Continental Truck Driving School In Lancaster Tx

Topic 1142 | Page 1

Page 1 of 4 Next Page Go To Page:
Mistelle's Comment
member avatar

Hi! Thought I would share what all is going on at this school. This isn't a bad review but this school isn't for someone who wants to take their time.

My husband and I both are wanting to be over the road team drivers. We decided on this route for our lives because we want to have money to buy a house. So we have a pretty strong incentive to get this rolling along.

We started making plans a month in advance. We got our recruiter to give us as much information as we could (the recruiter was from CRST). After some communication issues we got things sorted out and decided to start our schooling the first week in August.

We arrived on Sunday after riding a train, a bus and a cab (which CRST refunded me the money for, though it comes out of my first check). The motel isn't too bad but it's hard to get them to leave the ac on.

Monday at 6:45 they picked us up to go to class. The class is run by a wonderful man named Ray. He is funny and is a great teacher. Though to me, the school seemed a bit unorganized. They don't give me copies of anything without me throwing a fit it seems. I signed a lot of papers on the first day and so far, I have only received three pieces of paper back. I have been promised by the desk clerk that I will receive my copies when I graduate (though I made sure that it was before I leave before orientation, I won't receive my diploma until I complete my 8 months with CRST). The head of the school helped us by running us to Walmart so that we could buy some groceries. His name is Rod or Rob. Not too sure which it is.

Tuesday we studied a little bit and then headed off to the DPS to take the tests for special permits and combination. We studied really hard during class and then were up till late (around midnight) studying to pass the test. Both my husband and I passed the tests. After we got back, we went straight to our room and started to study for air brakes and pretrip. We invited some of the other students to our room to help them catch up with reviews of the precious tests and read the chapters aloud for the next two tests.

Wednesday we studied air brakes and pretrip in class for four or five hours, then we headed off to DPS to take the tests. Both my husband and I studied really hard and we passed. When we got back, we studied for general knowledge. We invited a friend from the classes to study with us (he has dyslexia and thus needed a little bit of help with the reading parts of it, he can read, just not very fast and this course is fast)

Thursday we studied general knowledge in class and then headed over to the dmv to take the tests. My husband and I passed again. We keep tying on score so we can't really say one is better than the other. A little competition between us to help keep us on our edge.

Friday we spent the day catching up on the class work. We finished it all and watched some videos. The class didn't feel rushed at all. Seemed to drag by today.

We have Saturday and Sunday off. So we are resting.

Monday we go back to school and will be heading out to the range. Wish us luck!

BTW, a quick note about CRST. One recruiter said we would have meals provided, at least two a day. I found out from the other recruiter that wasn't true. Of course, I wasn't told this until it was almost too late for us to make sure we have enough food. We are going to be struggling to make it through this.

The recruiter Stefani was really good. Unfortunately for us, she was promoted. So just today we got transferred over to a girl named Aaron (I don't know how to spell it)

We have lost two students already since the start of this class. One to quitting because he couldn't handle the stress and the other due to some issues with his application. We didn't ever find out what it was, and he was gone before we could ask.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Welcome aboard Mistelle and thanks for all that info!

I guess it's after the fact now, but life sure would have been 1000 times easier on you guys if you had gone through our High Road CDL Training Program before heading off to CRST. You would have been able to learn all of those materials from the comfort of your own home and had your permit in hand right away, basically allowing you to sleep through the entire first week while everyone else is trying to cram those materials down their throat day and night. But for anyone else reading this, make sure you go through our program before you start your official CDL training wherever that may be.

Now I have a question. You mentioned "Continental Truck Driving School" but you're going through CRST. Is CRST using a private truck driving school to train you guys? I was under the impression they have their own schools on their own property, but maybe that's not the case? Any info you can give us would be great!

smile.gif

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Mistelle's Comment
member avatar

Welcome aboard Mistelle and thanks for all that info!

I guess it's after the fact now, but life sure would have been 1000 times easier on you guys if you had gone through our High Road CDL Training Program before heading off to CRST. You would have been able to learn all of those materials from the comfort of your own home and had your permit in hand right away, basically allowing you to sleep through the entire first week while everyone else is trying to cram those materials down their throat day and night. But for anyone else reading this, make sure you go through our program before you start your official CDL training wherever that may be.

Now I have a question. You mentioned "Continental Truck Driving School" but you're going through CRST. Is CRST using a private truck driving school to train you guys? I was under the impression they have their own schools on their own property, but maybe that's not the case? Any info you can give us would be great!

smile.gif

I didn't find this site until I was already here at training. I actually found it through the app store at google. Lol. I did download the cdl training app and it was a great help except that it doesn't do the state by state rules. Texas is a little different. Though I can't remember what question it was that I found was wrong according to our book.

I am going through crst and they are using a private school. I think it is because I am from Texas and it was easier to train me here rather than in Iowa. That is all I can guess about that.

Basically from what I am understanding (can't refer back to the paperwork unfortunately), the school trains me and charges me. CRST picks up the tab and pays the school when I have completed my 8 month contract. I will have 40 dollars per week taken out of my paycheck until I am paid up. After I have finished my schooling here, I will be headed off to orientation in Oklahoma. Once I have completed orientation, I will be paired with a driver trainer for a minimum of 24 days to a maximum of 28 days. After the 28 days I will be paired back up with my husband (yes you read that right, we will be apart for 28 days. Part of the reason we thought we would like this, is that we will be together all the time like we prefer. Almost six years married and we haven't spent more than 12 hours apart from each other. Lol).

I'm not sure when we will get our first time off, nor am I sure if we will actually be getting back together right after the 28 days, or whenever they can get us together. I have heard it can take up to two weeks to get you to your team member. But then again I don't have anything concrete and I have already found out the hard way that the recruiters don't know everything about what happens.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Mistelle's Comment
member avatar

Here is the contact information for the school.

Continental Truck Driving 6704 S R L Thornton Fwy Dallas, TX 75232 ยท South Dallas (972) 224-5551

The teacher Ray is really awesome. He teaches in such a way you walk out of the class feeling like you didn't learn anything but when you go to test, you remember everything he said. He has funny stories and was once a fleet owner. He makes do, with what he has to teach with and tries his best to teach each student according to their needs. I think he would do a whole lot better if they gave him two weeks to teach the subject matter rather than four days.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Mistelle, all the company training schools are very fast paced, just hang in there. I know it can be stressful, but am confident you and your husband can handle it. The toughest part is going to be the actual training period while you guys are separated. You've simply got to make a commitment to making this work. I'm warning you that there will be times that you are going to want to give up and walk away, but don't do it, and be careful about calling each other and pouring out to each other about how miserable you are, it will only make it harder on both of you.

Just prepare your minds for a tough time. I had to keep reminding myself that this is only temporary, and it will soon be coming to an end. I'm not trying to scare you, but only want you to be mentally prepared for a tough time. I wrote a blog post about how your trainer will be testing you on more than just your ability to drive a truck. Check it out, you may find something helpful there.

Hang in there, we're all pulling for you!

Mistelle's Comment
member avatar

Mistelle, all the company training schools are very fast paced, just hang in there. I know it can be stressful, but am confident you and your husband can handle it. The toughest part is going to be the actual training period while you guys are separated. You've simply got to make a commitment to making this work. I'm warning you that there will be times that you are going to want to give up and walk away, but don't do it, and be careful about calling each other and pouring out to each other about how miserable you are, it will only make it harder on both of you.

Just prepare your minds for a tough time. I had to keep reminding myself that this is only temporary, and it will soon be coming to an end. I'm not trying to scare you, but only want you to be mentally prepared for a tough time. I wrote a blog post about how your trainer will be testing you on more than just your ability to drive a truck. Check it out, you may find something helpful there.

Hang in there, we're all pulling for you!

Thanks! I read this to my husband and we have made an agreement to only share good news and things we have learned. I'm sure we are going to slip up but at least this way we won't bring each other down.

I'll be reading that article to him momentarily. (I have been reading at 4th year college level since sixth grade, so I get to do all the reading)

Mistelle's Comment
member avatar

Tada! We made it through the first day of driving! We spent the morning backing the truck up. It took a while but once I figured out that if I can see the trailer wheels too much I need to turn my wheel left. If I can't see them, then I need to turn it right. (btw, this is while looking in the driver's side mirror)

After lunch we practiced shifting and double clutching. Dear lord, my left foot and right hand just don't seem to cooperate too well. I'm sure that I will get it someday. Thus far, the teachers have been really patient. Though one jokingly acted like he was going to bail out of the truck. After we all laughed I didn't feel so stressed.

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Double Clutching:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Awesome!

I'm glad the trainers are trying to keep the mood light. That's a really big deal. Nobody learns well when they're stressed out and being screamed at. So it's nice you guys were joking around.

Yap, you'll get the hang of shifting and double clutching soon enough. Then you'll get out of school, get done with training, and realize you don't need to use the clutch at all to shift. It's called "floating" the gears. Honestly, experienced driver can't understand why they still teach double clutching, but they do, so you have to roll with it for now. But once you get your own truck you won't double clutch anymore. It's just a temporary inconvenience.

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Double Clutching:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Mistelle's Comment
member avatar

Awesome!

I'm glad the trainers are trying to keep the mood light. That's a really big deal. Nobody learns well when they're stressed out and being screamed at. So it's nice you guys were joking around.

Yap, you'll get the hang of shifting and double clutching soon enough. Then you'll get out of school, get done with training, and realize you don't need to use the clutch at all to shift. It's called "floating" the gears. Honestly, experienced driver can't understand why they still teach double clutching, but they do, so you have to roll with it for now. But once you get your own truck you won't double clutch anymore. It's just a temporary inconvenience.

Today we got to practice parallel parking. I think I've got it. It was a lot harder than regular parallel parking of a car. But! I have discovered that my husband and I were the best in the class at it.

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Double Clutching:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

PR aka Road Hog's Comment
member avatar

Tuesday we studied a little bit and then headed off to the DPS to take the tests for special permits and combination. We studied really hard during class and then were up till late (around midnight) studying to pass the test. Both my husband and I passed the tests. After we got back, we went straight to our room and started to study for air brakes and pretrip. We invited some of the other students to our room to help them catch up with reviews of the precious tests and read the chapters aloud for the next two tests.

Wednesday we studied air brakes and pretrip in class for four or five hours, then we headed off to DPS to take the tests. Both my husband and I studied really hard and we passed. When we got back, we studied for general knowledge. We invited a friend from the classes to study with us (he has dyslexia and thus needed a little bit of help with the reading parts of it, he can read, just not very fast and this course is fast)

Thursday we studied general knowledge in class and then headed over to the dmv to take the tests. My husband and I passed again. We keep tying on score so we can't really say one is better than the other. A little competition between us to help keep us on our edge.

Friday we spent the day catching up on the class work. We finished it all and watched some videos. The class didn't feel rushed at all. Seemed to drag by today.

WOW! They REALLY cram that stuff in !! Man, I'm REALLY starting to appreciate doing the High Road CDL Training Program at home!

Thanks again Brett thank-you.gif

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

Page 1 of 4 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

This topic has the following tags:

CRST Van Expedited Attending Truck Driving School CDL Test Preparation CDL Training Reports From CDL Training Truck Driver Training
Click on any of the buttons above to view topics with that tag, or you can view a list of all forum tags here.

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More