Don't Rush

Topic 13212 | Page 1

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miracleofmagick's Comment
member avatar

Yesterday I have myself a new reminder as to why you should never rush. Work fast, yes, but not rush. Rushing causes you to make mistakes, usually stupid ones.

I was dropping an empty trailer do I could pick up a loaded one and was starting to run low on my 14. Now, I drop trailers without incident on a fairly regular basis. This time, however, I was rushing because I wanted to get to my planned stop for my 10 hour before my time ran out.

As I was pulling away from the empty, I heard a sound like something had hit my truck. I got out to see what it was and found my airlines were completely straightened out and missing the glad hands. Somehow, in my rush, I completely forgot to detach my airlines from the trailer. So at this point I had to go get them replaced before I could pick up the trailer costing me more time than if I had just stopped a moment to make sure I did it right. Luckily, I had enough time on that load that picking out up in the morning is still allowing me to deliver on time.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Eric K.'s Comment
member avatar

I double and triple and even quadruple check the lines and landing gear. After I think I am all done, I do a walk around and check it all again. I've read too many stories and seen too many pics on Twisted Truckers to end up adding to them.

Thanks for the reminder!

Tom M.'s Comment
member avatar

I was in a hurry the other day and forgot to crank the landing gear up the rest of the way. Fortunately I had cranked it up enough that there was an inch or so of clearance and I was just pulling out and stopping to slide the tandems. And speaking of tandems , twice I've hooked a trailer and forgotten to check where the tandems were and drove it around with them all the way to the back. That's not fun.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Miracleofmagick, I had to learn about those hoses the hard way, too. Took three lessons!

One thing I do now, is handle the hoses first thing. Picking or dropping, get out of the truck, turn left and do the hoses. No matter what. I've also drug the landing gear on the ground. What a racket! (Makes everybody look at who's getting out of the cab!)

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
miracleofmagick's Comment
member avatar

Miracleofmagick, I had to learn about those hoses the hard way, too. Took three lessons!

One thing I do now, is handle the hoses first thing. Picking or dropping, get out of the truck, turn left and do the hoses. No matter what. I've also drug the landing gear on the ground. What a racket! (Makes everybody look at who's getting out of the cab!)

Lol, I do the landing gear first everyone because I forgot to put it up a couple of times when I first started. So I created a set routine for myself. Unfortunately, this time I broke the routine because I was rushing and paid the price.

The thing that gets me is that I know better than to rush like that, but I still did so anyways. One of my favorites sayings that was posted on a wall at a factory I used to work at was - if you don't have time to do something right the first time, how are you going to find time to do it again? If I lad just taken the moment to double check everything like I usually do, I would have saved myself a lot of time and trouble.

The funny thing was the lady at the shop I was sent to, commented that at least I asked to doing it. Apparently most drivers claim they don't know how something happened instead of admitting a mistake.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Mirakleofmagik observes:

Apparently most drivers claim they don't know how something happened instead of admitting a mistake.

They "claim" they don't know, but it's often more that they are ashamed to admit it.

If you forget the landing gear, either they grind on the ground or you have a fifteen minute workout coming. If you forget the hoses, you're out of commission till you get them replaced. A little grinding is no big deal.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
miracleofmagick's Comment
member avatar

Oh, I agree that they actually know and don't want to admit it. Personally, I have always been of the school of thought that you should own up to your mistakes. It makes learning from them a bit easier and if you don't learn from your mistakes you doom yourself to repeat them. Making mistakes is part of being human, we all do it. It's making the same mistake over and over that becomes a problem.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Miracleofmagick goes to the head of the class:

If you don't learn from your mistakes you doom yourself to repeat them.

People who are serious about their work and life practice this. Every driver who backs into something that goes crunch (and you know who you are!) has analyzed that mistake six ways from Thursday and will never do that again!

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Fire Marshal Bill's Comment
member avatar

Remember this military saying

"Slow is smooth and smooth is fast."

Do everything by the numbers and your will be fine.

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