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What did you do before becoming a truck driver?

Topic 7924 | Page 10

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Papa G's Comment
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Some people were chiming in on Laura T.'s "I hate Nursing" topic about what they did before they became interested in trucking. I put the question in the title for others to tell what they did "before".

I taught middle school math and science for eleven years. Finally I "had it" with both student attitude and administration pressure to get my students to pass the annual testing.

Also, rookie truckers make just about as much as rookie teachers do, without all that college!

So, what did you do in your "previous life"?

Environmental Geologist, but spent the last 8 years exploring North, Central, and South America aboard my sailboat. Now I am starting a new chapter in my life, and I am very excited. I begin my CDL school on Monday! Yeah You Right!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Ralph G. ( Arejay )'s Comment
member avatar

Medical.

Thanks for the explanation, Errol.

You are correct. Massage is considered medical ...

And I must say I appreciate your posts!

Yeah, he could have put it under Cosmetololgy. shocked.pngrofl-3.gif

Tom W.'s Comment
member avatar

After college, I spent a few years in banking. Loved it for 3 years but decided it was time to pick up and move from NYC area to Charlotte, NC as I was young and wanted to experience life in another part of our great nation (love North Carolina, by the way). For various reasons, I stopped enjoying my work in banking and eventually got out. Bounced around doing various things including managing a restaurant, selling hearing aids, and even sold car stereos out of the back of my car. Eventually settled into working for my church for 15 years, the last 8 of which were as facilities manager. When they decided to outsource my department, I found myself unemployed. This coincided with rupturing a disc in my neck. After a few months of pretty bad pain, I had surgery to replace the disc, which went very well (it's amazing what they can do these days!). During that time, the job search really suffered. Since then, I've been able to gain back all my strength and then some, am getting into better shape overall, and just recently got a part-time gig working for Lowe's. However, I need to get back on a successful career track and am seriously considering trucking. I love this site and have really enjoyed reading the other posts on this thread.

Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

After college, I spent a few years in banking. Loved it for 3 years but decided it was time to pick up and move from NYC area to Charlotte, NC as I was young and wanted to experience life in another part of our great nation (love North Carolina, by the way). For various reasons, I stopped enjoying my work in banking and eventually got out. Bounced around doing various things including managing a restaurant, selling hearing aids, and even sold car stereos out of the back of my car. Eventually settled into working for my church for 15 years, the last 8 of which were as facilities manager. When they decided to outsource my department, I found myself unemployed. This coincided with rupturing a disc in my neck. After a few months of pretty bad pain, I had surgery to replace the disc, which went very well (it's amazing what they can do these days!). During that time, the job search really suffered. Since then, I've been able to gain back all my strength and then some, am getting into better shape overall, and just recently got a part-time gig working for Lowe's. However, I need to get back on a successful career track and am seriously considering trucking. I love this site and have really enjoyed reading the other posts on this thread.

I used to work at Lowes too! I was in Lumber & Building Materials for 2 years.

Dennis S.'s Comment
member avatar
double-quotes-start.png

After college, I spent a few years in banking. Loved it for 3 years but decided it was time to pick up and move from NYC area to Charlotte, NC as I was young and wanted to experience life in another part of our great nation (love North Carolina, by the way). For various reasons, I stopped enjoying my work in banking and eventually got out. Bounced around doing various things including managing a restaurant, selling hearing aids, and even sold car stereos out of the back of my car. Eventually settled into working for my church for 15 years, the last 8 of which were as facilities manager. When they decided to outsource my department, I found myself unemployed. This coincided with rupturing a disc in my neck. After a few months of pretty bad pain, I had surgery to replace the disc, which went very well (it's amazing what they can do these days!). During that time, the job search really suffered. Since then, I've been able to gain back all my strength and then some, am getting into better shape overall, and just recently got a part-time gig working for Lowe's. However, I need to get back on a successful career track and am seriously considering trucking. I love this site and have really enjoyed reading the other posts on this thread.

double-quotes-end.png

I used to work at Lowes too! I was in Lumber & Building Materials for 2 years.

I used to work at a Lowe's store, in lumber and millwork depts from 1998-2001. Great job part was also looking into truck driver training options. Bounced around there and contract Security at a oil companies before finding Stevens Transport. With paid training in 02.

J. Snow's Comment
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Bartending and Server most recently. Prior to the great recession I had been in IT since High School. Oh I've been an Uber driver too this past year. :)

Dave H.'s Comment
member avatar

Army Infantry. Spent some time as a sniper in a scout platoon. Did a plethora of other random jobs as well since I'm a jack of all trades kind of guy. Then I got my pink slip as they made budget cuts. I intended to stay for the full 20 but only got to 12. Now I just go the one weekend a month thing. Here I am!

Was a mechanic right out of high school. Got lucky in that I got started without any schooling and made decent money for my age, and I like working on cars and working with my hands. I LOVE trying something new most people wont try (like painting body panels) because I like to push myself a little bit to excel in the things I enjoy. But I couldn't do it on my own terms, specifically too many instances where people wanted me to cut corners...something I never liked, especially if my name was on my work. Too much emphasis on 'right now' and not 'right'.

Car Washer Mac's Comment
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Worked in the food industry in high school. When I was 17 I left my job as a busboy to go work for my dad as a law clerk in his law firm. We worked from home so I didn't leave the house unless I needed to go to the store for supplies or to drop a letter in the mail. On my 18th birthday, I sent in my application to UPS. A buddy of mine put in a good word and I was hired. I started work right after graduation as a part time package handler. One year later, and 90 pounds lighter, I'm still at UPS, waiting to turn 21 so I can live my dream of driving OTR.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Darren R.'s Comment
member avatar

After spending 5.5 years in the Coast Guard, I was honorably discharged with my Associates in EET, and back then I thought, IT jobs for life. Now I'd rather take my smart phone and toss it in the lake! I recently moved back to northern Utah a couple of years ago, and started the loop in various IT jobs in the area. I've spent the last 8 months doing Dish's for a national satellite TV provider. My last job in Montana before making the move back to Utah to be closer to family, drove me past a CDL training school. And everyday for 6 years I kept thinking, "what it be like to check out the country". So I started checking out the 2 CDL schools in my area. The 1st one in Ogden, for some reason, just didn't set well with me? But after meeting with the folks at Bridgerland Community College in Logan, Utah I decided this feels right. I've pre paid for the course and I begin on May 18th. I've also been talking to a few of the local companies, following the advise on this web page about pre hiring? I'm looking forward to it. But if anyone here has had some bad experiences with this school, then please let me know? I did read a story about things to look for in schools, and one thing left me concerned. The advise was to stay away from schools that do not have job placement? Bridgerland is very clear on the fact they do not have job placement. But they have instructors that work for local companies? Plus the course outline covers everything? Or at least it seems too? I'm 42, so I guess I just figured that regardless of the school, its up to the individual to do the leg work to land the job? I planned this for months, so I'm not worried about the tuition reimbursement, because I saved up the money for that, and to cover the bills for the 2 months I'll be in the course.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Slowpoke's Comment
member avatar

Well, I delivered pizzas in my hometown after graduation in 1984 until I went to a truck driving school, home study on site 2 week driving training in 1987. I drove for a local farmer until 1989 when my then wife talked me into going to work at the same factory as her because at the time the pay was a bit better....Got divorced in 1996 and since I left me chauffeur's license expire I went to a community college CDL program. Been driving truck now since 1997.. I've just about everything in this industry except over size and car hauling.

My wife and I report Monday to orientation to an expediting company to run for them in a class B truck all 48 with our puppy ;)

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
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