Pepsi

Topic 12565 | Page 1

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:
Sam IV's Comment
member avatar

I just went to DMV to get permit and passed general knowledge and air brakes but failed combination. So next week will take and get my CDL A permit. I have a interview with Pepsi on February 2nd. Looking at going local but if not I still going to Millis in April. I already been accepted at Millis, waiting to get my three weeks vacation at current job to cash that out. So excited for either job.(always want to drive a semi just couldn't do it tell now.)

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

C T.'s Comment
member avatar

Please keep us updated if you could. I am in school currently and considering Pepsi or Coke. I understand the pay isn't too much to start however. Do you know what you'll be making?

Sam IV's Comment
member avatar

Please keep us updated if you could. I am in school currently and considering Pepsi or Coke. I understand the pay isn't too much to start however. Do you know what you'll be making?

On the application it say 19.45 per hour.

Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

Not to sound discouraging or anything - but.

Have friend who was a district manager for pepsi. Asked him about a driving job.

He told me - you see all those nice stacks of pepsi cases in the supermarkets - 12 feet high, all nice and arranged? GUESS WHO DOES THAT.

Pepsi (and many other distribution drivers) are the ones who unload and stock product in supermarkets (even the ones that drive tractor trailers). If you're driving a trailer with a liftgate - chances are - YOU are the guy who is unloading, and at multiple stops a day.

Now - if you're into this type of work, great.

My friend knew that I ain't the type to go in for this - and he had no OTR positions.

Not to say that, as an OTR driver, you won't have to drag pallets of your box and onto a dock once in awhile.

Therein lies the difference between OTR, and local/distro type of work.

Rick

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
C T.'s Comment
member avatar

Yes I understand the difference and have my reasons for wanting to do local for a bit. Work won't bother me as much as a hungry baby would, I'm considering flatbed also. I love having all these options after school.

Sam IV's Comment
member avatar

Not to sound discouraging or anything - but.

Have friend who was a district manager for pepsi. Asked him about a driving job.

He told me - you see all those nice stacks of pepsi cases in the supermarkets - 12 feet high, all nice and arranged? GUESS WHO DOES THAT.

Pepsi (and many other distribution drivers) are the ones who unload and stock product in supermarkets (even the ones that drive tractor trailers). If you're driving a trailer with a liftgate - chances are - YOU are the guy who is unloading, and at multiple stops a day.

Now - if you're into this type of work, great.

My friend knew that I ain't the type to go in for this - and he had no OTR positions.

Not to say that, as an OTR driver, you won't have to drag pallets of your box and onto a dock once in awhile.

Therein lies the difference between OTR, and local/distro type of work.

Rick

I work at a Walmart warehouse now. It would almost the same work other than driving truck. I don't mind the work since I do it everyday at Walmart. This is my first option if not I got approved at Millis.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
DumDriver's Comment
member avatar

Not to sound discouraging or anything - but.

Have friend who was a district manager for pepsi. Asked him about a driving job.

He told me - you see all those nice stacks of pepsi cases in the supermarkets - 12 feet high, all nice and arranged? GUESS WHO DOES THAT.

Pepsi (and many other distribution drivers) are the ones who unload and stock product in supermarkets (even the ones that drive tractor trailers). If you're driving a trailer with a liftgate - chances are - YOU are the guy who is unloading, and at multiple stops a day.

Now - if you're into this type of work, great.

My friend knew that I ain't the type to go in for this - and he had no OTR positions.

Not to say that, as an OTR driver, you won't have to drag pallets of your box and onto a dock once in awhile.

Therein lies the difference between OTR, and local/distro type of work.

Rick

As a Pepsi driver you won't build those big displays in supermarkets. They have merchandisers that do that. At the most you'll build a display in drug stores once in awhile, but most likely you'll be doing small convenience stores, gas stations and things like that.

If you're lucky enough to get bulk (supermarkets, walmarts etc etc) that's just wheeling off pallets with an electric jack.

In terms of money, you can do well. You'll work hard for it, but you can make 60-70 your first year of your in the right area. Independant shops can actually be a little better than PepsiCo these days.

If you have any questions feel free to email me. It's not a perfect gig, but you could do worse.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Sam IV's Comment
member avatar

Please keep us updated if you could. I am in school currently and considering Pepsi or Coke. I understand the pay isn't too much to start however. Do you know what you'll be making?

Hello everybody, I had my first interview with Pepsi on Tuesday. I think it went well and after the information they gave me I am going to Millis in the first part of April. It is a Union and the starting fee is $125 plus 10% of your wages, $45,000 to $55000 per year. The position I went for was Relief driver full time. Well in the job description it says they will take cdl permit but when I went to interview they are only hiring for cdl holders no cdl permits. I only have a cdl permit. For the relief driver position, you would have 5 different job functions. The start time for the 5 different jobs is between 2 am to 6:30 am. They ask me what I want at Pepsi and I told them I want to became a regular driver(not relief) eventually. They kind of chuckled and said you will be waiting a while because everybody has 10 years or more getting into that kind of jobs.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
KaoMinerva's Comment
member avatar

Please keep us updated if you could. I am in school currently and considering Pepsi or Coke. I understand the pay isn't too much to start however. Do you know what you'll be making?

I will tell you this about PEPSI/COKE/7UP ETC.... YOU WILL WORK YOUR ASS OFF. There is no easy day with these jobs unless you are a bulk driver ONLY! I worked for 7up about a month and quit. I could do the job, but management is so screwed up and the stops they expected to be made just didn't sit well with me. Trust me, this is the work load you'll see as an example.

Let's say your first stop is Wal-Mart right? The workload goes as follows since you will be delivering PALLETS of good that will need to be brought in by pallet jack once backed in.

7up - 1 or 2 pallets Pepsi - 3 - 5 pallets COKE - 5 or MORE on average

Trust me on this. Pepsi is like in the middle where I'm from with COKE being the big dogs. I've seen COKE/PEPSI deliver 100 cases BY HAND into a mom and pop corner store with gang members sitting around just watching. Very scared sight coming from a guy that knows the streets himself.

KaoMinerva's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Please keep us updated if you could. I am in school currently and considering Pepsi or Coke. I understand the pay isn't too much to start however. Do you know what you'll be making?

double-quotes-end.png

Hello everybody, I had my first interview with Pepsi on Tuesday. I think it went well and after the information they gave me I am going to Millis in the first part of April. It is a Union and the starting fee is $125 plus 10% of your wages, $45,000 to $55000 per year. The position I went for was Relief driver full time. Well in the job description it says they will take cdl permit but when I went to interview they are only hiring for cdl holders no cdl permits. I only have a cdl permit. For the relief driver position, you would have 5 different job functions. The start time for the 5 different jobs is between 2 am to 6:30 am. They ask me what I want at Pepsi and I told them I want to became a regular driver(not relief) eventually. They kind of chuckled and said you will be waiting a while because everybody has 10 years or more getting into that kind of jobs.

Forgot to mention that also....PEPSI IS A UNION JOB. Good luck getting promotions. My friend worked there and all the old guys were in positions with no intention on leaving. 45K-55K a year is a lie trust me. You'll barely see 2K every two weeks.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More