1 Year License Req, Org USA License, Os Lic, Now Back To Usa

Topic 21187 | Page 1

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Tom S.'s Comment
member avatar

OK so I have been digging around the forums a bit and I think my situation is slightly unique, so much as I haven't found and answer to my question. So I a us citizen and got my class 3 (car) license when I was 16 and held it until I was roughly 25. From 24 to 35 I have lived over seas and held a class 2 truck license (ridged vehicle single axle max gvm 18 tonne). I'm now moving back to the us and getting a us license again (class 3). So I guess my question is does the one year license apply in my situation? Any advice or leads would greatly be appreciated.

Cheers, T

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Tom, I honestly do not know the answer to your question. If you know which state you are going to be living in, I would start looking into their web site, and or make a few phone calls to their Motor Vehicle department and ask about it. I realize that is not very helpful, but maybe someone will come along with some experience in this situation that can better answer you.

Best of luck, and if you find something out we'd love for you to share that information with us so that we can help others in the future with your unique situation.

Tom S.'s Comment
member avatar

Tom, I honestly do not know the answer to your question. If you know which state you are going to be living in, I would start looking into their web site, and or make a few phone calls to their Motor Vehicle department and ask about it. I realize that is not very helpful, but maybe someone will come along with some experience in this situation that can better answer you.

Best of luck, and if you find something out we'd love for you to share that information with us so that we can help others in the future with your unique situation.

Yea getting the class 3 is no drama as I'm over 21. I'll be in Maine and as far as I can tell there no restrictions on the cdl other than you have to be over 21 for interstate and the 14 day permit. I thought it was mostly a company rule for the one year bit, or am I totally off kilter and its a dot thing?

Cheers, T

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Old School's Comment
member avatar
I thought it was mostly a company rule for the one year bit, or am I totally off kilter and its a dot thing?

Actually it is neither. You are going to find that some companies require a two year period of holding a regular drivers license, and some of them will require that it be recent. This will not be the case with everyone though. It isn't really a D.O.T. rule either. It is a state rule as best I can tell, and there are a few states that don't have that requirement. I think Florida is one of them, but I am not sure about the others.

The commercial license is a funny creature in that the state's all have their own rules about it, and some of them go beyond what the federal requirements actually call for. It is still a license that is issued by the state of your residence, so wherever you declare your residency, then that is the state where your license will be issued. Welcome back to the sometimes confusing way we do things here in the "United" States!

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Tom S.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I thought it was mostly a company rule for the one year bit, or am I totally off kilter and its a dot thing?

double-quotes-end.png

Actually it is neither. You are going to find that some companies require a two year period of holding a regular drivers license, and some of them will require that it be recent. This will not be the case with everyone though. It isn't really a D.O.T. rule either. It is a state rule as best I can tell, and there are a few states that don't have that requirement. I think Florida is one of them, but I am not sure about the others.

The commercial license is a funny creature in that the state's all have their own rules about it, and some of them go beyond what the federal requirements actually call for. It is still a license that is issued by the state of your residence, so wherever you declare your residency, then that is the state where your license will be issued. Welcome back to the sometimes confusing way we do things here in the "United" States!

Ahh cheers, I just had a quick google and I can't find any minimums other than being 21 and no DUI in the last 2 years both of which I have no dramas with. But in my googling I came across some confusion. I'm hoping to look at primes driver training program so I had a peek at Missouri's cdl DVM page and found something that seemed to contradict it self. Maybe I'm just confused, do you change your DL from your home state to there then back after you get your cdl? I'm sorry for asking silly questions, I've just got used to a rather small and simple government system and the us system completely blows my fragile little mind haha.

Cheers, T

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

DUI:

Driving Under the Influence

Michael S.'s Comment
member avatar

Tom, many states have reciprocal arrangements with other states, provinces, and countries. For example when I moved from California to Ontario and went to get a driver's license I was able to transfer my license from California. That is, I did not need to take a written or driving test and my record was set up to reflect most (not all) of the years I had held the California license - it was five years IIRC.

So I arrived in Ontario, and had a new license with at least five years of driving experience on it.

If I had traveled the other way, I'd have had a similar result in California as the state and the province recognize each others licenses. Now this probably doesn't answer what you asked, but you may be credited with more than zero years of experience.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Tom, it's confusing - I'm not even sure I'm giving you the correct information, so if I'm wrong, hopefully someone will correct me. If you train in Missouri, they will require a Missouri permit, and will issue you a Missouri license. Prime has a way to set up a temporary residency for you so that you can do that. Then you must return to your home state and get your license transferred to that state.

A Prime recruiter should be able to help you get all this stuff straight, but they may not be all that interested in being really helpful until you have submitted an application.

We have several Prime drivers in here, so hopefully they can help us out with this.

BMI:

Body mass index (BMI)

BMI is a formula that uses weight and height to estimate body fat. For most people, BMI provides a reasonable estimate of body fat. The BMI's biggest weakness is that it doesn't consider individual factors such as bone or muscle mass. BMI may:

  • Underestimate body fat for older adults or other people with low muscle mass
  • Overestimate body fat for people who are very muscular and physically fit

It's quite common, especially for men, to fall into the "overweight" category if you happen to be stronger than average. If you're pretty strong but in good shape then pay no attention.

Tom S.'s Comment
member avatar

Tom, many states have reciprocal arrangements with other states, provinces, and countries. For example when I moved from California to Ontario and went to get a driver's license I was able to transfer my license from California. That is, I did not need to take a written or driving test and my record was set up to reflect most (not all) of the years I had held the California license - it was five years IIRC.

So I arrived in Ontario, and had a new license with at least five years of driving experience on it.

If I had traveled the other way, I'd have had a similar result in California as the state and the province recognize each others licenses. Now this probably doesn't answer what you asked, but you may be credited with more than zero years of experience.

Cheers let's hope so, I mean I can provide records of my Maine and Washington licenses, as well as records from over seas. Let's hope its worth something, 19 years of driving should count for something haha.

Michael S.'s Comment
member avatar

For a reciprocal license you need to transfer it in the proper time frame. As I said, I could be way off base, but it's worth a shot.

Good luck

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