Failed A Level II Inspection

Topic 10709 | Page 1

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Dave D. (Armyman)'s Comment
member avatar

No ____, there I was, driving across a bridge from Brownsville, Nebraska, into Missouri, and there at the bottom of the bridge was the Missouri Highway Patrol/DOT waiting for me, to do a Level II walk around. Tail lights on the tractor (bobtail) were out. I had a trailer, so I didn't get a ticket.

Dave

Bobtail:

"Bobtailing" means you are driving a tractor without a trailer attached.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Ernie S. (AKA Old Salty D's Comment
member avatar

No ____, there I was, driving across a bridge from Brownsville, Nebraska, into Missouri, and there at the bottom of the bridge was the Missouri Highway Patrol/DOT waiting for me, to do a Level II walk around. Tail lights on the tractor (bobtail) were out. I had a trailer, so I didn't get a ticket.

Dave

Were they working earlier when you did your pre-trip inspection? If they were not, then shame on you for driving a defective vehicle knowingly.......

All kidding aside, really, did you do your pre-trip? I do one every morning before I leave out. Does not matter if everything was working yesterday, I still do my pre-trip before I leave.

Ernie

Pre-trip Inspection:

A pre-trip inspection is a thorough inspection of the truck completed before driving for the first time each day.

Federal and state laws require that drivers inspect their vehicles. Federal and state inspectors also may inspect your vehicles. If they judge a vehicle to be unsafe, they will put it “out of service” until it is repaired.

Bobtail:

"Bobtailing" means you are driving a tractor without a trailer attached.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Dave D. (Armyman)'s Comment
member avatar

I did a pre-trip, but that one is kind of easy to miss, since I was hooked to a trailer. I was more concerned with my trailer lights. I think the DOT officer was just looking for something to ding me with, and he wasn't going to stop until he found it.

I was lucky. He asked to see my Bills of Lading, and with out thinking, I just handed it to the officer. I was OVERWEIGHT by around 300 pounds.

He could have dinged me for that, but didn't.

Dave

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Anchorman's Comment
member avatar

Just a helpful tip for anyone watching...A good practice is to always verify the locking jaws are properly secure around the kingpin. While you are down there, you will be right in front of the tail lights on the tractor. Make sure to check these during the process. Doing these two things will help prevent other, potentially serious, issues in the future.

Hudsonhawk's Comment
member avatar

Just a helpful tip for anyone watching...A good practice is to always verify the locking jaws are properly secure around the kingpin. While you are down there, you will be right in front of the tail lights on the tractor. Make sure to check these during the process. Doing these two things will help prevent other, potentially serious, issues in the future.

Like a **** at a truck stop pulling your release handle. There's some real bad apples out here.

Dave D. (Armyman)'s Comment
member avatar

Like a **** at a truck stop pulling your release handle. There's some real bad apples out here.

I've heard of that happening.

Dave

Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Like a **** at a truck stop pulling your release handle. There's some real bad apples out here.

double-quotes-end.png

I've heard of that happening.

Dave

Yet you still didnt and/or dont check the rear of your tractor. If you missed the entire panel of tail lights then you most definitely didn't check the locking jaws.

embarrassed.gif

Paul C., Rubber Duckey's Comment
member avatar

Umm pretrip 101 check all lights, fluids, belts, connections (electrical&air), tires, wipers, glass and mirrors.

Now if u are running through Utah make sure and check your DOT bumper for loose bolts. Personal experience...

embarrassed.gif

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Pat M.'s Comment
member avatar

Hey it happens. I see that many do perfect pretrips. Heck, I missed a leaking axle seal once but the mechanic caught it because he was fixing something else. You all can not tell me that you crawl under the trailer and truck to check every crossmember and the throw of the brakes to make sure they are not out of adjustment or that your s-cam bushings are not worn out. Not gonna happen. Yeah the tail lights are more obvious but I can check the jaws of the 5th wheel and not even look down at the tail lights. When I see them is when I am at the back of the trailer checking those lights and then walking back to the tractor.

Dave, while I agree with not needing them while hooked to a trailer, they have to be working in case you need to drop the trailer for whatever reason and you have to bobtail home etc. I am like you, I am very rarely NOT hooked to a trailer. Heck tomorrow the feds are inspecting some of our trucks and are even going to give us a class on securement.

Bobtail:

"Bobtailing" means you are driving a tractor without a trailer attached.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Dave D. (Armyman)'s Comment
member avatar

Here's the thing. The tractor lights work, when I throw on my four-way lights. The brake lights work, I think. They just are not on, when my lights are on.

Soooo, when I did my checks, I probably thought I was good, when I wasn't.

The turn signals work also.

Dave

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