Maps Or GPS?

Topic 10628 | Page 1

Page 1 of 1
The Little Trucker's Comment
member avatar

I know most truckers will tell you that you should use a map like a Rand McNally to drive your routes, but now I'm hearing new things. For instance, there are some Youtube truckers that tell you there are truck GPS's that you can buy and put in that you are driving a truck and it will take you on routes that are okay for trucks, i.e. high enough bridges, etc. These GPS's supposedly also have live alerts for bad traffic areas, etc. I tried looking into the one that Allie Knight (a female trucker who Youtubes her life as a trucker and gives trucking advice) recommends, but it is kind of pricey in my opinion (379 on Amazon). On top of that, does it really work? Do you guys recommend investing in a trucking GPS or should I just stick to a Rand McNally? If this really is worth the investment, should I invest in it before or after training?

Michael C.'s Comment
member avatar

Rand Mcnally has a lot of different options for GPS's, they have standard car, RV, and truck GPS's. I'm planning on buying one of them as I've heard 90% positive about RM GPS's. But on the same token I will also have a hard copy of maps to help for routing. As far as the price goes I generally go with "you get what you pay for", if I'm going to entrust a piece of equipment to guide me I'd rather spend the extra to get as good a quality as I can get, but at the same time have backup plans in case it goes down.

Just my 2 cents.

The Little Trucker's Comment
member avatar

Rand Mcnally has a lot of different options for GPS's, they have standard car, RV, and truck GPS's. I'm planning on buying one of them as I've heard 90% positive about RM GPS's. But on the same token I will also have a hard copy of maps to help for routing. As far as the price goes I generally go with "you get what you pay for", if I'm going to entrust a piece of equipment to guide me I'd rather spend the extra to get as good a quality as I can get, but at the same time have backup plans in case it goes down.

Just my 2 cents.

Thanks I'll definitely look into it.

Robert B. (The Dragon) ye's Comment
member avatar

Always always always have an Atlas. GPS is a tool and isn't always accurate. Plus, what if you get somewhere that your gps isn't working or it just quits working? Now the one thing you've been relying on completely isn't there and you're potentially lost. Me personally. I use a few different things, one as a backup for the other. First, I use my atlas (laminated type) and mark my route. I also make quick notes on a post it note for the local directions. Then I'll put my destination in the gps which I'll use for live traffic updates (nice feature btw) and then I'll also put the address in Google Earth to give me a good look at where I'm going. It not only shows the building, it can help me see where the truck entrance is since the address might be different from the driver entrance. That view will also give me a good idea of places to park in case I decide to shut down there to save from starting my clock in the morning.

Nick's Comment
member avatar

I always use the atlas when trip planning. Our Qualcomm has GPS and it works pretty well honestly, hasn't gotten me in trouble YET, knock on wood. Those rms are niceee just too spendy for me. My trainer had one and I never seen him touch the atlas.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Keys man's Comment
member avatar

I use trip planner by rand with an atlas to lay out the route I want all the way to the customer and then import that into my rand 530. That way my GPS gives me the exact route I want to take

Travis T.'s Comment
member avatar

Never Never Never solely rely on a GPS, always correlate that to an Atlas and i also use Google maps to find the correct entrance to a customer. GPS can and will lead you into a field or down a street to a cauldesac or somewhere else not accesible for trucks. Now if we're talking Interstate then by all means GPS is awesome. I use the newest Rand Mcnally (whatever model number it is) and I will say it works decent. BUT it has tried to take me a few places where there is specifically a sign that says "No Trucks Allowed" especially in the North East, things are all wacky up there.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

The Little Trucker's Comment
member avatar

Never Never Never solely rely on a GPS, always correlate that to an Atlas and i also use Google maps to find the correct entrance to a customer. GPS can and will lead you into a field or down a street to a cauldesac or somewhere else not accesible for trucks. Now if we're talking Interstate then by all means GPS is awesome. I use the newest Rand Mcnally (whatever model number it is) and I will say it works decent. BUT it has tried to take me a few places where there is specifically a sign that says "No Trucks Allowed" especially in the North East, things are all wacky up there.

Do you ever just take the route that is sent to you on the Qualcomm?

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Travis T.'s Comment
member avatar

No, altough 90% of the time that route would work fine there are all kinds of things that change before technology can keep up. My company has never said anything about not exactly following their route but i dont go 50 miles out of the way either haha. At the end of the day its your career and if you get in an accident you're responsible and not only will you be paying the ticket but if serious enough your career could be over. Try to get another job driving after you run into a low bridge, it hasn't happened to me but i'm sure it wouldn't be easy lol

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

No, altough 90% of the time that route would work fine there are all kinds of things that change before technology can keep up. My company has never said anything about not exactly following their route but i dont go 50 miles out of the way either haha. At the end of the day its your career and if you get in an accident you're responsible and not only will you be paying the ticket but if serious enough your career could be over. Try to get another job driving after you run into a low bridge, it hasn't happened to me but i'm sure it wouldn't be easy lol

My company has come out and stated not to follow the Qualcomm/Navi-Go system "blindly". That's great advice for any driver.

Since I am a dedicated driver I know most of my routes without relying on the Qualcomm or other GPS toll. There are times though when my "stop routing" dictates using roads that I am not as familiar with. In that case I always check my route using Rand McNally's truckers atlas, just to be sure. In some of the more rural areas of my territory I have changed the route suggested by the Qualcomm after checking with the atlas. I can only share my personal experience, but my trips are always pre-planned in advance, so I know a head of time what the route(s) is and if I need to do some extra homework to stay out of trouble. I use a yellow post-it with hand-written route directions as a back-up.

The other issue with relying solely on the GPS devices is that they will sometimes lose their satellite feed, or in the middle of the night shut-down for a software update or other issues. Without a back-up plan, you run the risk of flying blind for a prolonged period of time.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Page 1 of 1

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More