OTR As A Family Man

Topic 20520 | Page 2

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G-Town's Comment
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Paul...any advice Brett or any of the moderators offer is backed with truth, integrity, knowledge, and experience. Although my children are grown, my advice to Aaron is based upon my faith, my experience as a father, and the knowledge that if he really wants this (same for you), he will make it work. Regardless, professional truck driving, especially OTR can be summed up with one word; "lifestyle". It's a lifestyle that is further complicated whenever a young family is involved. I cannot and will not tell anyone what to do in a situation like this, or what is right or wrong for them. I just know what has worked for me and others on this forum. If a person has a high degree of doubt or mitigating circumstances, like Aaron and possibly you as well, any effort to work through that needs to occur before the first day of school, otherwise the risk of failure on either front is likely.

Good luck to you both. We are here to help, even if a conclusion contrary to becoming a professional truck driver is best.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Harry H. [ navypoppop ]'s Comment
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Paul, No harm was intended as I was trying to express the difference that Aaron M. receives with earned income credit vs. without that deduction. He might enjoy the earned income credit that is available to him with a lower limited income. My son has always enjoyed his because of being military with a wife and 2 children his taxable income is less than average. Please do not take apart my comment as I wasn't trying to put blame or shame into the mix just the fact that with being on the road he might not enjoy the benefit of the earned income credit. I too enjoyed paying my fair share of taxes to both the federal and state for my income and whatever my return was so be it. I meant no harm.

Paul's Comment
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Paul, No harm was intended as I was trying to express the difference that Aaron M. receives with earned income credit vs. without that deduction. He might enjoy the earned income credit that is available to him with a lower limited income. My son has always enjoyed his because of being military with a wife and 2 children his taxable income is less than average. Please do not take apart my comment as I wasn't trying to put blame or shame into the mix just the fact that with being on the road he might not enjoy the benefit of the earned income credit. I too enjoyed paying my fair share of taxes to both the federal and state for my income and whatever my return was so be it. I meant no harm.

You are right, I picked apart your comment unfairly. I apologise. Good points all around.

G-Town's Comment
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Preacher Paul wrote:

G-town, by the way, you rock man. :-)

Wow, thank you so much Paul, highly appreciated. God only knows, I try... but alas, some days you're the bat, and some days,...you're the ball. Keep on truckin' !!! smile.gif

Paul's Comment
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Preacher Paul wrote:

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G-town, by the way, you rock man. :-)

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Wow, thank you so much Paul, highly appreciated. God only knows, I try... but alas, some days you're the bat, and some days,...you're the ball. Keep on truckin' !!! smile.gif

I don't know...I see you more as a pool cue, lining up the shots to get the balls to go right where you want them.... :-)

Aaron M.'s Comment
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My mind is made on this decision. I'm just irked by the constant feedback from all around that I'm making a mistake just because I have a family. Yeah, I have a family, and therefore I need money, more then I otherwise would.

I do not have one acquisitive bone in my body. I do not care about material possessions. I don't need money so that I can go buy stuff that I don't need. I need money to provide a roof, food, medical insurance, and the best quality of life that I can possibly provide for my family. The only thing I've ever wanted was my time, good food, and good beersmile.gif

At 37 years old, and getting older, I asked myself what it is that I wanted out of life now. The answer to that question was to provide for my family. That's really all that I want. After that I'd like some good food and beer (obviously on my limited days off).

Up north you can do the snow plow hustle in the winter if you are a landscaper, but in the south that's not an option. We get snow maybe twice a year and it's usually gone by the second day. Around here you have to land contracts, be they commercial, or home owners willing to pay you a set amount every month...even when you do nothing for them. Apparently some guys can sell that. I can't even sell the idea to myself much less one of my clients. Why would you pay me $200 a month for 4 months to do noting for you? However, there Is more to it. What if I get hurt? I'm a one man show, and in my business you've got about 4 weeks before people start replacing you with the next guy. Anyone can run a lawn care business. You need a truck, a mower, a weed eater, a blower, and a jerry can and you've got a business.

I'm all in. Roehl has already spent money on me for the physical and drug tests. I'm just on here fleshing out the last bit of doubt and looking for encouragement. If things work out I'll share my experience on this forum.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Paul's Comment
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Well, you've got encouragement from me. I wish you the best. Roehl seems like a good company. It was between them and Prime for me, and it was a tossup. Good luck man, and God bless you on your journeys. Remember, any BAC at all will get you a 24 hour suspension! rofl-1.gif High Road Training...man it's in my head all the time. I even dream it!

What part of the south are you from? What you're describing sounds like Oklahoma. We get four months a year of brown everything followed by far too much grass. I need to mow right now, actually.

G-Town's Comment
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Paul wrote:

Remember, any BAC at all will get you a 24 hour suspension!

No sir. A trace amount of alcohol on a random is grounds for termination and make it very difficult to re-enter the business. Zero tolerance.

Paul's Comment
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Paul wrote:

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Remember, any BAC at all will get you a 24 hour suspension!

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No sir. A trace amount of alcohol on a random is grounds for termination and make it very difficult to re-enter the business. Zero tolerance.

Shoot...time to hit the books again. I could've sworn that it was automatic 24 hour Out of service for a trace amount. Back to the High Road I go.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Paul wrote:

Shoot...time to hit the books again. I could've sworn that it was automatic 24 hour Out of service for a trace amount. Back to the High Road I go.

Not about HighRoad or DOT. It's company policy for most all carriers, which supersedes enerything else.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

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