Split Sleeper Question

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JakeBreak's Comment
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Maybe one of you guys that know the hos inside and out can help me with this. I have an appt at 10am tomorrow, im about 75-80 miles away, and i have 1hr and 40 mins left on my 70. Is it legal to just use the 8hr sleeper part to extend my 14hr on duty so i can use the time i have left on my 70 then take a 10hr break at the customer or do i have to do both to follow the laws. Of all the hos laws this one is the hardest to wrap my head around and i need it otherwise i gotta hope i got enough time to get there

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
guyjax(Guy Hodges)'s Comment
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Maybe one of you guys that know the hos inside and out can help me with this. I have an appt at 10am tomorrow, im about 75-80 miles away, and i have 1hr and 40 mins left on my 70. Is it legal to just use the 8hr sleeper part to extend my 14hr on duty so i can use the time i have left on my 70 then take a 10hr break at the customer or do i have to do both to follow the laws. Of all the hos laws this one is the hardest to wrap my head around and i need it otherwise i gotta hope i got enough time to get there

14 hours is 14 hours. I could be wrong cause I never use the split sleeper rule nor do I have to but the 14 hour rule can not be extended under normal driving situations. Those that use it might chime in and know a bit more about it. In 17 years I have never used it.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
JakeBreak's Comment
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See thats where its confusing, because im sure i read somewhere that the 8hr part of the split extends your 14hr day but i want to be sure before i really mess myself up. I wish there was a stupid 70hr clock n id be fine lol

Max E.'s Comment
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This is one of the most confusing parts of the log book.. this is how I understand it.

If you use an 8/2 split this is how it works.

If you take 8 hours in the sleeper then it extends your previous clocks.. for example if you had 3 hours driving time and 4 hours left on duty at the end of 8 hours you could start again and have 3 hours driving and 4 hours on duty.

This is where it gets tricky.. at the end of this you can take your 10 hour break and reset all your clocks. OR if you take a 2 hour break it makes it so where you started your split after the 8 hour break becomes the start of your new 14/11 hour clock. For example: you had 3 hours drive time and 4 hours on duty left.. you take an 8 hour break and start moving to get to an appointment. You start after your break at 6am. You have 4 hours of on duty and 3 hours of drive time left. It takes you 2 hours to get there and an hour of unloading so now it is now 9am. You take a 2 hour break so now it is 11am. Your current clock reflects your 6am start time so you would have 9 hours left of on duty and driving time left.

Hope this makes any since at all. hahahaha this is complicated.. but this is how it works.

JakeBreak's Comment
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Yeah see thats what i want to do is just use the 8hr sleeper part to extend my 14hr clock to be able to use recap hrs to make it to my appt. My other option is to sit here til 130 am and then drive but since i didnt actually sleep that wouldnt be safe. Im only about 2 hrs away so i need to make my start late enough that i can pick up some recaps after midnight

Daniel B.'s Comment
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Here's your answer from someone who uses the Split Sleeper Berth on a weekly basis.

You have enough time on your 70 to get there. Spend 8 hours on SB then drive to customer. At customer log yourself 2 consecutive hours Off-Duty while you do your business with them and you'll extend that 14 hour clock. Then use your remaining 70 hour clock and drive drive to the nearest truck stop and take the day off.

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

JakeBreak's Comment
member avatar

Here's your answer from someone who uses the Split Sleeper Berth on a weekly basis.

You have enough time on your 70 to get there. Spend 8 hours on SB then drive to customer. At customer log yourself 2 consecutive hours Off-Duty while you do your business with them and you'll extend that 14 hour clock. Then use your remaining 70 hour clock and drive drive to the nearest truck stop and take the day off.

Ok but that would put me in the red before i get loaded i think. My appt is at 10am i was going to drive there and get a 10 hr break in and go from there. I would just drive my 70 off and stop but im in stupid jersey where theres nowhere to park unless you pay for it and i was told to avoid it if at all possible so im trying to be creative and earn brownie points lol

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar
double-quotes-start.png

Here's your answer from someone who uses the Split Sleeper Berth on a weekly basis.

You have enough time on your 70 to get there. Spend 8 hours on SB then drive to customer. At customer log yourself 2 consecutive hours Off-Duty while you do your business with them and you'll extend that 14 hour clock. Then use your remaining 70 hour clock and drive drive to the nearest truck stop and take the day off.

double-quotes-end.png

Ok but that would put me in the red before i get loaded i think. My appt is at 10am i was going to drive there and get a 10 hr break in and go from there. I would just drive my 70 off and stop but im in stupid jersey where theres nowhere to park unless you pay for it and i was told to avoid it if at all possible so im trying to be creative and earn brownie points lol

You can use Off Duty Driving if you have the option. I would just park at the truck stop even if they charge a fee. Pay with cash and don't submit a receipt - no brownie points lost. You're better off not trying to pull a miracle. A small parking fee hurts much less than an HoS violation.

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

BMI:

Body mass index (BMI)

BMI is a formula that uses weight and height to estimate body fat. For most people, BMI provides a reasonable estimate of body fat. The BMI's biggest weakness is that it doesn't consider individual factors such as bone or muscle mass. BMI may:

  • Underestimate body fat for older adults or other people with low muscle mass
  • Overestimate body fat for people who are very muscular and physically fit

It's quite common, especially for men, to fall into the "overweight" category if you happen to be stronger than average. If you're pretty strong but in good shape then pay no attention.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
JakeBreak's Comment
member avatar

Its ok i feel like such a dummy lol im only 2hrs away but my 14 doesnt expire until 1am so as long as i leave at 1030 itll all be good ill get there at 1230 and just do a 10hr break. These time zones are confusing lol. My logs are in central time and im in eastern so somehow i had it all messed up i thought my 14 expired at midnight. So no need to mess myself up with split sleeper

JakeBreak's Comment
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Thanks for trying to help me out daniel i hope one day ill be able to wrap my head around the split sleeper thing

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