Job Corps...

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Cory W.'s Comment
member avatar

So I'm about to my last resort trucking is something I actually would love to do I know it aint easy but anything worth it isn't easy. I've read some horror stories and honestly I'm uneducated in this area with a confusion of terms as to say... Training vs School I see some say they offer paid training but it seems they are using the term interchangeably.

I am willing to relocate to anywhere and apply for my CDL permit there but I need a "school" a place that trains me for the state CDL exam and will let me use one of their trucks for my state exam, my problem is I'm low income I literally living off my social security survivors benefits I have bad credit I've tried my bank for personal loans they said no so I'm thinking about Job Corp but have read some horror stories about people not getting jobs I'm to willing to even work for swift for a year or so to get some "reputation" a way to show I'm a competent driver and all I'm just feeling unsure and trapped about the whole schooling thing.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

So I'm about to my last resort trucking is something I actually would love to do I know it aint easy but anything worth it isn't easy. I've read some horror stories and honestly I'm uneducated in this area with a confusion of terms as to say... Training vs School I see some say they offer paid training but it seems they are using the term interchangeably.

I am willing to relocate to anywhere and apply for my CDL permit there but I need a "school" a place that trains me for the state CDL exam and will let me use one of their trucks for my state exam, my problem is I'm low income I literally living off my social security survivors benefits I have bad credit I've tried my bank for personal loans they said no so I'm thinking about Job Corp but have read some horror stories about people not getting jobs I'm to willing to even work for swift for a year or so to get some "reputation" a way to show I'm a competent driver and all I'm just feeling unsure and trapped about the whole schooling thing.

Cory, "horror stories" are more entertaining than "Cool stories". Consider Horror stories to be entertainment. Usually the writer couldn't cut it at a company or school, and far be it for them to blame themselves for anything!

You probably don't need to relocate for either school or work. Most companies (not private schools) will get you to their company school and put you in a hotel (don't expect the Hilton, though!). As for permanent work location, the great thing about trucking is you can pretty much live anywhere. When you put in for home time, the company will send you a load that goes near your home, and then get you a load to pickup nearby, after your break. (This is not a guarantee, but generally how things go.)

To straighten out "paid training": There is Schooling and then there's Training. School is where you learn how to drive a truck, and work to pass the CDL Skills test. Training will happen after you are hired, and you are on the road with an instructor.

An example is Swift's ads (I work for Swift). [This just in: Swift has clarified their ad copy] Well, they used to more or less say "We offer school and paid training", implying you get paid for school. Now it's clear:

SWIFT is a Trucking Company that will train you, mentor you (with paid truck driving training once you graduate with a Class-A CDL License),

Some companies do pay you during school. But by then you already have a training tuition contract.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Bart's Comment
member avatar

Welcome to the forum Cory. I apologize to everyone on here that about the only time I post is when someone takes a dig around Swift but it gets in my craw and makes things hard to leave alone. Cory I have worked for Swift going on 2 yrs now and have had nothing but a great employment experience. I did not take their training but got my schooling thru WIA. I chose Swift after sitting at our local truck stop and seeing who had the most freight coming thru my small town in western Colorado. Hands down it was Swift. That told me they could probably get me home when I needed to be there. They do. I wasn't aware of the reputation they had on the road, didn't care then don't care now. Swift gives me a great truck and all the miles I can handle. In my FIRST year I made +- 40,000. I am on track for $50,000 this year if not better. You will hear the Veterans on here say don't listen to the negative crap you get on some of the other forums out there and they are correct. These mega-companies are MEGA for a reason. They know how to get and move freight. Which is good for us drivers. My first year was OTR then I was fortunate enough to get offered a spot on a dedicated route. It had a lesser CPM but I get to go home for my 34 hr reset and occasionally I will stop by home just to do my 10 hr break. Also I get extra stop pay (5 or 6 stops a day sometimes) plus short haul pay on the local runs and a quarterly bonus on miles I run. I run out of a small terminal at Walmart DC in northern Utah that has really nice facilities for us and terrific people to work with. We cover the Seattle area Boise Id. Up I to northern Montana over to New Mexico all over Utah, Las Vegas and occasionally down to So. Cal. For produce backhauls. These are some of the most beautiful areas of our country. So, if "you would even be willing to work for Swift" I reply you would be lucky if they were willing to let you work for them.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dedicated Route:

A driver or carrier who transports cargo between regular, prescribed routes. Normally it means a driver will be dedicated to working for one particular customer like Walmart or Home Depot and they will only haul freight for that customer. You'll often hear drivers say something like, "I'm on the Walmart dedicated account."

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Dennis R. (Greatest Drive's Comment
member avatar

Its easier to go to a company sponsored training program,in your home state. If you have a relative,in another state,where youd like to attend school...this would also work. Celadon pays for absolutely everything,not one penny is needed for food,lodging, classroom supplies,permits,etc. Banking some cash,and saving it for supplies,once on the road,would be a smart idea.Good Luck.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

Cory W.'s Comment
member avatar

Welcome to the forum Cory. I apologize to everyone on here that about the only time I post is when someone takes a dig around Swift but it gets in my craw and makes things hard to leave alone. Cory I have worked for Swift going on 2 yrs now and have had nothing but a great employment experience. I did not take their training but got my schooling thru WIA. I chose Swift after sitting at our local truck stop and seeing who had the most freight coming thru my small town in western Colorado. Hands down it was Swift. That told me they could probably get me home when I needed to be there. They do. I wasn't aware of the reputation they had on the road, didn't care then don't care now. Swift gives me a great truck and all the miles I can handle. In my FIRST year I made +- 40,000. I am on track for $50,000 this year if not better. You will hear the Veterans on here say don't listen to the negative crap you get on some of the other forums out there and they are correct. These mega-companies are MEGA for a reason. They know how to get and move freight. Which is good for us drivers. My first year was OTR then I was fortunate enough to get offered a spot on a dedicated route. It had a lesser CPM but I get to go home for my 34 hr reset and occasionally I will stop by home just to do my 10 hr break. Also I get extra stop pay (5 or 6 stops a day sometimes) plus short haul pay on the local runs and a quarterly bonus on miles I run. I run out of a small terminal at Walmart DC in northern Utah that has really nice facilities for us and terrific people to work with. We cover the Seattle area Boise Id. Up I to northern Montana over to New Mexico all over Utah, Las Vegas and occasionally down to So. Cal. For produce backhauls. These are some of the most beautiful areas of our country. So, if "you would even be willing to work for Swift" I reply you would be lucky if they were willing to let you work for them.

Not trying to offend your outfit, my mom O/O was hit by a swift truck new/trainer driver team even her insurance said "we've got this" just raised that way I'll still say their nicer then C.R England in driver support (just averaging the review). I'm glad you've had a nice experience with Swift if I have to I pray I will too I'm just concerned&read as one of the biggest companies they'll hire any first year and their managers aren't personal.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dedicated Route:

A driver or carrier who transports cargo between regular, prescribed routes. Normally it means a driver will be dedicated to working for one particular customer like Walmart or Home Depot and they will only haul freight for that customer. You'll often hear drivers say something like, "I'm on the Walmart dedicated account."

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

literally living off my social security survivors benefits.

I'm not sure how old you are, Cory. You can get a CDL at 18 if you've had a drivers license for 2 yrs, but would be restricted to intrastate driving until you are 21.

That intrastate restriction would probably make you ineligible for a company sponsored school at this time. I'm not exactly sure though.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Intrastate:

The act of purchasers and sellers transacting business while keeping all transactions in a single state, without crossing state lines to do so.

Cory W.'s Comment
member avatar

Its easier to go to a company sponsored training program,in your home state. If you have a relative,in another state,where youd like to attend school...this would also work. Celadon pays for absolutely everything,not one penny is needed for food,lodging, classroom supplies,permits,etc. Banking some cash,and saving it for supplies,once on the road,would be a smart idea.Good Luck.

does Celadon also cover CDL permit students?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

Cory W.'s Comment
member avatar
double-quotes-start.png

literally living off my social security survivors benefits.

double-quotes-end.png

I'm not sure how old you are, Cory. You can get a CDL at 18 if you've had a drivers license for 2 yrs, but would be restricted to intrastate driving until you are 21.

That intrastate restriction would probably make you ineligible for a company sponsored school at this time. I'm not exactly sure though.

Sorry I wasn't specific I am 22.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Intrastate:

The act of purchasers and sellers transacting business while keeping all transactions in a single state, without crossing state lines to do so.

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

So you are good on age, the survivors benefits thing threw me as they typically end at 18 or 19... unless you are in college or disabled. Now what you need to do is apply to every company school who hires out of your state and see what sticks.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Cory sips the Kool-Aid:

read [Swift] as one of the biggest companies they'll hire any first year and their managers aren't personal.

Yes, they hired me, so I can't complain there. Swift will not hire just "any" first year student. All companies have standards, and some are tighter than others. I had a "over 15" speeding ticket last July, 2014, first violation in "forever". Knight said come back in a year, Swift said, "How about December 2?"

As for office people and shops, at least at the terminals I visited in New Boston, MI, Lancaster, TX, Edwardsville, KS, and my base, Memphis, TN, are all friendly and have a moment to talk. I wanted to chat (on a particular topic) with my Memphis Fleet Manager. We sat in a closed-door office for about 45 minutes. We're still friends.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

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