Flat Spot On Tires - Please Explain

Topic 12618 | Page 2

Page 2 of 3 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:
Miss Red's Comment
member avatar

Drug his tires, tires were not moving, and skidded off all the rubber. tires are shot need replaced. Could have been frozen and not released, from driving in snow and slush then parking in below freezing temps. Could also be a frozen or kinked airline. Basically the spring brakes need air pressure to release them from parking mode, pushing the springs back. So either air was not getting to the brake chamber, or air got there but the pushrod and S-cam assembly was frozen, or the shoes were frozen to the drums. All of which cause a no-turn situation. These are either his engage only drive axle or his trailer tires since you would really know it if your normal drive axle had a frozen brake somewhere.

Phil

OK, so they weren't spinning for one reason or another and this is from friction? Also, is there a way to prevent this? I mean, if it's from driving in icy conditions and then parking overnight and driving again. Thanks for breaking it down to simple terms for me 😊

Scott O.'s Comment
member avatar

When it gets cold below freezing don't set your trailer brakes... The moisture on the brakes freeze and locks the brakes....

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

Miss Red, in cold slushy conditions, when you stop for a bit, DONT set your trailer brakes because they'll freeze up and be hell to break loose. There will be water on them, because your wherls are warm. The truck sits and that water will freeze and your brakes won't release.

On your tractor, make sure you have power going to both drive axles. Take off slow and easy and use your mirrors to check that your drives are actually turning.

it's a preventable thing that just takes attention that many rookies haven't been taught.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Miss Red's Comment
member avatar

Miss Red, in cold slushy conditions, when you stop for a bit, DONT set your trailer brakes because they'll freeze up and be hell to break loose. There will be water on them, because your wherls are warm. The truck sits and that water will freeze and your brakes won't release.

On your tractor, make sure you have power going to both drive axles. Take off slow and easy and use your mirrors to check that your drives are actually turning.

it's a preventable thing that just takes attention that many rookies haven't been taught.

👍👍 thank you👍👍

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Daniel's Comment
member avatar

Miss Red, in cold slushy conditions, when you stop for a bit, DONT set your trailer brakes because they'll freeze up and be hell to break loose. There will be water on them, because your wherls are warm. The truck sits and that water will freeze and your brakes won't release.

On your tractor, make sure you have power going to both drive axles. Take off slow and easy and use your mirrors to check that your drives are actually turning.

it's a preventable thing that just takes attention that many rookies haven't been taught.

Sort of related: Make sure you aren't parking on water... Ice under the tires makes for a rude awakening when trying to drive off with your load at 07:00. Lol

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Turbo Dan's Comment
member avatar

Like Sue D said, check your drives and also your Trailers as you start to roll, If you roll up with the brakes wet and warm and it's below Freezing then they could freeze and lock if you set them. If given some time to get cold before you set them, then shouldn't be a problem.

I had a lot of experience with locked up brakes as a mechanic in Chicago in the winter and as a Driver in ND oil fields, see if you can get themto break loose by going forward and back.

If they still won't break loose, then the trusty short handle 2Lb sledge is you friend,, get down and dirty and beat the offending Brake Shoe loose with a couple of well placed Hits.. :)

Also sometimes Water would get past the Dryer so we would Pop the trailer air supply line and por Alcohal (Methanol) into the Trailer air system to thaw out any frozen Brake Air valves as you pump the brakes.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Scott M's Comment
member avatar

This has not been mentioned: Swift sent this out- after parking for 1-2 hours, move you vehicle back and forth to break up any ice that may have formed in the brakes. I believe it was Errol who wrote about the Swift message.

I think it has already been mentioned to dry out the brakes by engaging the service brake and dragging your vehicle to heat up the brakes and evaporate any water in the brakes.

Miss Red's Comment
member avatar

Just to clarify, would I need to move every couple hours? Or just once? Also, is there a need to do this if you dried them out?

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Just to clarify, would I need to move every couple hours? Or just once? Also, is there a need to do this if you dried them out?

If you moved once after waiting an hour or two you wouldn't have to move again. You're breaking free any ice that may be forming before it gets any worse and you would be fine after doing it once.

I was one to drag my brakes while I was going through the parking lot or rest area approaching my final spot for the night. That will get the brakes plenty hot enough to dry any residual moisture off them. If anything you might get a little condensation on the brakes from the hot metal in the cold air but I very much doubt that would be enough to lock them up. But often times to be extra sure I would also leave my trailer brakes released.

Scott M's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Just to clarify, would I need to move every couple hours? Or just once? Also, is there a need to do this if you dried them out?

double-quotes-end.png

If you moved once after waiting an hour or two you wouldn't have to move again. You're breaking free any ice that may be forming before it gets any worse and you would be fine after doing it once.

I was one to drag my brakes while I was going through the parking lot or rest area approaching my final spot for the night. That will get the brakes plenty hot enough to dry any residual moisture off them. If anything you might get a little condensation on the brakes from the hot metal in the cold air but I very much doubt that would be enough to lock them up. But often times to be extra sure I would also leave my trailer brakes released.

Brett- I am inexperienced, so I was hoping an experienced driver would respond to Miss Red.

OK, so I park for the night, and don't engage the trailer brakes. Therefore there is air pressure in the system, so the pressure keeps the springs from pulling the brake pads against the drums. Won't the air gradually drain out, over night? Causing the trailer brakes to be engaged?

Page 2 of 3 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

This topic has the following tags:

Advice For New Truck Drivers Dealing With The Weather Pre-trip inspection (PTI) Tips for Parking Truck Equipment Truck Maintenance
Click on any of the buttons above to view topics with that tag, or you can view a list of all forum tags here.

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More