Any Roehl Drivers Recommend A Fleet?

Topic 12215 | Page 1

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tripletdad's Comment
member avatar

so I'll be leaving later this month or next, hopefully next... just trying to get some ideas on which fleet to try to get on.

1-hometime plus would be great, but I'd rather not slip seat, so I think that leaves me with national, out 10-14 days, home 3. I'm fine with that for my first year or two.

2-right now we live in ohio. the plan is to move to texas, asap. Dallas area, specifically. I know roehl has a terminal in dallas, so I think that would be a benefit.

3-I'm still not sure if I want van or flatbed. I know reefer doesnt seem like anything I would like. I'm in good enough shape to do flatbed, so that's not an issue. I just want to make as much as I can, while sitting as little as possible.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

ATXJEHU's Comment
member avatar

Sounds like you are on the right track. During my 15 months with Roehl, I was based out of the Dallas (Grand Prairie) Terminal which is a bit on the small side, but had amenities for staying overnight, however, no truck maintenance or refueling available onsite (there was talk at that time about bringing on some maintenance staff, so this may have changed). I ran Texas Regional for about 8 months before going into the national fleet. It's hard to get decent miles on the regional gig. Drivers OTR seemed to do well, however, and that was my experience too. Their main flatbed operations are in Gary, IN and Phoenix, AZ. We rarely saw any flatbeds in Dallas. Flatbed pays a higher mileage rate, but mostly live loading and unloading cuts into miles. I did dry van and had probably 75% drop and hook , so you have a better chance to rack up miles as a "door slammer" like me. Roehl is a good company and treated me well. Sure, there were some exasperating times when things did not go as planned, but that's the nature of this industry. Good luck, keep a positive outlook, be cooperative and things will go well for you at Roehl.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

Joseph D.'s Comment
member avatar

I'm not sure about the Ohio or Texas area, but I am on a dedicated account for Georgia Pacific. I get a minimum of 2000 miles per week if not more and home every weekend. They have been great to me so far. Their dry van fleet seems to get good consistent mileage. Talk to your recruiter, they are generally pretty honest and will help you pick a fleet that will be best for you.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Phillip M.'s Comment
member avatar

I am finishing my last day of phase 1 training with Roehl. It's been a good experience so far. When I got finish with my trainer I'll be running TX regional. I've been pleased with my choice of Roehl so far.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

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