CRST Expedited Trucking School and training program Cedar Rapids, IA. A (re) training diary by millionmiler24

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millionmiler24's Comment
member avatar

06/20/2017:

Today, I woke up at 0515 and had breakfast. Then I went over to NADTA for another EXHAUSTING day of CDL training. When class started at 0800, We went over the 2nd key of the Smith System and watched some more videos during the morning half. The morning half is mostly going to be more Smith System stuff and more videos until we test on the Smith System. I think after that is when they will have us on the range for the WHOLE DAY. Then after lunch, we went out to practice more skills tests. I got to finally do what I call the BACK OF DEATH.....THE INFAMOUS 90. I was the second one to go in the backing truck today. I got to do an offset followed by a straight line back. Then I went around the range and set up for the FAMOUS 90. The instructor had me pivot (which by NADTA's terminology means turn my wheel to the right) until the passenger side landing gear pad was visible in my mirror and then he had me GOAL. I saw where the DOT bumper was and then I walked the path of the trailer right to the imaginary dock. Then he had me push (NADTA Lingo for turn the wheel to the left) which got a lot of the bend out of the trailer. This back right then turned into a basic 45 offset. Then after that I was watching the location of my trailer tandems and walked the trailer into the "Dock" and straightened out and did one pull up and got centered in the dock place and then straight line backed it into the dock. When I got out of that truck, my instructor asked me how was that? It was a good 10 seconds before I could speak and I told him I couldn't believe I just did my first 90 back.

shocked.png

That maneuver is NOT easy to do. He told me to slow down and analyze what I was doing. I am glad he said that because I am a VERY ANALYTICAL person. I sometimes tend to OVERTHINK things. If ANYONE on here has any tips on that 90, please let me know. Anyway after I caught my breath, I took a little break and a MUCH NEEDED 3 glasses of water, and then got with another instructor and we worked on shifting from 3rd to 5th gear. He told me that I just need to relax and he could clearly tell that I was experienced. He said give it time and it will come back to you. He said he was impressed that I even knew how to float and double clutch. He said just work on my hand-leg-brain timing, in other words work on getting them into sync and I would be just fine when it comes to test time. My reaction time has NEVER been good. I just hope it all works come test time. Anyway I am EXTREMELY EXHAUSTED so I am going to close out this update. Until tomorrow, however at all times, continue to stay safe out there.

smile.gifthank-you.gifthank-you-2.gif

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

millionmiler24's Comment
member avatar

06/21/2017:

Let me start off todays update by saying: Happy first day of summer (officially)! Anyway, I woke up today at 0530, had breakfast and then went to NADTA at around 0700 for class at 0800. We went over the 3rd Key in the Smith System and watched more videos, then we had lunch. After lunch, I got onto the Backing range and did a PERFECT Straight line back and NAILED an offset back for the first time in 2+ yrs. That really made me feel great. I didn't get to do the DREADED 90 today, however I sure hope to get to attempt it again tomorrow. Our instructor there today was super cool. I explained how to do the offset to show and tell him what I learned so far (or in my case, relearned) and he told me get in the truck and nail it and I sure nailed it. It made me feel a lot better about my test next week. If only I could get 90s down that good and get back to double clutching that good and also nail the PTI that easily, I would be golden toward that white hat and my CDL-A License. Anyway, sorry this update is so short however the computer room here is about to close and I need to get off of here. Until tomorrow, stay safe out there at ALL times.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Double Clutching:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

millionmiler24's Comment
member avatar

06/22/2017:

Today I woke up around 0545 and had breakfast, then I boarded the 0700 shuttle to NADTA for class at 0800. Morning half is the same stuff it has been all week. Smith System and more videos. We test on the Smith System tomorrow and we have to pass that to continue on. I got it, no worries. smile.gif Anyway, the 2nd half after lunch, things weren't really that eventful. I wanted to go onto the backing range but they had me go drive around town and some on US 30. I went in the Manual truck and I am getting my groove back a little better with double clutching but I still need work. I asked my instructor had this been my road test, would I have passed and he said probably not. He was telling me that I was impeding traffic when the speed limit was 45 and I was doing 35 (Impeding traffic is an automatic fail on a DOT road exam). wtf.gifwtf-2.gif Well, the reason I slowed down was because it was raining off and on and the water on the road was mixing with any residual oil and vehicle fluids on the roadway surface. When this happens, if you are going too fast for conditions, it can cause your vehicle to hydroplane which can cause a major accident unless controlled properly. I felt I was driving the correct speed for conditions. If there are any experienced drivers with more experience than me on here (MORE than 2.5 yrs OTR WITHIN the last 5 years), please let me know, did I do this right or not? In town (from my understanding anyway) We are supposed to drive 5 under the limit MAXIMUM in GOOD/IDEAL CONDITIONS. If conditions are unfavorable which imo they were with water on the roadway and it raining, then you drop that down by 5. With the conditions as they were (raining/slick roads) driving 10 under the limit, is that REALLY impeding traffic? Anyway, when he told me that, I just said, ok. Thanks for your input, I really appreciate it. Now I know what I need to work on for the next time I go on the road. I was respectful and professional as I am expected to be. However I thought in the back of my mind that if driving 10 under the limit in less than ideal conditions was impeding traffic, then I am Kim Jong-Il. Oh well, live and learn I guess. From here on out on a eval or a practice and ESPECIALLY on my DOT ROAD EXAM, I will drive 5 under the limit as instructed, NO MATTER the CONDITIONS. If I am wrong about any of this, please do correct me here. Anyway, after I got back from the road practice, I thought I would get to go onto the backing range and get some practice there, however, it was 1515 when we got back. We NORMALLY don't get dismissed until 1800 every night, however today all of class 203 that was out on the backing range or on the road practice trucks got sent back to the training center early. The same lead instructor that gave us the backing class that I thought was too technical, he is the one that dismissed us all and said that it was due to "overcrowding". I think he felt he needed the range for the people who keep failing their backing tests to help them practice to get better and in turn, pass. He told us to be back tomorrow morning at 0800. We are only in our first week at NADTA so when we get to where class 202 is then he probably will do the same stuff to Class 204. Anyway, The shuttle was there waiting to bring us back here to the training center. One bright side to this is I am not near as exhausted as I have been this week, however I really and truly feel I could have used more practice today. I test in 5 DAYS. I NEED the practice. The CLOSER those tests come to me, the more NERVOUS I get. I NEED to pass ALL these tests on the FIRST attempt, for me, for yall, for my friend back in Florida, for my friends in Davenport and MOST of ALL for GOD because he led me here to help me get back into this industry. Anyway until tomorrow, stay safe out there at ALL times.

thank-you.gifthank-you-2.gifsmile.gif

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Double Clutching:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
millionmiler24's Comment
member avatar

06/23/2017:

Today I woke up at 06:00 and left for NADTA on the 0700 shuttle for class at 0800. We reviewed the Smith System, watched a video and then TESTED on the Smith System. I was one that PASSED the 1st time! I was relieved. Come to find out, if you FAIL the Smith System test, you will be ineligible for the White hat. They count the Smith System in there also. That summed up the morning. Now on to the afternoon. We had lunch and half the class had to stay after lunch up until 1515 and the other half was off for lunch until 1515. I was in the half that came back at 1515. When we got there, I got on the backing range and I NAILED my 3rd offset in school. That makes 2 offset backs I have nailed without guidance. Now on to what I WAS most NERVOUS about......THE BACK OF DEATH.......THAT INFAMOUS 90. I got to do one again today. The 1st one I tried the other day, I got it in the hole but the instructor was with me every step of the way. Today however......I got to do a 90 again and I will be a monkeys uncle...... shocked.png I NAILED IT WITHOUT GUIDANCE!!!!!!! shocked.png I couldn't believe it. I just slowed down, thought about what those 2 instructors told me and also that TECHNICAL explanation that the lead instructor told us in the backing class. I broke that down and applied it and if you remember to SLOW DOWN AND ANALYZE THE MOVE, you will NAIL it EVERY time, ESPECIALLY IF YOU SETUP CORRECTLY. Its not as bad as I thought initially. Just analyze it and you will NAIL it EVERY TIME. You have to be one with the truck. YOU make the truck work for you, not you work for the truck. You do that and that trailer will go where you want her to go EVERY TIME. I am SO RELIEVED that I did that. I feel a HUGE burden has now been removed from me. NOW to STUDY that PRE TRIP like there's no tomorrow. If I NAIL PreTrip and back like I did today and get the rust off of my double clutching , I shouldn't have a problem getting that White Hat and MOST IMPORTANTLY, that CDL A back in my wallet. THAT RIGHT NOW IS MY ULTIMATE OBJECTIVE. I do feel a LOT better about this now. Thanks so much for all of your support in this Journey. Soon, I will be going BANANAS WHEN I PASS on Wednesday all in one shot. I am SO ready to PASS these tests and move on. Anyway, I am going to close out this update. Yall be safe out there at all times and have a great night. Until Tomorrow.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Double Clutching:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
millionmiler24's Comment
member avatar

06/24/2017:

First of all, let me say, sorry this update is over 12 hrs late. I will explain why later on in this update.

Anyway to start off, I woke up at 0430 considering I had to be at NADTA at 0615 for class. Now that we are done with Smith System, we wont be in the classroom any other than to get our assigned carousels and what ever time we are going to test on test days (s). Due to the shortage of instructors, they may split our testing over 3 days. On the 14th day after you have your permit, (which for me is this Wednesday) we will have PTI, then the next day backing then the next day, road and hopefully that same day you will get to go to the DMV and obtain your CDL.

As soon as 0615 rolled around we (if you are in class 203) got assigned a carousel with 2 instructors. One of the instructors was PTI/road and the other was backing. I started off on the PTI/road truck and then went to backing. The instructor had 2 of us pretrip, one did form A and the other did In cab, and the other 2 drove. I was in that part of the group. I drove first and the other guy drove second. Comes to find out I have more I need to work on for the road exam. I was turning out of the yard and my trailer tandems clipped the curb going out. (I know that would have been an automatic fail had that been my test). I dont know if my nerves of this is getting to me or not, normally I am better than this. What do yall think? Anyway, 2nd of all, I talked to the instructor about the impeding traffic thing from the other day and they said if you go 11 mph under the posted limit or MORE, then NO MATTER THE CONDITIONS, its considered IMPEDING TRAFFIC. I asked her about that and she said SOME of the DOT instructors there will work with you on it if conditions are not ideal, however you have to be proactive and let them know WHY you are slowing down and make them aware that you know you may be impeding traffic. There main job is to see at the end of the day if you can drive the truck SAFELY. Unfortunately there is such a thing as being too safe. (I find that hard to believe). Anyway, she told me I need to work on telling the instructor what to do at a railroad crossing and an emergency stop. We will be asked to simulate them both on the test. What I would like to know is WHY WASNT I TOLD ABOUT THAT SOONER?! Anyway, so now more stuff to study. No worries though. It will be worth it when we have those CDLs in our wallets. She also said I can upshift with double clutching , I just need a lot of work on Downshifting, especially. I have a habit of riding the clutch and the brake in the city when I am coming up to a stoplight. Also, I tend to signal a little early. The speed control thing is also an issue because I tend to play it a little too safe. I like to go 10 under the limit so I am being safe. That truck is a 40 ton (80K lb) missile that can take someone out if not handled safely. I drive the way I do to PREVENT accidents, not to CAUSE them. Is my logic wrong here or not? Please let me know.

Anyway, after I got back, we were on the backing range. I nailed another offset and another 90. Todays 90 wasnt as good as my last one, however I got it in. I had to do 1 GOAL and 2 pullups. Which at the end of the day that would still be NO points, so I was good then. I was a little close on the right side but no encroachments or hit cones so I was good either way. After we got done, I had lunch and then our half of the class that had to be there at 0615 was dismissed after lunch. I got back in the room and literally fell asleep because I was so tired. I did not want to get out of that bed. I didn't get up until 0930 this morning. Thats why this update is so late. sorry.gif I am sorry about that, however I so needed that sleep. One of CRSTs policies says if you are too tired to drive that truck, keep it shut down and you get some rest. Dispatch will work with you on that. I know I am glad for that. Anyway, I will try to get todays update up as soon as I can, however most of it would be about me sleeping and enjoying the day off I have so it probably won't be much of one, so just a heads up there. Anyway, until later or possibly tomorrow, stay safe out there at all times.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Double Clutching:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

millionmiler24's Comment
member avatar

06/25/2017:

Well today has been very uneventful to say the least. I wake up at 0930 this morning (we had the day off from NADTA today) and fix myself some breakfast. Then I come in the computer lab to put up yesterdays update (I was so tired after NADTA yesterday that I just crashed out until this morning) then after that I get onto the shuttle to go to NADTA so I can utilize a truck and trailer to practice my pretrip and incab test on and there are no trucks available. They are all reserved for people in Class 204 that started today and Class 202 for those still trying to pass their tests today. So after 2 hours over at NADTA, I just end up walking back to the training center and went into the room for a little bit, cleaned up my area and now I am back in here updating the forums. I plan on having dinner at 1700 and then hopefully getting a shower and then crashing out considering I have to be up at NADTA at 0615 tomorrow. Until tomorrow night, stay safe out there at all times.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
millionmiler24's Comment
member avatar

5. Pre Trip Inspection guidelines_ YOU WILL NOT NEED TO STUDY THIS TO GET YOUR PERMIT, BUT IT IS SOMETHING YOU WILL HAVE TO MEMORIZE WORD FOR WORD - ITS NEVER TOO EARLY TO BEGIN

Is it possible to email a copy of the pre trip inspection guide. I have studied the manual from cover to cover and the pretrip is the only thing I am worried about. seeing as I have never been inside a truck and I am planning on starting school 09/2017. If it Is not a problem I would like to get a copy of the pre-trip or information on where I can find pre-trip inspection list/guide to study before school comes around I want to memorize it completely before going to cdl school. I loving reading these journal entries it gets me super pumped knowing that Ill be there in the very seat that you're sitting in. I look forward to reading your diary be safe pay attention and make us (your trucking truth family) proud! Godspeed!

Ok, Danielle, I am glad I found this. This is EVERYTHING you will need to practice your Pre Trip. Good Luck. Hope you pass on the FIRST attempt!

Pre-trip Inspection:

A pre-trip inspection is a thorough inspection of the truck completed before driving for the first time each day.

Federal and state laws require that drivers inspect their vehicles. Federal and state inspectors also may inspect your vehicles. If they judge a vehicle to be unsafe, they will put it “out of service” until it is repaired.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Millionmiler24 wrote:

I talked to the instructor about the impeding traffic thing from the other day and they said if you go 11 mph under the posted limit or MORE, then NO MATTER THE CONDITIONS, its considered IMPEDING TRAFFIC. I asked her about that and she said SOME of the DOT instructors there will work with you on it if conditions are not ideal, however you have to be proactive and let them know WHY you are slowing down and make them aware that you know you may be impeding traffic. There main job is to see at the end of the day if you can drive the truck SAFELY. Unfortunately there is such a thing as being too safe. (I find that hard to believe). Anyway, she told me I need to work on telling the instructor what to do at a railroad crossing and an emergency stop. We will be asked to simulate them both on the test. What I would like to know is WHY WASNT I TOLD ABOUT THAT SOONER?!

Here is my suggestion for the impeding traffic ambiguity;

If it's raining or there are pedestrians present, let the instructor WHY you are proceeding with caution and going below the speed limit. Real-world situation? Drive at a speed to safely match the weather, traffic, and road conditions. No officer is going to write you up for going 10 below the speed limit if conditions warrant that speed. For example: if it is snowing and beginning to cover the road, dropping only 5mph below the speed limit may or may not "get it done".

There is no such thing as being unsafe, however driving at 25 in a 35 zone for no apparent reason, can be considered unsafe. Double edge sword, exercise good judgment and common sense.

Here is the overall thought process on describing your driving path and approach to the instructor; your narration shows them you are thinking about what you are doing and why. It also gives them the option of corrective action if your approach is deemed unsafe.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

millionmiler24's Comment
member avatar

Millionmiler24 wrote:

double-quotes-start.png

I talked to the instructor about the impeding traffic thing from the other day and they said if you go 11 mph under the posted limit or MORE, then NO MATTER THE CONDITIONS, its considered IMPEDING TRAFFIC. I asked her about that and she said SOME of the DOT instructors there will work with you on it if conditions are not ideal, however you have to be proactive and let them know WHY you are slowing down and make them aware that you know you may be impeding traffic. There main job is to see at the end of the day if you can drive the truck SAFELY. Unfortunately there is such a thing as being too safe. (I find that hard to believe). Anyway, she told me I need to work on telling the instructor what to do at a railroad crossing and an emergency stop. We will be asked to simulate them both on the test. What I would like to know is WHY WASNT I TOLD ABOUT THAT SOONER?!

double-quotes-end.png

Here is my suggestion for the impeding traffic ambiguity;

If it's raining or there are pedestrians present, let the instructor WHY you are proceeding with caution and going below the speed limit. Real-world situation? Drive at a speed to safely match the weather, traffic, and road conditions. No officer is going to write you up for going 10 below the speed limit if conditions warrant that speed. For example: if it is snowing and beginning to cover the road, dropping only 5mph below the speed limit may or may not "get it done".

There is no such thing as being unsafe, however driving at 25 in a 35 zone for no apparent reason, can be considered unsafe. Double edge sword, exercise good judgment and common sense.

Here is the overall thought process on describing your driving path and approach to the instructor; your narration shows them you are thinking about what you are doing and why. It also gives them the option of corrective action if your approach is deemed unsafe.

So just to clarify, I handled this correctly?

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Millionmiler asked:

So just to clarify, I handled this correctly?

The part about impeding traffic; yes.

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About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

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Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

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