PTI Vs ATI

Topic 10034 | Page 1

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:
Ezcore's Comment
member avatar

Whats the point of After Trip Inspection if you are a bout to drop a load off and pick up one right after the other? Wouldn't you just do another Pre-trip-inspection again? Also if you are team trucking why do you need to do After trip inspection if your teamate is going to do another pre trip inspection? I'm very ingorant to all of this obviously and do not understand.

I plan on going to CDL company/school (CRST) next 20 days and just very cofnused a bout the whole journey.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
JakeBreak's Comment
member avatar

The way it was explained to me was that the pretrip inspection is to make sure the truck is safe to drive. Checking fluids and the all important kingpin and stuff like that. The post trip is just to make sure that nothing broke during the day, like a radiator hose or a tire started going flat. Stuff that can be repaired during your 10 hr break so you dont lose a bunch of time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Ezcore is confused:

Whats the point of After Trip Inspection if you are a bout to drop a load off and pick up one right after the other? Wouldn't you just do another Pre-trip-inspection again?

Your question seems to be - do you preform a pre-trip inspection like you were taught & had to pass for your CDL between trips - "between" dropping and hooking trailers?

If that's the case, not exactly. The official under the hood/brakes/in-cab inspection is the pre-trip you do at the start of your driving shift. When you hook up a new trailer, you need to do a shorter pre-trip on the trailer. Make sure the trailer is hooked up properly, no air leaks, brakes look good, etc. This "pre-trip" is not documented anywhere, though you do it for safety and regulation compliance.

Pre-trip Inspection:

A pre-trip inspection is a thorough inspection of the truck completed before driving for the first time each day.

Federal and state laws require that drivers inspect their vehicles. Federal and state inspectors also may inspect your vehicles. If they judge a vehicle to be unsafe, they will put it “out of service” until it is repaired.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Ezcore's Comment
member avatar

Thanks for the replys guys!

Also I read in my Georgia CDL manual that 15 minutes has to be taken to do the pre-trip inspection so that it shows on records I have done it? So when people look back on my log I guess they can see I took 15 minutes out of my 14hrs to do the pre-trip-inspection? I'm confused a bout that part greatly, because why can't I check my load (PTI) then start my clock?...

I bet i'm going to annoy a bunch of people with my rookie questions.

Also i'd like to add again that i'm going to be team trucking for CRST hopfully (Thats the plan at least for the first year of my trucking career till I can get a flatbed company).

Pre-trip Inspection:

A pre-trip inspection is a thorough inspection of the truck completed before driving for the first time each day.

Federal and state laws require that drivers inspect their vehicles. Federal and state inspectors also may inspect your vehicles. If they judge a vehicle to be unsafe, they will put it “out of service” until it is repaired.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Ezcore's Comment
member avatar

Sorry for double posting but I can't find the edit button, I'd like to say what you guys are saying makes great sense, I just dont see how it applys when you have two truckers in the same truck, do they have to both do PTI and ATI at beggining and end of each shifts?

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar
Also I read in my Georgia CDL manual that 15 minutes has to be taken to do the pre-trip inspection so that it shows on records I have done it? So when people look back on my log I guess they can see I took 15 minutes out of my 14hrs to do the pre-trip-inspection? I'm confused a bout that part greatly, because why can't I check my load (PTI) then start my clock?...

You actually, physically need to do your pre-trip. It is a On Duty Not Driving activity. DOT inspectors want to see that. It's not a waste of time. Yes, you take 15 minutes out of your life, every day you drive, to do that. Here's a link to my TT topic that's my touch-stone for always doing a pre-trip: Why do a pre-trip?

I bet i'm going to annoy a bunch of people with my rookie questions.

Jeez Ezcore! That's what the forum is all about! Ask away!

And, as an added attraction:

Sorry for double posting but I can't find the edit button,

When you reply to a post, look at the bottom of the text field, there's three buttons: Preview, Submit, and Notify Me Of New Comments. Use the Preview button to take a look to see if smilies are there, you can see photos, etc. Re-read your post again, checking the spelling and the reading-flow (so it sounds good to others.) If it looks good, hit Submit.

If you want to see answers in your email inbox, select the Notify Me button.

Pre-trip Inspection:

A pre-trip inspection is a thorough inspection of the truck completed before driving for the first time each day.

Federal and state laws require that drivers inspect their vehicles. Federal and state inspectors also may inspect your vehicles. If they judge a vehicle to be unsafe, they will put it “out of service” until it is repaired.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

BMI:

Body mass index (BMI)

BMI is a formula that uses weight and height to estimate body fat. For most people, BMI provides a reasonable estimate of body fat. The BMI's biggest weakness is that it doesn't consider individual factors such as bone or muscle mass. BMI may:

  • Underestimate body fat for older adults or other people with low muscle mass
  • Overestimate body fat for people who are very muscular and physically fit

It's quite common, especially for men, to fall into the "overweight" category if you happen to be stronger than average. If you're pretty strong but in good shape then pay no attention.

James B.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks for the replys guys!

Also I read in my Georgia CDL manual that 15 minutes has to be taken to do the pre-trip inspection so that it shows on records I have done it? So when people look back on my log I guess they can see I took 15 minutes out of my 14hrs to do the pre-trip-inspection? I'm confused a bout that part greatly, because why can't I check my load (PTI) then start my clock?...

I bet i'm going to annoy a bunch of people with my rookie questions.

Also i'd like to add again that i'm going to be team trucking for CRST hopfully (Thats the plan at least for the first year of my trucking career till I can get a flatbed company).

I'm heading too crst on the 28th of next month, I also live in Ga in Ringgold. I have my cdl-b so I got a good bit of knowledge with the pre trip and post trip. I would say do it for safety. Better safe than sorry

Pre-trip Inspection:

A pre-trip inspection is a thorough inspection of the truck completed before driving for the first time each day.

Federal and state laws require that drivers inspect their vehicles. Federal and state inspectors also may inspect your vehicles. If they judge a vehicle to be unsafe, they will put it “out of service” until it is repaired.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Jay R. R2-Detour 's Comment
member avatar

My trainer set his time to on duty not driving and sat in the truck for 15 mins....

I figure if I'm gonna set myself on the computer I may as well actually do the inspection. Why sit there and do nothing?

Ezcore's Comment
member avatar

Awesome thanks big time man, you guys are a friendly bunch of this website!

Oh ok, so regardless if we are team trucking, we always have to do this inspection, to make sure we do not endanger ourselves or others going down the road even if my teamate turn to drive he has to do the PTI. I got it now :) .

James B.'s Comment
member avatar

Awesome thanks big time man, you guys are a friendly bunch of this website!

Oh ok, so regardless if we are team trucking, we always have to do this inspection, to make sure we do not endanger ourselves or others going down the road even if my teamate turn to drive he has to do the PTI. I got it now :) .

I'm going to Iowa to there company school. What date are you heading up there? I may see you. I noticed some of the info about there school on here may be out dated. Like they have there own school now. It cost nothing up front. They also provide meals ( Breakfast and lunch monday-friday) as well as a $40.00 meal stipend. I can forward someone the details if the need it for an updated.

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More