Almost Time To Decide, Maverick Or McElroy

Topic 12159 | Page 1

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rightlane's Comment
member avatar

Happy new year everyone!

Well I test for my CDL 4 January and am down to just deciding which company to start out with. Trying to decide between Maverick and McElroy. Have read the posts on both companies, chatted with drivers from each company, researched each company, and have made a spreadsheet listing each company's benefits. Both are good companies, both offer a couple of things the other does not, my gut tells me Maverick, then it tells me McElroy! The good news is that it is nice to have options and I feel that with either company, staying there a year plus would be easy to do. Not asking you all which company to go with, as I know the answer that is given on this site and that makes total sense to me. This journey started back in June when I decided to get my CDL and phase one of the journey, getting my CDL, will be done, hopefully, next week. Phase two is picking a company and heading off to orientation, is now within site. Phase three will be finishing training and then getting my own truck!!!

Guess I don't really have any questions, just making a post about where I am in this process and wanted to give thanks to all who have posted on this site. Lots of good info to be found here.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
James R.'s Comment
member avatar

Good luck buddy

Steve_HBG's Comment
member avatar

Thanks for sharing the progress you've made, along with the decision you face.

Regardless of the choice you make, I'm sure you will be successful, especially with the determination and the ambition you have to enter the industry.

Good luck, and all the best to you!

Happy New Year.

S.B.'s Comment
member avatar

Happy new year everyone!

Well I test for my CDL 4 January and am down to just deciding which company to start out with. Trying to decide between Maverick and McElroy. Have read the posts on both companies, chatted with drivers from each company, researched each company, and have made a spreadsheet listing each company's benefits. Both are good companies, both offer a couple of things the other does not, my gut tells me Maverick, then it tells me McElroy! The good news is that it is nice to have options and I feel that with either company, staying there a year plus would be easy to do. Not asking you all which company to go with, as I know the answer that is given on this site and that makes total sense to me. This journey started back in June when I decided to get my CDL and phase one of the journey, getting my CDL, will be done, hopefully, next week. Phase two is picking a company and heading off to orientation, is now within site. Phase three will be finishing training and then getting my own truck!!!

Guess I don't really have any questions, just making a post about where I am in this process and wanted to give thanks to all who have posted on this site. Lots of good info to be found here.

Where are you located? I'm new with McElroy. Few weeks under my belt. Us South / North Carolina and Virginia boys run mostly building materials, lumber, sheetrock, Lowes, shingles, ect and it can get slow in the Winter. The sheetrock has been short hauls, but there is a minimum pay depending where you are hauling out of. The guys in Alabama, Tenn, Texas ect run all that and steel, so they have more options in the winter. Out the Pleasant Hill, NC terminal we don't haul any steel or anything requiring chains, we only strap. To haul steel you have to go down to Cuba, Alabama to train. Most the loads such as Lowes and Sheetrock are pre-tarped (Drop and Hook), but you will have to bungee them and fix / tighten straps. Lumber must be tarped, but many places have a tarping machine, a few don't. Lowes runs are great, you pick up a trailer from distribution, run it to a store loaded, then have to take it back to distribution and get paid the same empty miles, which you will learn empty is easy. So if you take it 300 miles, you will turn around and return for 300 empty. This is because these trailers belong to Lowes.

I have been home every weekend, leaving out on Sunday. Holidays I've had good time off. This week I came home on 12-30 and go back out 1-3 Sunday. Had 4 days off for Christmas also. Both slow weeks you will receive the minimal pay, 600 dollars.....if you don't get miles / loads. The company also pays for / gives you free health insurance and free disability / life insurance. I just started and Mr. McElroy sent me a Wal-Mart gift card for Christmas. Seems like a good company in my opinion. That said, they take training very serious, lots of testsing, written open book on policy and backing skills they are big on testing.

Biggest thing to consider, if you live in the Carolinas / Virgina or mid Atlantic, it may get slow in Late December and January, but there is a minimum pay guarantee and lay over ect. From what I'm told Spring and Summer will be booming. Such is the flatbed industry.

Mavrick is Automatics, McElroy runs International Prostars 10 speeds. Oldest trucks I've seen are 2013 and heard Mr McElroy was trying to phase them out, was some issues with the 12 and 13's.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

rightlane's Comment
member avatar

Good luck buddy

Thanks James R. It is nice to have options as we enter into our new careers.

rightlane's Comment
member avatar

Thanks for sharing the progress you've made, along with the decision you face.

Regardless of the choice you make, I'm sure you will be successful, especially with the determination and the ambition you have to enter the industry.

Good luck, and all the best to you!

Happy New Year.

Thanks Steve B.! Good luck to you also as you travel down this road!

rightlane's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Happy new year everyone!

Well I test for my CDL 4 January and am down to just deciding which company to start out with. Trying to decide between Maverick and McElroy. Have read the posts on both companies, chatted with drivers from each company, researched each company, and have made a spreadsheet listing each company's benefits. Both are good companies, both offer a couple of things the other does not, my gut tells me Maverick, then it tells me McElroy! The good news is that it is nice to have options and I feel that with either company, staying there a year plus would be easy to do. Not asking you all which company to go with, as I know the answer that is given on this site and that makes total sense to me. This journey started back in June when I decided to get my CDL and phase one of the journey, getting my CDL, will be done, hopefully, next week. Phase two is picking a company and heading off to orientation, is now within site. Phase three will be finishing training and then getting my own truck!!!

Guess I don't really have any questions, just making a post about where I am in this process and wanted to give thanks to all who have posted on this site. Lots of good info to be found here.

double-quotes-end.png

Where are you located? I'm new with McElroy. Few weeks under my belt. Us South / North Carolina and Virginia boys run mostly building materials, lumber, sheetrock, Lowes, shingles, ect and it can get slow in the Winter. The sheetrock has been short hauls, but there is a minimum pay depending where you are hauling out of. The guys in Alabama, Tenn, Texas ect run all that and steel, so they have more options in the winter. Out the Pleasant Hill, NC terminal we don't haul any steel or anything requiring chains, we only strap. To haul steel you have to go down to Cuba, Alabama to train. Most the loads such as Lowes and Sheetrock are pre-tarped (Drop and Hook), but you will have to bungee them and fix / tighten straps. Lumber must be tarped, but many places have a tarping machine, a few don't. Lowes runs are great, you pick up a trailer from distribution, run it to a store loaded, then have to take it back to distribution and get paid the same empty miles, which you will learn empty is easy. So if you take it 300 miles, you will turn around and return for 300 empty. This is because these trailers belong to Lowes.

I have been home every weekend, leaving out on Sunday. Holidays I've had good time off. This week I came home on 12-30 and go back out 1-3 Sunday. Had 4 days off for Christmas also. Both slow weeks you will receive the minimal pay, 600 dollars.....if you don't get miles / loads. The company also pays for / gives you free health insurance and free disability / life insurance. I just started and Mr. McElroy sent me a Wal-Mart gift card for Christmas. Seems like a good company in my opinion. That said, they take training very serious, lots of testsing, written open book on policy and backing skills they are big on testing.

Biggest thing to consider, if you live in the Carolinas / Virgina or mid Atlantic, it may get slow in Late December and January, but there is a minimum pay guarantee and lay over ect. From what I'm told Spring and Summer will be booming. Such is the flatbed industry.

Mavrick is Automatics, McElroy runs International Prostars 10 speeds. Oldest trucks I've seen are 2013 and heard Mr McElroy was trying to phase them out, was some issues with the 12 and 13's.

Hey S.B.! I live in central Kentucky, south of Lexington. What interested me in McElroy, is getting you home on Fridays, the higher tuition reimbursement, free driver healthcare, being able to park at Lowe's overnight or on home time and pre loaded/tarped loads to mention a few perks. Was reading through the info packet about orientation, if I decided on McElroy, I will have to buy a few collared shirts as I saw were tee shirts were not allowed. No problem though. Thanks for the input, I might have a few more questions for you if you have the time.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

S.B.'s Comment
member avatar

Hey S.B.! I live in central Kentucky, south of Lexington. What interested me in McElroy, is getting you home on Fridays, the higher tuition reimbursement, free driver healthcare, being able to park at Lowe's overnight or on home time and pre loaded/tarped loads to mention a few perks. Was reading through the info packet about orientation, if I decided on McElroy, I will have to buy a few collared shirts as I saw were tee shirts were not allowed. No problem though. Thanks for the input, I might have a few more questions for you if you have the time.

You'll need a few collared shirts for orientation, polo or simple button up. Jeans are fine. Nothing fancy, even the trainers wear jeans and plain button up shirts. Many drivers just drive comfortable in t-shirts, then put on their collared shirt on over it when they arrive at the customer. It's about how you present yourself to the customer, and how you look at the terminal when you get out the truck. They really do get you home Friday, if something happens and you are stuck out on the road, they pay you, so they do a good job routing you back near home for a pick-up Thursday or Friday. Being in Kentucky you will likely be able to haul steel, the Tenn Terminal does, which will give more options for loads in the Winter. Realize McElroy is regional runs, so you won't get the long hauls and miles like the over the road guys, you'll have to manage your clock so you can get more loads inorder to make money. A lot of guys complain about the miles and waiting for loads in winter, but this is regional work and they are routing you home every weekend. Usually you will stay within a 500 mile radius of home, occasionally getting a longer haul.

I haven't been on long at all, but If you have any questions, feel free to hit me up.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

C T.'s Comment
member avatar

Do they hire Georgia residents by any chance?

rightlane's Comment
member avatar

I haven't been on long at all, but If you have any questions, feel free to hit me up.

Thanks S.B. Sent you a message.

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