You Run Out Of Time On 14 Hr. What Do You Do?

Topic 21198 | Page 3

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Mark .'s Comment
member avatar

Park on the street if you can (usually won't trip the elogs if you're quick). If you can't, and this is something I've done, go ahead and drive to the nearest safe place to park knowing the elogs will throw you a violation and call your company to explain. They can sometimes remove the violation on their end.

Sorry, I messed up on a previous post and didn't include the quote.

If a company removes a violation, is that legal (what authority does a company have to remove a violation)? Isn't the DOT the only one who can excuse a violation?

Elog:

Electronic Onboard Recorder

Electronic Logbook

A device which records the amount of time a vehicle has been driven. If the vehicle is not being driven, the operator will manually input whether or not he/she is on duty or not.

Elogs:

Electronic Onboard Recorder

Electronic Logbook

A device which records the amount of time a vehicle has been driven. If the vehicle is not being driven, the operator will manually input whether or not he/she is on duty or not.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Matt M.'s Comment
member avatar

Different companies track hour violations differently, Prime for example uses a point system. Im actually not sure how they discipline folks that get too many points. In any event what your company does will NOT protect you from DOT.

G-town, that's probably the first time I've ever heard that phrase used in earnest, but no worries either way.

I read through that thread before I posted here, and I might join the discussion. I'm about to hit the hay after a long day driving, but off the cuff:

Cops write bogus tickets all the time, every day there are tickets dismissed in courts, and many more that probably stand due to the inconvenience in fighting them (particularly for OTR drivers). Maybe the cop misunderstood the regulation, or maybe WV has regulations that differ from fmcsa (not sure if that's possible). How many cops understand the 8/2 split and could find a violation of it in a paper log? Not many i would wager.

Regardless, the Prime driver was pulled over for speeding. There is a very small chance you are going to pull a log inspection in the short time you are using personal conveyance. Any Prime log audits are going to come from MO, who I am fairly certain blessed our current line 5 rules. The most likely case you are going to be "caught" with line 5 on an inspection is getting an inspection through a scale or being pulled over for something else.

My wife and I have 600,000 some odd miles in a Prime truck, we have received 5 total inspections. 3 when my wife was pulled over (a bogus warning, a valid warning due to an improper repair at a t/a, and a valid ticket for running a scale), and 2 random inspections. 4 times once they saw we had e-logs they didn't bother looking at them. 1 of my randoms the lady had me flip through the graphs for the last 7 days. It's just not very likely you will even be asked about line 5 here.

We are actually headed to Springfield right now to get the truck serviced. If we are still there during banking hours I'm going to try to catch Wendee, my log auditor, and ask her about this. Then I can probably offer more regarding this subject.

Speaking of which, I would encourage Turtle, Rainy, or any other Prime drivers that are skeptical of using line 5 to speak to their log auditor about it. I've visited Wendee a couple times in person, and have called her once, and she has always been receptive to questions. They want us legal and following the rules. Really that goes for all the department's here, whether it's permits, safety, dispatch, whomever.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

FMCSA:

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

The FMCSA was established within the Department of Transportation on January 1, 2000. Their primary mission is to prevent commercial motor vehicle-related fatalities and injuries.

What Does The FMCSA Do?

  • Commercial Drivers' Licenses
  • Data and Analysis
  • Regulatory Compliance and Enforcement
  • Research and Technology
  • Safety Assistance
  • Support and Information Sharing

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

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