Doubles & Triples???

Topic 11274 | Page 1

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Bad Bob's Comment
member avatar

Just a quick question and anyone who has experience with this please chime in. Is driving doubles and triples worth doing from an opportunities and making more money standpoint? Basically, are there very many opportunities to make bunches of more money hauling multiple trailers??? If it's not going to make much difference, I probably won't bother with that. Just let me know guys and gals. I always like to ask the people who should know.

Bad Bob

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

I suggest getting all of your endorsements at the time of testing, since you never know what opportunity might come up. You might think you'll never pull a tanker now, but maybe that will change? Point being is that you don't know the future, so you should put yourself in the best possible position to accept any opportunity that comes down the pike.

I got all my endorsements out of school, and didn't know if I'd need them until an opportunity came up for me. Glad I got them all. I'm a linehaul driver. My company requires doubles / triples, hazmat and tank endorsements.

In regard to money, yes, these endorsements will impact your earning potential. Linehaul drivers get paid some of the highest wages in trucking, and I couldn't be a linehaul driver without my endorsements, especially the hazmat.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

Dennis R. (Greatest Drive's Comment
member avatar

Doubles and triples,are usually line haul ,and get you home daily,and it pays more but..Im in no hurry to attempt wiggle wagons. Ive seen plenty of fatal wrecks,to realize,money is not my first priority out here.

Line Haul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

For the benefit of prospective drivers here, "wiggle wagons" are nothing to be feared. You can drive them safely. It's a matter of the driver learning how to pull doubles - i.e., it's a learned skill. You definitely need to watch "sawing the wheel" more than just pulling a van. For those who don't know, "sawing the wheel" is over-steering while just driving in a straight line. New drivers tend to do this. To combat this unnecessary reflex, just let the truck move a little as it wants to, like when you drive your personal vehicle. You don't have to counter steer each little bump on the road. I can keep a set of doubles in more of a straight line down the interstate than some knuckleheads that swerve around with a van.

New drivers with doubles tend to saw the wheel a little more than new drivers with vans, simply because you can feel that tail trailer sometimes sway a little. That's a natural movement. It's nothing to compensate for. It's the unnecessary compensating that brings on "sawing the wheel."

Pulling doubles takes a different skill set, but it's nothing to be feared. Same with a tanker. If you wanna pull a tank, but know about the surge, don't let the surge scare you into not pulling a tank.

There's something to be said for a new driver maybe starting with something a little "easier" like pulling a van (dry or reefer), but everybody is different, and some folks are more willing / able to start with a tank or a set of doubles. I just wanted to make sure any prospective drivers out there don't shy away from pulling a tank or doubles, if that's what they wanna do. As long as you're aware of the differences and potential risks, and have the necessary training, there is no reason not to start with doubles or tank, or no reason for an experienced driver to try to learn as well.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Dennis R. (Greatest Drive's Comment
member avatar

I can certainly see why most trucks are governed,I was driving through Bozeman Mt on Friday,conditions were snow and ice,temp was 27. Everyone blowing by me,like the roads were dry. A driver lost his life at mm 308. Was the load that important? What happens when doubles ,lose traction on ice? I dont want to find out.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

I can certainly see why most trucks are governed,I was driving through Bozeman Mt on Friday,conditions were snow and ice,temp was 27. Everyone blowing by me,like the roads were dry. A driver lost his life at mm 308. Was the load that important? What happens when doubles ,lose traction on ice? I dont want to find out.

What happens when any vehicle loses traction on ice?

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
As long as you're aware of the differences and potential risks, and have the necessary training, there is no reason not to start with doubles or tank

Since there are additional risks to pulling doubles/triples, tanker, or flatbed for that matter then I would say there is indeed a reason to shy away from those when you're brand new to trucking. I wouldn't say you absolutely should not try them straight out of school, but I certainly think it's something you should think through really well. Trucking is incredibly difficult as it is in the beginning without jumping into the more difficult and dangerous driving jobs.

If it were up to me I would pass a law that says no one with less than one year of OTR driving experience can pull anything other than a dry van or reefer. Obviously it isn't up to me, but I just think the risks are too high for a brand new driver to jump straight into one of those types of cargo.

When you're talking about very risky endeavors like trucking you have to think long term and make smart choices. Do you jump into the most difficult and dangerous jobs straight out of school? Would waiting to get one year of experience doing something a little safer really have a negative impact on your life long term? Because killing yourself or someone else certainly will.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

As long as you're aware of the differences and potential risks, and have the necessary training, there is no reason not to start with doubles or tank

double-quotes-end.png

Since there are additional risks to pulling doubles/triples, tanker, or flatbed for that matter then I would say there is indeed a reason to shy away from those when you're brand new to trucking. I wouldn't say you absolutely should not try them straight out of school, but I certainly think it's something you should think through really well. Trucking is incredibly difficult as it is in the beginning without jumping into the more difficult and dangerous driving jobs.

If it were up to me I would pass a law that says no one with less than one year of OTR driving experience can pull anything other than a dry van or reefer. Obviously it isn't up to me, but I just think the risks are too high for a brand new driver to jump straight into one of those types of cargo.

When you're talking about very risky endeavors like trucking you have to think long term and make smart choices. Do you jump into the most difficult and dangerous jobs straight out of school? Would waiting to get one year of experience doing something a little safer really have a negative impact on your life long term? Because killing yourself or someone else certainly will.

You have very good points, and I know your stance on the subject. Long term thinking is always a good thing.

My point is that there is no need to fear pulling doubles. Respect and fear are different animals.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Bad Bob's Comment
member avatar

Thanks for the information. Information is power. I will go ahead and get the proper endorsements for doubles & triples and tankers. I'm not really worried about the extra risk. Me and my wife used to drive swinging meat loads and all it was, was just making sure you definitely slow down on any turns. The meat can swing to the side and dump the trailer. I'm older now and drive more careful anyway so that's a plus with loads that can shift easily. Thanks again. Truckers Truth is an invaluable resource.

Bad Bob

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

G-Rod's Comment
member avatar

I'm trying to get my foot in the door of some doubles as a linehaul driver. For a shot at making a linehaulers salary, I'm up for the challenge.

How much does it really take though? I posted a post a while back about hitting animals where I saw a driver on I-70 in Kansas smash a deer and jerk the wheel at 60-65mph and managed to stay upright. And if my 10+ year old memory serves me right, I do believe it was doubles. The trailers did come up on two wheels though, and I thought he was going over, but didnt.

So are they really THAT touchy?

They seem to look fine driving down the highway. Not calling it "easy" by any means, just saying.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

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