Food Grade Or Chemical Tanker

Topic 20034 | Page 2

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Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

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If you are looking at food grade, take a look at Prime. They have a NE regional for food grade tanker as well. Also Prime is one of the best paying companies that hire inexperienced drivers.

TBH, I have seriously considered switching to food grade tanker from dry van more than once. Prime has been on my short list if I decide to take that leap.

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tsk tsk. I thought you were supposed to be going local.

We could really use another local guy on our side. Me and 6string are way outnumbered.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Patrick C.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

If you are looking at food grade, take a look at Prime. They have a NE regional for food grade tanker as well. Also Prime is one of the best paying companies that hire inexperienced drivers.

TBH, I have seriously considered switching to food grade tanker from dry van more than once. Prime has been on my short list if I decide to take that leap.

double-quotes-end.png

tsk tsk. I thought you were supposed to be going local.

I did look. Wife kept saying NO. If I ever convince the wife, I WILL look again, lol. Going local is my wife's decision, not mine. But, you know what they say: "Happy wife, happy life." The worst part I am not liking what I am seeing in ads. Yard hostler, switcher positions, etc... I really don't want to do local. Day out, day back would be perfect for me. Alas, I don't know if I will find something like that. I still have until October to convince the wife of other ideas. Although she is dead set on forcing me to do local. Maybe in 3 months I will get lucky and the dairy farm in Russellville, KY will be looking for drivers again. I will get to drive tanker and the wife will get a local position for me.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

If you are looking at food grade, take a look at Prime. They have a NE regional for food grade tanker as well. Also Prime is one of the best paying companies that hire inexperienced drivers.

TBH, I have seriously considered switching to food grade tanker from dry van more than once. Prime has been on my short list if I decide to take that leap.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

tsk tsk. I thought you were supposed to be going local.

double-quotes-end.png

I did look. Wife kept saying NO. If I ever convince the wife, I WILL look again, lol. Going local is my wife's decision, not mine. But, you know what they say: "Happy wife, happy life." The worst part I am not liking what I am seeing in ads. Yard hostler, switcher positions, etc... I really don't want to do local. Day out, day back would be perfect for me. Alas, I don't know if I will find something like that. I still have until October to convince the wife of other ideas. Although she is dead set on forcing me to do local. Maybe in 3 months I will get lucky and the dairy farm in Russellville, KY will be looking for drivers again. I will get to drive tanker and the wife will get a local position for me.

I was somewhat skeptical about going local. I could tell OTR wasn't healthy for us (and my health!) but my wife insisted repeatedly. She clearly was tired of being alone all the time.

Change is tough especially when you're already established at your current company.

I was worried about the loss of pay mostly. I knew I couldn't ever match what I was making as a L/O at Prime but I at least wanted to match what I was making as a company driver at Prime. Fortunately, I'm making more than I was as a company driver at Prime without the high cost of food to eat on the road and I can be home every day to enjoy my bed and pets.

I would suggest 2 things:

First, dont look for a job on craigslist. I've noticed those jobs are pretty much the bottom of the barrel jobs that no one else wants. When youre home write down all the local companies you see and just call them one at a time. I think you have a lot of value to your name and I think you can get a top notch job in your area, the struggle is to find it.

Secondly, you should know this by now. Your wife is always right! Stop thinking and just listen to her!

smile.gif

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Patrick C.'s Comment
member avatar

It will put the lotion on it's skin or it will get the hose again. It will do as it's told! LoL.

I still have 3 months. I know I need to kinda start looking, but then again until I hit a year, kinda a moot point.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Bud A.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

If you are looking at food grade, take a look at Prime. They have a NE regional for food grade tanker as well. Also Prime is one of the best paying companies that hire inexperienced drivers.

TBH, I have seriously considered switching to food grade tanker from dry van more than once. Prime has been on my short list if I decide to take that leap.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

tsk tsk. I thought you were supposed to be going local.

double-quotes-end.png

We could really use another local guy on our side. Me and 6string are way outnumbered.

I just started a local job, out and back every day, 300 mile radius max. There might be an occasional overnight run, but from what I was told it will be rare. I am still getting used to not living in the truck and eating regular home-cooked meals. It's pretty nice so far.

I found this job advertised on indeed.com. It was also on Craigslist. I agree though, Craigslist doesn't always have the best jobs advertised. It kind of depends on the area.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

It will put the lotion on it's skin or it will get the hose again. It will do as it's told! LoL.

It puts the lotion in the basket.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

It's funny, because I find myself really getting used to just driving and being in the truck by midweek. I almost have to readjust to be at home on the weekends. And then by my first day back, I'm missing my family and having to readjust to being in the truck again. Since I work a 5 day work week, it's like a constant cycle.

Don't get me wrong ... I'm certainly not complaining! It just takes adjustment to be around people after you're used to being in the truck by yourself.

Mark D.'s Comment
member avatar

I am finding it difficult to find local tanker , need more experience I guess . For me the question is do I want to do chemicals again with a large company like Quality Carriers or haul food grade with a relatively smaller company like Caledonia Haulers. Are things like medical costs and 401k better with the larger companies , or is it more a case of which truck do you like to drive Pete or Mack. Is it beneficial to go with larger haulers because of more customers etc or is it better to go with smaller because that means you get more runs ? I wish I could decide

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Chemical Tanker Food Grade Tanker HAZMAT Tanker
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