FedEx Road Driver Apprentice (LTL Linehaul)

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G-Rod's Comment
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So last night I spent 3 hours in the yard in a hostler buggy, hooking and unhooking and moving around a pup trailer. Just practicing back and a little maneuvering on my own. I don't think I did too bad. Spent 4 years driving a straight truck so some of that came back to me. Seems like the pups react kind fast to turning when backing. Seems like they would react faster than a 53 footer. Might find that out tonight.

Road manager told me he should have a conditional offer for me in the next day or two. Pretty much means I'm in!

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

So last night I spent 3 hours in the yard in a hostler buggy, hooking and unhooking and moving around a pup trailer. Just practicing back and a little maneuvering on my own. I don't think I did too bad. Spent 4 years driving a straight truck so some of that came back to me. Seems like the pups react kind fast to turning when backing. Seems like they would react faster than a 53 footer. Might find that out tonight.

Road manager told me he should have a conditional offer for me in the next day or two. Pretty much means I'm in!

Pups react faster, and so do the yard mules - due to shorter wheelbase.

I've driven mules on the port (in the longshoremans union) - 40' container carts.

When I went to get certified (after already having a CDL-A), it was a breeze doing the yard maneuvers - compared to wrestling around a 53' trailer for my CDL-A tests.

Rick

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

Yep, pups react much quicker, and a dolly is even more quick! I definitely prefer to pull a set of pups to a van. You have way more maneuverability with a set ... except backing.

Sounds like it's all coming together for you Jared. Pretty soon I'll be able to say "welcome to the dark side driver." I'm assuming you'll be starting off like most linehaul drivers - running nights. Does your barn have day runs for linehaul drivers?

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
G-Rod's Comment
member avatar

Ugh, no, I have not seen nor heard of any day runs for line haul here. All nights. Starting off, all I'd be doing for the first couple years is taking a set from our smaller terminal to a bigger bulk break terminal (I think that's what I heard you call it) about 45 miles away, work their dock for 5-6 hours, then take another set back to home terminal in the morning. Until seniority is built up. Not jumping straight to the road all night, but it may be somewhat good because it will allow my body to get use to being awake all night. I know if I'm moving and doing dock work it shouldn't be a problem, but I know sitting in a dark truck all night alone can definitely make your body want to go to sleep.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Line Haul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

Well, day runs for linehaul aren't very common. I work at a break bulk terminal , and break bulks tend to be larger and have more runs, which means a chance for a daylight run.

One thing to keep in mind is that working nights is something even some senior drivers still struggle with. It's easier for some people, others just always struggle with it. So don't feel bad or that you're not cut out for linehaul if you notice that running nights is tough for you. There are tricks to the trade to make it easier. It's a sacrifice, running nights, but personally I consider it worth the sacrifice to be a linehaul driver. When I ran nights, I just tried to embrace the positives of it, and just made it a lifestyle.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
G-Rod's Comment
member avatar

Well 6 string, at 35, and what I feel like has been not much in the way of opportunities in life thus far due to being deemed "stupid" by the work world because of only a high school diploma, and being stuck in a dead end warehouse job at $40K/year for the last 10 years with weak a$$ 2-3% a year raises, with an opportunity like this to make double and potentially more......I feel like I will MAKE IT WORK.

It's the people like myself who these corporations constantly pass up because of a $50,000 piece of paper that have no idea the amount of drive and will to succeed someone has when they are given the chance.

KaSandra 's Comment
member avatar

Well 6 string, at 35, and what I feel like has been not much in the way of opportunities in life thus far due to being deemed "stupid" by the work world because of only a high school diploma, and being stuck in a dead end warehouse job at $40K/year for the last 10 years with weak a$$ 2-3% a year raises, with an opportunity like this to make double and potentially more......I feel like I will MAKE IT WORK.

It's the people like myself who these corporations constantly pass up because of a $50,000 piece of paper that have no idea the amount of drive and will to succeed someone has when they are given the chance.

Hey Jared , I'm with you on this...think you're a bit ahead of me tho...I do my drug test/physical with Fedex freight in my town this Monday...I had a DOT physical already but Fedex requires their own...Then honestly I do WHATEVER the hell Fedex tells me..drive,dock,etc..:) (after they send me away to train their way:)...I am just honored to get the opportunity to work for them...I had some personal stuff to deal with after trucking school so have been on a kinda painful trucking pause, but things are slowly turning around for me-this is the kinda stuff that builds character and backbone.. Good luck with everything! ~KaSandra

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

G-Rod's Comment
member avatar

Congrats KaSandra. I haven't been on here in a while. I just got started on my apprenticeship last Monday. It's been quite the process. There were 2 other guys in training before me so I think that has slowed me down. When I first got hired I did bout 3 days in the corner of our yard doin just backing maneuvers in a hostler. Then I did about a week and a half hostling in the yard. Then, I went back to the dock for about 2 more weeks, then back in the hostler for a week for more practice. And started the apprenticeship last Monday. Instructor says I'm doin great on everything, but my pretrip sucked......only because I'm not motor smart so I had to learn all the parts and what to look for. Fast forward to today, and for the most part have the pretrip down. Just polishing up a few things. Just came back from a little cruise around our industrial park practicing shifting, braking, and turning. On lunch now, and then heading out on the road. Excited and nervous at the same time. Plus its raining so I get to learn in the rain lol. Thats where I'm sitting in my apprenticeship right now.

You said you have already been through trucking school? If that is the case, this should mostly all just be a refresher for you. Good luck!

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Bret's Comment
member avatar

Have my 2nd "official in person" interview with ODFL Tuesday for a line haul gig and Im scared lol.

I'd love to get 6 strings or any of other ODFL line haul guys feedback of what my 4 weeks of training might look like.

Would love to hear an update Jared of how things are going!

Be safe boss!!

Congrats KaSandra. I haven't been on here in a while. I just got started on my apprenticeship last Monday. It's been quite the process. There were 2 other guys in training before me so I think that has slowed me down. When I first got hired I did bout 3 days in the corner of our yard doin just backing maneuvers in a hostler. Then I did about a week and a half hostling in the yard. Then, I went back to the dock for about 2 more weeks, then back in the hostler for a week for more practice. And started the apprenticeship last Monday. Instructor says I'm doin great on everything, but my pretrip sucked......only because I'm not motor smart so I had to learn all the parts and what to look for. Fast forward to today, and for the most part have the pretrip down. Just polishing up a few things. Just came back from a little cruise around our industrial park practicing shifting, braking, and turning. On lunch now, and then heading out on the road. Excited and nervous at the same time. Plus its raining so I get to learn in the rain lol. Thats where I'm sitting in my apprenticeship right now.

You said you have already been through trucking school? If that is the case, this should mostly all just be a refresher for you. Good luck!

Line Haul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

Hello Bret P, welcome to our forum!

If you haven't seen it yet, you should read Six Strings Thread about starting and working for Old Dominion. There's a lot of great information in that read.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
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