into the gear. So try lowering your shift points.

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Double Clutching:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Max E.'s Comment
member avatar

You can not fail a CDL exam by grinding gears.. I imagine your at a CDL school. Their whole goal is to get you to graduate with a CDL. Once you find a company to hire you that's when the real training will begin. Floating gears is a lot easier then double clutching. Just don't worry about it to much.. also I found what helped me is to watch various Youtube videos on double clutching , also to imagine yourself doing it.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Floating Gears:

An expression used to describe someone who is shifting gears without using the clutch at all. Drivers are taught to "Double Clutch" or press and release the clutch twice for each gear shift. If you're floating gears it means you're simply shifting without using the clutch at all.

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Double Clutching:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

James U.'s Comment
member avatar

Don't think so hard about shifting before you do it. Just rev the engine listen to it look at the rpms take your time don't stomp on the throttle like a car. Build up speed slowly until about 1300 rpms then clutch shift clutch. Its not a race. If you are sitting at a light and the cars next to you take off don't try doing what they are doing just take your time building speed slowly don't worry about the cars behind you if they want to go fast then tuff they can go around you. While your building up speed slowly that will also give that lead time you need to stop because the cars in front of young will take off. When down shifting you don't need to down shift thro every gear skip shift. Like when coming off the highway let the truck slow down even if you use a little break.let that motor bog down to 1000 to 800 rpm and below 35 mph then down shift to 8th then if you need to do that again let it bog down to the same and below 15 mph then down shift into 6th. With down shift its almost the same its clutch shift tap throttle clutch shift into gear. The key to it all is take your time your not drag racing or in a car. Do not stomp on the throttle

Robert B.'s Comment
member avatar

Don't think so hard about shifting before you do it. Just rev the engine listen to it look at the rpms take your time don't stomp on the throttle like a car. Build up speed slowly until about 1300 rpms then clutch shift clutch. Its not a race. If you are sitting at a light and the cars next to you take off don't try doing what they are doing just take your time building speed slowly don't worry about the cars behind you if they want to go fast then tuff they can go around you. While your building up speed slowly that will also give that lead time you need to stop because the cars in front of young will take off. When down shifting you don't need to down shift thro every gear skip shift. Like when coming off the highway let the truck slow down even if you use a little break.let that motor bog down to 1000 to 800 rpm and below 35 mph then down shift to 8th then if you need to do that again let it bog down to the same and below 15 mph then down shift into 6th. With down shift its almost the same its clutch shift tap throttle clutch shift into gear. The key to it all is take your time your not drag racing or in a car. Do not stomp on the throttle

All the advice so far is great ,but dealing with a trainer that is constantly complaining in you ear is a little much. I don't know how to deal with this situation. I have my cdl. I just need 50 over the road hours . Example of one of his comments "if I was your boss,I would of fired you. That's why I'm not sure if this is for me.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Chris the stick slinger's Comment
member avatar

He's not your boss or is he likely to be. Forget him. Relax and do what you know you can do. It'll come.

Don't let one person make you think about quitting.

Bill R.'s Comment
member avatar
double-quotes-start.png

Don't think so hard about shifting before you do it. Just rev the engine listen to it look at the rpms take your time don't stomp on the throttle like a car. Build up speed slowly until about 1300 rpms then clutch shift clutch. Its not a race. If you are sitting at a light and the cars next to you take off don't try doing what they are doing just take your time building speed slowly don't worry about the cars behind you if they want to go fast then tuff they can go around you. While your building up speed slowly that will also give that lead time you need to stop because the cars in front of young will take off. When down shifting you don't need to down shift thro every gear skip shift. Like when coming off the highway let the truck slow down even if you use a little break.let that motor bog down to 1000 to 800 rpm and below 35 mph then down shift to 8th then if you need to do that again let it bog down to the same and below 15 mph then down shift into 6th. With down shift its almost the same its clutch shift tap throttle clutch shift into gear. The key to it all is take your time your not drag racing or in a car. Do not stomp on the throttle

double-quotes-end.png

All the advice so far is great ,but dealing with a trainer that is constantly complaining in you ear is a little much. I don't know how to deal with this situation. I have my cdl. I just need 50 over the road hours . Example of one of his comments "if I was your boss,I would of fired you. That's why I'm not sure if this is for me.

WOW, that is so inappropriate for a trainer to ever say.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

James U.'s Comment
member avatar

Contact the fleet manager that fleet manager is also your fleet manager and tell him/her about this guy and how inappropriate he is. Don't let one person and his rudeness determine your life and what you want to do. Did you try shifting the way I said?

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
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