Drafting/Tailgating

Topic 1349 | Page 1

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Mike B.'s Comment
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Hey Everyone,

I was just wondering how truckers feel about regular cars drafting them on the highway? I understand that it is very dangerous and stupid, but it does happen. Just want some opinion of actual drivers.

Thanks Mike

Daniel B.'s Comment
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Hey Everyone,

I was just wondering how truckers feel about regular cars drafting them on the highway? I understand that it is very dangerous and stupid, but it does happen. Just want some opinion of actual drivers.

Thanks Mike

The most annoying thing you can do to me besides braking in front of me is to tailgate me. Especially at night. During the day I can't see you but I can swing my trailer a little bit to just glance at you for a second but at night I have no idea if you're a cop ready to pull me over. Imagine driving and someone right behind you but you can only see 4 inches of their vehicle if not less. It's extremely annoying. 4-wheelers need to learn how to avoid trucks blind spots. It makes me nervous honestly.

Old School's Comment
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Mike, a professional driver has to be aware of what's going on at all times on all six sides of his truck (front, back, both sides, above and below) Some drivers don't seem to give much thought to what goes on behind them, thinking they have no control over that, but there are things you can do to avoid an accident from the rear just like you can avoid problems in other areas around your truck.

Whenever I have someone riding right on my tail, if I am passing another truck, I'll try to signal that I'm getting back over into the right lane ahead of time so they won't try to shoot around me as soon as they think they've got enough clearance. This happens so often to me that I've learned to really watch out for them doing that. It takes a little time to pass another truck when you're both governed down to an economical speed, and the four wheelers understandably get a little anxious to get around us because of that.

As far as someone trying to draft your truck, it is best to just slow it down a little so they get bored with it. Don't slam on your brakes though, it's just not safe and someone could seriously get hurt.

Daniel B.'s Comment
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That's exactly my counter old school. I just gradually slow myself down on purpose. They leave eventually!

RedGator's Comment
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I usually flash my markers at them to make it look like im breaking. They usually move. Why a car would wanna follow that close is beyond me.

Daniel B.'s Comment
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I usually flash my markers at them to make it look like im breaking. They usually move. Why a car would wanna follow that close is beyond me.

Not a bad idea. Ill have to experiment with that.

RedGator's Comment
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I usually flash my markers at them to make it look like im breaking. They usually move. Why a car would wanna follow that close is beyond me.

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Not a bad idea. Ill have to experiment with that.

Its a win win. I dont slow down (even though I wanna)smile.gif They do cause they think I am or they moverofl-3.gif I hate cars lol

Joe S. (a.k.a. The Blue 's Comment
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Several years ago when trucks weren't governed like they are now, cars (me included) would draft a truck when speeding to help with the chance of getting caught.

Radar was rare back then. But you would run onto it once in a while. And when you did, if you were behind a big truck, the radar couldn't see you.

Radar works much better now than it did then. I doubt it works like it did years ago. And since trucks are governed like they are. Today is more about fuel mileage than it is about getting a speeding ticket.

You wouldn't believe how much gas a 4 wheeler will save when drafting a big truck.

Sorry to say, I have done it many times. Before I knew better. And if you get into the right spot, you foot is hardly even on the gas pedal.

I don't do that anymore and haven't in years since I learned better.

Keep it safe out there. Joe S

PR aka Road Hog's Comment
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What many four wheelers don't understand is that a rig displaces an incredible amount of air. Cars don't need to tailgate in order to draft, and certainly don' t need to be in the blind spot. When I draft, and I do, i make sure I can easily see the drivers mirrors, and then back off a little more.

Communication and education are the keys, and stickers like "if i you can't see my mirrors, I can't see you" are effective. The best advice is like they say above. Slow down, those four wheelers are impatient. Slow down, they will pass

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Zach's Comment
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Wouldnt want to be accused of trolling ,but I've rearended twice ,once by another big truck ,and once by passenger car ,...i could post photos of the aftermath but suffice to say a young woman driver lost her head ,one of her 2 children in backseat also...the other survived ,but i cannot imagine what sort of nightmares she has endured since .

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

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