Getting Experiece Before Taking Test

Topic 12617 | Page 1

Page 1 of 1
Philly Fan 's Comment
member avatar

I am curious if a student driver with a permit in PA, could ride along with a willing owner operator who is home each night, in order to gain experience. I have 11 four hour training sessions with my school from now till FEB 20th, then take my test, and the next one is not for couple days. Maybe I could find a driver willing to let a newbie ride along. I of course would pay something for the experience. I imagine there is some sort of insurance necessary. I don't necessarily need to drive but that would be a plus. I live in the Lehigh valley.

Or is this completely not possible?

Owner Operator:

An owner-operator is a driver who either owns or leases the truck they are driving. A self-employed driver.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Hi, Glenn!

First off, companies only accept drive time documented in a school. If your school offers at least 160 hours of instruction (classroom + driving), that is acceptable for nearly any company. Though extra practice will certainly help your driving, it won't help you get a job with a major trucking company.

The real truth about trucking schools is they do prepare you to (hopefully) pass the CDL skills test and that's about it. Every company that would hire you will provide paid road training in some form.

Do you have a company in mind yet? Trucking Truth can help you Choose A Company.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Philly Fan 's Comment
member avatar

Thank you Errol. This idea is strictly to gain experience. The CDL driving hours are spread over the next two weeks and I am looking for an additional comfort level for when I go to a company for Orientation.

I am considering all Flatbed companies and have not ruled out any. I will list them in preference but truly none have been ruled out. So many factors to consider, tomorrow I am creating a poster board spread sheet to help get it sorted out. I have applied to Maverick TMC and Melton. Do you think that there is wrong with applying to them all?

Here is my preference list

Maverick Melton McElroy Tmc Roehl.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Glenn wonders:

Do you think that there is wrong with applying to them all?

rofl-3.gif How about applying to everybody all at once?

Apply For Truck Driving Jobs will do just that. For you it's one and done. You could ignore emails & calls from companies you're not interested in. Here's some more advice: Understanding Pre-Hires

For additional reading, check out Brett's Book and the Truck Driver's Career Guide

Pre-hire:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

Pre-hires:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

Phil C.'s Comment
member avatar

I am curious if a student driver with a permit in PA, could ride along with a willing owner operator who is home each night, in order to gain experience. I have 11 four hour training sessions with my school from now till FEB 20th, then take my test, and the next one is not for couple days. Maybe I could find a driver willing to let a newbie ride along. I of course would pay something for the experience. I imagine there is some sort of insurance necessary. I don't necessarily need to drive but that would be a plus. I live in the Lehigh valley.

Or is this completely not possible?

Sure you could ride along but you would learn very little. What a new driver needs is time behind the wheel. It wouldn't hurt you to ride along and ask questions and such, and might even help a little. You would not be able to drive unless you were on the insurance and the owner allowed it.

Phil

Owner Operator:

An owner-operator is a driver who either owns or leases the truck they are driving. A self-employed driver.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Glenn is curious:

I am curious if a student driver with a permit in PA, could ride along

An additional thought. Even after you ride all that time with your official trainer - 5 weeks to 6 months depending on the company - that First Day on your own, you'll seem to forget "everything" anyway!

Philly Fan 's Comment
member avatar

Thanks Guys, I went with TMC. It did not go well they train and test on 13 speeds. I had four times out on the road with no prior experience except CDL school. I put a lot of pressure on myself and did not relax. Each time out you had a different instructor with different methods to help you get better. Two were real stern and put out some serious negativity if you slipped up so the pressure only increased. This may have been part of there process but it certainly increased my frustration. They were very experienced but not good communicators. It made for a stressful situation, TMC was very regimented right from the start and it did not ease up at all. The class started with 22, two were sent packing, two dropped, two went home during the second week, and two including myself were not offered the 5weeks with a trainer. I am highly disappointed of course and feel I was very close to getting it together with the progressive shifting. I am not trashing TMC, I just wish they could have helped me along more because once I get it, I am going to be a very valuable employee. So now I need some guidance on my next move. I really want to be with a flatbed company, I want the activity of securing and tarping loads. Maverick is not in my area for flatbed. I could consider Maverick's other lines and hope to transfer if things change.

So that leaves Melton and Roehl as my choices. Will being sent home by TMC jeopardize my future? Will it be a blotch on my DAC report?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Page 1 of 1

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More