Greyhound Bus To Company-sponsored CDL Training

Topic 11429 | Page 1

Page 1 of 1
Kenny S.'s Comment
member avatar

So I gotta ask since I'll be making the trip Friday.... How bad is the ride? What makes it so bad on the bus

Second Chance's Comment
member avatar

My friend rode the bus. 17 hour trip. I guess it sucks because there isn't room to spread out, you could be surrounded by sick people and crying, and whining kids, hard to sleep, ect. However, it's all what you make of it. Bring a fully charged phone and some music, maybe and iPad for l a movie or two and you'll be fine!

Steve L.'s Comment
member avatar

So I gotta ask since I'll be making the trip Friday.... How bad is the ride? What makes it so bad on the bus

The biggest two problems with it are;

1. The trip takes a lot longer than if it was just a straight shot. Sometimes several hours longer. And

2. You're not usually traveling with the best of our society. However, I'm sure many of your traveling partners would go another way if they could afford it. So be nice, make a friend and you just might enjoy the ride. Hopefully it'll be your last on a Greyhound.

Good luck.

DonInOz's Comment
member avatar

The ride is sloooooooooow and the seats not the most comfortable for napping along the way. And yes, not to sound like a snob, but the terminals tend not to be in the nicest parts of town and do attract some shady characters. I rode Greyhound direct Miami-LA many years ago when I was 18 - it was something like 80 hour' trip - and it was bad enough. One would have thought I'd learned my lesson! But many years later, when I left the USN, I decided to use the bus to get from San Angelo to Miami...not as long but still a day and two nights, AND I was then in my mid-thirties. Oy! If I were about to start CDL school in a distant city and was given the choice between the bus or the cash value of the ticket to arrange my own transport...I'd strongly consider digging into my own pocket and take the latter option, and fly there, as miserable s flying can be nowadays!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Phox's Comment
member avatar

I have been on greyhound a number of times... mostly shorter trips between dallas and houston / san antonio but I also did NYC to boston and back (guess that was kind of a shorter trip too). I don't mind it that much. Almost all the buses have power ports now so I bring my laptop and external hard drive with my collection of movies... I'm good for a while :D

lot of times the driver stops for his break at place with food so you can get a bite to eat as well and stretch your legs.

i think taking a greyhound is a good way to prep for trucking... you're gonna be in a vehicle for long hours with limited stretching time and ability.

Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

Got on the greyhound today to head to Denver for school in keenesberg. Heading out from Portland,Oregon head east on i-84. Apparently there was a two truck collision with fatalities and also involved hazmat. They closed the road. We been at the truck stop since 630. At 245 the driver told us greyhound is putting us up in a hotel. And we will leave around noon.

I am just worried about getting to school on time and getting situated. But at least greyhound is taking care of a bus load of 26 passengers

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Ryan R.'s Comment
member avatar

The greyhound buses here in California seem pretty nice to me. A lot of the people in them seem of questionable character, however. That kind of worked for me though because the women tended to sit next to and around me since I didn't look like a criminal. Plus the bus drivers were only speaking Spanish, and my Spanish is fairly limited. I decided I'd drive my car after the experience.

ChefsJK's Comment
member avatar

Best advice I can give is if possible try and get a seat next to tje emergency windows, they have a lot more leg roon than the other seats and you wont mind sitting next to someone as much if you are able to stretch out your legs.

Sailor Jerry's Comment
member avatar

I was on a Greyhound a few weeks ago from SW Florida to our Jacksonville terminal. The guy 2 seats up from me was peeing his pants and puking on the floor. Every breath burned my nose on that ride for hours. I told the driver to get him off the bus or else put up hazmat placards Lol.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Page 1 of 1

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More