Why Didn't He Get Paid?

Topic 11093 | Page 1

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CMFH's Comment
member avatar

My husband and I just opened his pay stub from last week and he only got pay from one trip and we are trying to figure out why they shorted him? We did 4 loads last week, about 3000 miles total but he was only paid for 600. The load he was paid for he didn't have to turn his bol in to get paid. The other loads, with bols, which he did turn in, he has no pay. His check was literally 240 before taxes. 70 after. He's still pretty new to this and I was wondering if anyone knew of any reason he wouldn't get paid? Also, his paperwork has to be turned in by tuesday, he used transflo on his phone and had it in on Sunday.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

CMFH, this can be resolved fairly easily by making a simple phone call to the payroll department and asking them what happened. I suspect that he may have not done something right with the phone app., but I could be way off base. It sounds to me like payroll didn't see the paperwork so the loads didn't get paid. Call them first thing tomorrow and follow up on it.

I send in all my paperwork via the smart phone, but I have never had a problem. You may also want to check with your DM about it, but I think you can get it resolved quickly and easily with a courteous call to the payroll department.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Michael S.'s Comment
member avatar

To add to what OS has said. Mistakes were made. Mistakes can still be made, so mistakes will continue to be made. Yes, payroll departments try to minimize mistakes as much as possible. There's nothing that can sink a business faster than screwing up payables or receivables, so it's a field that recruits and develops detail people. Alas, they're people and they sometimes make mistakes. Additionally, since your spouse had to forward his paperwork it's possible that he made a mistake. Possibly something along the lines of posting his BOLs but not finalizing them. Payroll makes mistakes in any field not just trucking.

Given that no driver has the same pay as any other, the chance for errors is higher. A courteous call is the best way to handle it. If he has his BOLs this can be easily worked out. Courtesy works better than anger, and there is the possibility that one day he may mess up, now how will payroll handle it if they remember him being rude?

I once changed my pay to have $75 transferred automatically to my company sponsored credit union savings. Instead the clerk made an error and completed my pay adjustment to transfer 75% of my pay to savings. Once taxes and my other deductions, and the 75% of gross were removed I was paid something under $10 (I think it was $3.35). I went right to the payroll department and said, "I have something to show you." They took one look at my pay stub and knew what was wrong immediately. We had a good laugh over it, and they cut me a check that day for the correct balance, and put in a reversal of the transfer to the credit union. Mistakes happen anywhere there are people, but in this case no one did anything malicious and no one's feelings were hurt with accusations.

Geoff M.'s Comment
member avatar

I am leaving for training this weekend and just browsing the forums when I came across this post and the wonderful replies. I gotta say, it's a breath of fresh air to hear people give kind, well thought out, clear headed answers to questions such as this. People these days are too quick to get mad and want to point the finger at someone when the need to do so does not exist. Kudos to Old School and Michael S, nicely answered!

Michael S.'s Comment
member avatar

D'oh, I should have mentioned that had I made an error and ticked 75% myself then the payroll people would still have done the reversals that day, if and only if, I was courteous about it. Had I gone in guns blazing, and it was my error, I'm sure the answer would have been something like

Fill in this form. The deduction will be set correctly in your next pay. Oh, if you want those funds, you better go talk to the credit union officer.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
CMFH's Comment
member avatar

Thanks for the responses guys! Though he was furious, he didn't wanna be mad at them. We figured it was something he did, just wanted to see if yall had run into a problem like that in the past. Turns out his trainer neglected to explain any paper work to him and he's been trying to figure it out since he got on his own. Turns out, he hasn't gotten paid for half of his trips since he went solo, we just didn't realize it because of a couple of bonuses he's gotten. $70 check brings red flags. Lol but he called and figured it out. He's resubmitted the paper work, filled out and completely and correctly, and will get all the missed miles paid next week. It's mostly on his trainer. He was only worried about miles. He didn't teach him anything about all the things he would have to do when he went solo- paperwork, how to read and send macros, etc. It's been a messy few weeks

BMI:

Body mass index (BMI)

BMI is a formula that uses weight and height to estimate body fat. For most people, BMI provides a reasonable estimate of body fat. The BMI's biggest weakness is that it doesn't consider individual factors such as bone or muscle mass. BMI may:

  • Underestimate body fat for older adults or other people with low muscle mass
  • Overestimate body fat for people who are very muscular and physically fit

It's quite common, especially for men, to fall into the "overweight" category if you happen to be stronger than average. If you're pretty strong but in good shape then pay no attention.

Michael S.'s Comment
member avatar

Paperwork is really important. He should make time to visit his terminal and discuss with his DM , and anyone else there, how to do it the right way.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
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