Trainers?

Topic 10046 | Page 1

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Marcus R.'s Comment
member avatar

I see a lot of post about what company to drive for, but not a lot about trainers. I would like to know is there a ton of bad trainers or have I had bad luck?

Instance #1: I go out with a trainer for 2 of my 4 weeks. I was sexually harassed for not having teeth and being told I was going to be sucking his (member) and all people from my area have no teeth cause they are always (censored) their brothers and sisters. Was told not to Get out and look if I had issues with backing. Was told not to touch 'his mirrors or seat adjustments', having my drink thrown at me for it being in the wrong cup holder when I was driving, having to try and sleep while truck is moving, during day, in harness on top bunk. Asked questions that were answered with "I dont care" as all he would do was play on his laptop or on his iphone all the time.

I asked for a new trainer after 2 weeks and got in this situation.

Instance #2: I go out for 2 more weeks, was told to speed the whole time, at 70+ MPH (cause he had manipulated the govern) Guy spent day and night on phone with g/f fighting and having temper tantrums where he would stop the truck and get out for 4hrs at a time. Constantly threatening to drive truck through the main terminal and kill his dispatcher if she didn't give him the routes he wanted (At 1 point he sat at a rest stop for 4 days refusing loads) Was constantly being reminded how many people he has killed in the past, he has been in prison, that he has a gun in the truck and will shoot me if I make too much noise at night. We witnessed a woman get decapitated in FL. as she was texting and driving over speed limit in a residential area and went under the truck in front of us. He had a panic attack and was bonkers for the next 3 days. (This was not good for a new driver to see or how a veteran driver handles situations) Was told to (censored) run over dumb(censored) if they get in my safe area in front of the truck, that we dont have time to mess around. Or else I would get shot. The last 3 days were spent running non stop with no sleep, scared to try and sleep and in the hostile environment was nearly impossible to try. I asked to get off, was taken into managers office and asked what happened. I reported all things and they found to be true, was then asked to think of it as comradery and look the other way. I left the company after that.

My question stands, is this the normal atmosphere and behaviors, is this why the industry has such a high turnover ratio?

I want to drive, I love to drive...Graduated easy with my CDL A. but with 3 months it is very hard to find a company.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

So .... Satan and his minions have started training drivers!

If I take your post at face value, my suggestion, Marcus, is to get to a phone (at a truck stop, out of hearing of your trainer) and speak directly with your Fleet Manager. Read what you have posted here, and see what he/she says. Carrying a gun on a truck, I believe, is illegal. So is driving over other people and their cars.

People have posted about 'bad" mentors, and some trainees have even posted about the "good" ones! Sadly, I believe that most companies do not really train mentors how to be mentors, they just have a meeting one day, show them how to fill out forms, and get them a trainee. Also, sadly, many Owner Operators take on trainees because it's free labor for them and helps with the bottom line (making money).

Make that call.

Owner Operator:

An owner-operator is a driver who either owns or leases the truck they are driving. A self-employed driver.

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Unfortunately there is no shortage of stories about bad trainers in this industry. And a big part of that reason, as Errol pointed out, is that many of the trainers aren't interested in training anyone. They're lease drivers or owner operators looking for cheap labor is what it amounts to. So having the student onboard in their eyes is a necessary evil used to keep their business afloat.

Now one of the things you have to do is be 100% accurate with what you're reporting:

I reported all things and they found to be true, was then asked to think of it as comradery and look the other way

So you told management that the second trainer had a gun in the truck and that he told you to run people over or he would shoot you. Management believed you but laughed it off and called it comradery? I'm not buying it. Either he didn't actually have a gun or they didn't believe you. But nobody is going to laugh that off and call it comradery.

I guess since you already quit the company there isn't much we can do expect encourage you to find another company and get back out there. Obviously if you get stuck with another nutcase you should speak with the company about it immediately.

But I do know for a fact that there are a lot of bad trainers out there unfortunately. I don't doubt that at all. The situation is a lousy one but I really don't know what you can do other than give it another go and keep your fingers crossed. Report any trainer that's not handling things properly. Survive the training and go solo and then you won't have to worry about it anymore.

Owner Operator:

An owner-operator is a driver who either owns or leases the truck they are driving. A self-employed driver.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Errol missed this part:

I reported all things and they found to be true, was then asked to think of it as comradery and look the other way. I left the company after that.

Buddies can do almost anything and call it "fun". Remember the "game" where old people crossing the street were 10 points, and parked cars were 5 points? That's silly fun. But if you are going to believe the gun stuff and told to actually roll over people, it's not fun/camaraderie/goofing off or anything but it is serious.

So now you are out of that fire pit. Best of luck on your next company.

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