High Road Training

Topic 20988 | Page 1

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Jim F.'s Comment
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Has anyone here gone through the High Road training on this web site and applied it at school? How did it work for you? I'm cramming with it before I start Swift academy in Jan. Already got my learners permit.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Jim the High Road is a tremendous tool to work and prepare your mind for school. It will definitely help with pre-trip inspection and hours of service (HOS) concepts.

Good luck.

Pre-trip Inspection:

A pre-trip inspection is a thorough inspection of the truck completed before driving for the first time each day.

Federal and state laws require that drivers inspect their vehicles. Federal and state inspectors also may inspect your vehicles. If they judge a vehicle to be unsafe, they will put it “out of service” until it is repaired.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
B Team's Comment
member avatar

My wife and I studied the High Road Training for about 3 months prior to starting CDL school. I cannot begin to tell you how much it helped us. We aced all of the elements and endorsements when we tested at the DMV. In our classes, we have been able to tutor the other students on HOV rules as well. If you complete and pass the High Road Training, you will not have any problem with these areas in school. You can concentrate on your driving skills (shifting/backing/pretrip). The videos and checklists on pretrip are also invaluable. Thank you to Daniel B for that one! And thanks again to Brett and the moderators for all that they offer!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

B Team's Comment
member avatar

By the way, HOV should be HOS. Hours of service. Autocorrect can reall do some silly things.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Jim F.'s Comment
member avatar

I was so hoping to hear this. I've read some horror stories about people attending these schools unprepared and they get chewed up and spit out very quickly. Thank you guys for your input and encouragement. So I take it you and your wife drive team now? My wife and I both work for the school district here in our little town. Her a teacher and me the Maint director. We have both come to the conclusion that working for a state run institution sucks, considering the amount of time and grief ( shoving their political ideology down our throats) we have to put up with. Our schools have become "snow flake factories". (topic for another time and place) The pay isn't all that bad considering where we live, but at this point in our lives trucking is calling big time. I'm having a hard time sleeping i'm so jazzed about doing this. The wifey is still on the fence about her driving but I'm all in and she supports me. Like I'mentioned, I have my learners permit /w no restrictions,did my TSA clearance ( can't remember what it's called) and got my DOT physical out of they way. Other than cramming the High Road training is there anything else I should be doing? I have even gone so far as looking up and old friend to see if I can do some ride along. He's a owner op. I've heard lots of advice about attending these schools with a positive attitude and stellar work ethic which I can say has been something I have excelled at in my life. No problems there.

Once again, Thanks for taking the time guys.

My wife and I studied the High Road Training for about 3 months prior to starting CDL school. I cannot begin to tell you how much it helped us. We aced all of the elements and endorsements when we tested at the DMV. In our classes, we have been able to tutor the other students on HOV rules as well. If you complete and pass the High Road Training, you will not have any problem with these areas in school. You can concentrate on your driving skills (shifting/backing/pretrip). The videos and checklists on pretrip are also invaluable. Thank you to Daniel B for that one! And thanks again to Brett and the moderators for all that they offer!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar
I've read some horror stories about people attending these schools unprepared and they get chewed up and spit out very quickly

Preparation is indeed important. The failure rate is about 70%. Much of that is due to failed drug tests, failing the physical, lack of effort and commitment.

There are many success stories here written by drivers who graduated from a Company-Sponsored Training Programs.

My number one suggestion to anyone headed to school is eliminate all the head-trash; the distractions, the negativity and doubt that can compromise focus.

Approach school as the starting line fir the longest job interview of your life.

Good luck.

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Jim, not sure if you have seen these two links:

Truck Driver's Career Guide

Becoming A Truck Driver: The Raw Truth About Truck Driving

Considering your recent inquiries I think these two links will prove helpful. As far as the pre-trip inspection; by the time you reach the middle of your first week at Swift, you will be practicing PTI every morning up until the time you pass the test. You will have two opportunities to pass. I also suggest taking time each and every night the study/review all of the PTI steps, to the point of identifying 2-3 study partners to practice "reciting" chapter and verse.

One of the best pre-trip resources Trucking Truth has available is this link built by one of your Moderators, Daniel. Click these links:

I graduated from Swift’s Richmond Academy over 5 years ago, completed the 240 hours (it’s now 200) of mentoring and DID not have a negative experience, quite the opposite. That said, it’s virtually impossible for a mentor/trainer to cover every aspect of what you need and what you can expect once solo. It’s a foundation you must build upon. I cannot over-emphasize the need to be your own advocate during training, do what is best for “you”.

There is a lot of information on training both in the Forum and in the Blog section. Using the search facility, I strongly suggest reviewing some of the more relevant training threads.

Good luck.

Pre-trip Inspection:

A pre-trip inspection is a thorough inspection of the truck completed before driving for the first time each day.

Federal and state laws require that drivers inspect their vehicles. Federal and state inspectors also may inspect your vehicles. If they judge a vehicle to be unsafe, they will put it “out of service” until it is repaired.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Jim F.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks G-Town. I'm already about half way through the book.

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