Swift

Topic 10484 | Page 1

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Rick Dees's Comment
member avatar

At this point, I keep changing my mind, how long do you have to go OTR as a rookie before you can get some type of dedicated account with this company. The reason I am asking is because Swifts has a Wal Mart DC about 10 miles from my house that they service. I would enjoy OTR for a while but would like to eventually get something more regional or dedicated. Does anyone know about the new Swift Training School in Memphis..any insights? I see a lot of Swift bashing on other sites but I have a friend thats been with them almost a year and seems to be ok happy there. Thanks.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

's Comment
member avatar

Hi, My husband's out there. They started out at training in Tennessee. We're in Fla. He said it was very good. Just stay away from the negative ninnies that don't know what they are talking about. Find some serious guys and stick with them. Encourage each other because it is hard. Then they brought him back and taught him to drive in Ocala, Fl. Which he says was an excellent experience for him. It was hard, no doubt about it. He got his Class A Saturday and we find out about his mentor today. Our biggest problem was delays. A 2 week delay (home) after Tenn. , another 2 week delay after hitting a curb on his first test. (Ya, watch that left side too) And now maybe another delay for a mentor. Solution: Make sure you have enough $$ to hold you up to any delays. He says Swift has everything you need and more. Read what the guys tell you here. And don't take the phrase " boot camp" lightly. And we're both 60 years old. I'm next. Just one of the guys

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

At this point, I keep changing my mind, how long do you have to go OTR as a rookie before you can get some type of dedicated account with this company. The reason I am asking is because Swifts has a Wal Mart DC about 10 miles from my house that they service. I would enjoy OTR for a while but would like to eventually get something more regional or dedicated. Does anyone know about the new Swift Training School in Memphis..any insights? I see a lot of Swift bashing on other sites but I have a friend thats been with them almost a year and seems to be ok happy there. Thanks.

"Swift Bashing" - big companies make easy targets. That's all. I have worked for Swift since February, after completing their school (the Memphis school is not new - the location next to the terminal is brand spankin' new.) No complaints.

Any trucking company will place you, as they need to, when they need to, to fill their load requirements

Generally, it's OTR for a few months. Then you can ask, or they will ask you, if you want a particular assignment. After 4 months OTR, I was asked If I wanted to do a shuttle run - 2500 miles/week and home every night (which I snapped up). When they needed another driver for the same run, they asked a few people who had just finished their mentoring meaning they never went OTR (except for their training).

After you drive OTR for a few weeks, let your DM know what you are looking for.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar
double-quotes-start.png

At this point, I keep changing my mind, how long do you have to go OTR as a rookie before you can get some type of dedicated account with this company. The reason I am asking is because Swifts has a Wal Mart DC about 10 miles from my house that they service. I would enjoy OTR for a while but would like to eventually get something more regional or dedicated. Does anyone know about the new Swift Training School in Memphis..any insights? I see a lot of Swift bashing on other sites but I have a friend thats been with them almost a year and seems to be ok happy there. Thanks.

double-quotes-end.png

"Swift Bashing" - big companies make easy targets. That's all. I have worked for Swift since February, after completing their school (the Memphis school is not new - the location next to the terminal is brand spankin' new.) No complaints.

Any trucking company will place you, as they need to, when they need to, to fill their load requirements

Generally, it's OTR for a few months. Then you can ask, or they will ask you, if you want a particular assignment. After 4 months OTR, I was asked If I wanted to do a shuttle run - 2500 miles/week and home every night (which I snapped up). When they needed another driver for the same run, they asked a few people who had just finished their mentoring meaning they never went OTR (except for their training).

After you drive OTR for a few weeks, let your DM know what you are looking for.

I was OTR with Swift for 4 months before I was assigned to the Walmart Dedicated account. Like Errol, I have nothing but good things to say about Swift.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Shaun S.'s Comment
member avatar
double-quotes-start.png

At this point, I keep changing my mind, how long do you have to go OTR as a rookie before you can get some type of dedicated account with this company. The reason I am asking is because Swifts has a Wal Mart DC about 10 miles from my house that they service. I would enjoy OTR for a while but would like to eventually get something more regional or dedicated. Does anyone know about the new Swift Training School in Memphis..any insights? I see a lot of Swift bashing on other sites but I have a friend thats been with them almost a year and seems to be ok happy there. Thanks.

double-quotes-end.png

"Swift Bashing" - big companies make easy targets. That's all. I have worked for Swift since February, after completing their school (the Memphis school is not new - the location next to the terminal is brand spankin' new.) No complaints.

Any trucking company will place you, as they need to, when they need to, to fill their load requirements

Generally, it's OTR for a few months. Then you can ask, or they will ask you, if you want a particular assignment. After 4 months OTR, I was asked If I wanted to do a shuttle run - 2500 miles/week and home every night (which I snapped up). When they needed another driver for the same run, they asked a few people who had just finished their mentoring meaning they never went OTR (except for their training).

After you drive OTR for a few weeks, let your DM know what you are looking for.

This is what makes me think Swift is the way to go, I do not mind going OTR for the experience but want some other options as I would like to be home atleast weekly at some point.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Shaun is hoping for:

This is what makes me think Swift is the way to go, I do not mind going OTR for the experience but want some other options as I would like to be home at least weekly at some point.

Swift (and other companies) have dedicated accounts where you get home every week. My mentor did this - I got a two day hotel stay every Friday! My mentor even recommended to the DM that I join the Georgia Pacific account, but no, it was OTR first.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Rick Dees's Comment
member avatar

Thanks yall for the advice, I think I will be going with Swift...looks like January 2016. Looking forward to it, if there are delays in training thats fine, got a pension that will be coming in upon retirement soon.

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