Should I Go With An OTR Trainer???

Topic 11927 | Page 1

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TreeTheTrucker's Comment
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I've been doing local runs with a trainer because my company(Celadon) doesn't have any OTR trainers available at the moment. In order to get in my own truck I have to complete 10k miles with a trainer. Here's my issue, I feel as though I'm good with the local trainer because I drive everyday and we deliver loads for Lowes(various locations). So Im backing every day at least 5 times a day to a dock somewhere(averaging about 300-350 miles per day). I spoke to an OTR trainer and he said he might bump a dock once a day if he's lucky. Should I stay with my local trainer where I can polish my skills, or is it something I'm missing not training with an OTR trainer?

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Hrynn's Comment
member avatar

I've been doing local runs with a trainer because my company(Celadon) doesn't have any OTR trainers available at the moment. In order to get in my own truck I have to complete 10k miles with a trainer. Here's my issue, I feel as though I'm good with the local trainer because I drive everyday and we deliver loads for Lowes(various locations). So Im backing every day at least 5 times a day to a dock somewhere(averaging about 300-350 miles per day). I spoke to an OTR trainer and he said he might bump a dock once a day if he's lucky. Should I stay with my local trainer where I can polish my skills, or is it something I'm missing not training with an OTR trainer?

Backing practice is great and I wish I had the opportunity to practice that much while I was with my trainer. But, is this a home every night type of job? Trip planning becomes more complicated when you have to factor in time changes, multistop loads, and multiple days so you are missing a lot of that. It's also going to take you a lot longer to get your 10,000 miles done only doing 300-350 every day and you are not getting a complete picture of the lifestyle you are going to be living. If it is possible, I think a best case scenario would be to stick with who you've got for a while and take advantage of all that backing practice, but maybe see if they can find you an OTR trainer for at least half of it. That is what I would want in your scenario.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Michael's Comment
member avatar

I don't know anything about Celadon and yes your missing out on a lot, when 350 miles turns into 620 miles there is more involved. Also want to throw in it is always nice to have someone on board when doing the Mountains especially if there is snow, ice and chains involved, but I am just going off of what you posted.

David's Comment
member avatar

I would continue doing what your doing now and as soon as an OTR trainer comes up, get on board with them. You are missing out on quite a bit. However, averging 350mi a day would only take 28.57 days to get 10k miles. But you are missing out on training for the true open road. Mountains, traffic, the real joys of trucking.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

∆_Danielsahn_∆'s Comment
member avatar

My guess, is that you have already had more backing opportunities than a lot of people in OTR training will ever get. So you are already a step ahead of the game. Like the other's have said, once an OTR trainer is available, it is time to pound out some miles. It will also get your 10k miles done faster, so you can get into your own truck.

Stay safe

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Tree, there's things that go on while you're OTR that don't happen on your city job. I told you before your current work makes you an expert at backing, but now you need to learn the secrets of OTR.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

TreeTheTrucker's Comment
member avatar

Thanks for the replies guys I appreciate them a lot. I've told my advocate to try to get me an OTR trainer when I eclipse 5k miles(I have about 2500 as of now). And I have experienced traffic and the mountains(had my first experience with overheating brakes, and engine braking this week!). But I pick up what you guys are putting down, and I greatly appreciate your input.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Michael's Comment
member avatar

I don't mean for this to come across as being smart or anything, but really if this is your first time and your wanting to go solo don't rush it because if they do a team drive thats only 5 days or less of OTR for you. You got to experience over heating the brakes, what mountain was that if you don't mind my asking? Yea,I'm being a care bear right now lol, but on a serious note, we'll just assume it was a 6% grade you smoked them on and only had 40k in the wagon. You go solo and hit the this mountain that is 9% you have 45k in the wagon and the speed limit is 25 mph with hair pin curves in it, that is a real mountain out east btw. How will you go down it? Next you have your calculating, where your going to shut down for the night, will you make it there before it gets full, or you have a multi stop load/unload, how much time can you give each before it jeopardizes the rest of the stops and my favorite they send you a preplan with a deadhead of 250 miles and 4 hours to get there and delivers 455 miles away that night. I'm not picking just letting you know when first starting and you miss an apt time they might let the first one slide, the second you will probably notice fewer miles.

Deadhead:

To drive with an empty trailer. After delivering your load you will deadhead to a shipper to pick up your next load.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar
if they do a team drive thats only 5 days or less of OTR for you.

What do you mean? Most companies get you over the road for several weeks driving team with an instructor.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Michael's Comment
member avatar

The way I understood it was he only needs 10k miles, and wants to stay local till he hits 5k, leaving him only 5k more miles to go. If they team one sleeps other drives he will hit the remaining 5k if they both cover 1k miles a day allowing him to go solo.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

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